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Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, McKusick type(CHH)

MedGen UID:
67398
Concept ID:
C0220748
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Cartilage hair hypoplasia like syndrome; Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia; Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia-Anauxetic Dysplasia Spectrum Disorders; CHH
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in homozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, autosomal recessive disorders manifest in homozygotes (with two copies of the mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal recessive inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
SNOMED CT: Cartilage hair syndrome (7720002); Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, McKusick type (7720002); Cartilage-hair hypoplasia syndrome (7720002)
 
Gene (location): RMRP (9p13.3)
OMIM®: 250250
Orphanet: ORPHA175

Disease characteristics

The cartilage-hair hypoplasia – anauxetic dysplasia (CHH-AD) spectrum disorders are a continuum that includes the following phenotypes: Metaphyseal dysplasia without hypotrichosis (MDWH). Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH). Anauxetic dysplasia (AD). CHH-AD spectrum disorders are characterized by severe disproportionate (short-limb) short stature which is usually recognized in the newborn, and occasionally prenatally because of the short extremities. Other findings include joint hypermobility and often fine silky hair, immunodeficiency, anemia, impaired spermatogenesis, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and increased risk for malignancy. The most severe phenotype (AD), which has the most pronounced skeletal phenotype, may be associated with atlantoaxial subluxation in the newborn and may include cognitive deficiency. The clinical manifestations of the CHH-AD spectrum disorders are variable, even within the same family. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Outi Mäkitie  |  Svetlana Kostjukovits   view full author information

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
Cartilage-hair hypoplasia is a form of short-limbed dwarfism due to skeletal dysplasia, which was first recognized by McKusick et al. (1965) in the Old Order Amish, a religious isolate (see also McKusick, 1978). Makitie et al. (1995) gave an extensive review of CHH.  http://www.omim.org/entry/250250
From GHR
Cartilage-hair hypoplasia is a disorder of bone growth characterized by short stature (dwarfism) with other skeletal abnormalities; fine, sparse hair (hypotrichosis); and abnormal immune system function (immune deficiency) that can lead to recurrent infections.People with cartilage-hair hypoplasia have unusually short limbs and short stature from birth. They typically have malformations in the cartilage near the ends of the long bones in the arms and legs (metaphyseal chondrodysplasia), which then affects development of the bone itself. Most people with cartilage-hair hypoplasia are unusually flexible in some joints, but they may have difficulty extending their elbows fully.Affected individuals have hair that is lighter in color than that of other family members because the core of each hair, which contains some of the pigment that contributes the hair's color, is missing. The missing core also makes each strand of hair thinner, causing the hair to have a sparse appearance overall. Unusually light-colored skin (hypopigmentation), malformed nails, and dental abnormalities may also be seen in this disorder.The extent of the immune deficiency in cartilage-hair hypoplasia varies from mild to severe. Affected individuals with the most severe immune problems are considered to have severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). People with SCID lack virtually all immune protection from bacteria, viruses, and fungi and are prone to repeated and persistent infections that can be very serious or life-threatening. These infections are often caused by "opportunistic" organisms that ordinarily do not cause illness in people with a normal immune system. Most people with cartilage-hair hypoplasia, even those who have milder immune deficiency, experience infections of the respiratory system, ears, and sinuses. In particular, the chicken pox virus (varicella) often causes dangerous infections in people with this disorder. Autoimmune disorders, which occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's tissues and organs, occur in some people with cartilage-hair hypoplasia. Affected individuals are also at an increased risk of developing cancer, particularly certain skin cancers (basal cell carcinomas), cancer of blood-forming cells (leukemia), and cancer of immune system cells (lymphoma).Some people with cartilage-hair hypoplasia experience gastrointestinal problems. These problems may include an inability to properly absorb nutrients or intolerance of a protein called gluten found in wheat and other grains (celiac disease). Affected individuals may have Hirschsprung disease, an intestinal disorder that causes severe constipation, intestinal blockage, and enlargement of the colon. Narrowing of the anus (anal stenosis) or blockage of the esophagus (esophageal atresia) may also occur.  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/cartilage-hair-hypoplasia

Clinical features

Malignant Skin Neoplasm
MedGen UID:
40101
Concept ID:
C0007114
Neoplastic Process
Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. . Anyone can get skin cancer, but it is more common in people who . - Spend a lot of time in the sun or have been sunburned. - Have light-colored skin, hair and eyes. - Have a family member with skin cancer. - Are over age 50. You should have your doctor check any suspicious skin markings and any changes in the way your skin looks. Treatment is more likely to work well when cancer is found early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy (PDT), and biologic therapy. PDT uses a drug and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute.
Enchondromatosis
MedGen UID:
41775
Concept ID:
C0014084
Finding
Enchondromas are common benign cartilage tumors of bone. They can occur as solitary lesions or as multiple lesions in enchondromatosis. When hemangiomata are associated, the condition is known as Maffucci syndrome (614569). Clinical problems caused by enchondromas include skeletal deformity and the potential for malignant change to osteosarcoma (Schwartz et al., 1987). Classification of the Enchondromatoses In their classification of the enchondromatoses, Spranger et al. (1978) called Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome types I and II enchondromatosis, respectively; metachondromatosis (156250), type III; spondyloenchondrodysplasia (607944), type IV; enchondromatosis with irregular vertebral lesions, type V; and generalized enchondromatosis, type VI. Halal and Azouz (1991) added 3 tentative categories to the 6 in the classification of Spranger et al. (1978). Pansuriya et al. (2010) suggested a new classification of enchondromatosis (multiple enchondromas).
Lymphoma
MedGen UID:
44223
Concept ID:
C0024299
Neoplastic Process
Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have a weakened immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as . -Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin. -Unexplained weight loss . -Fever . -Soaking night sweats . -Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain . -Weakness and tiredness that don't go away . -Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen . Your doctor will diagnose lymphoma with a physical exam, blood tests, a chest x-ray, and a biopsy. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, biological therapy, or therapy to remove proteins from the blood. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. If you don't have symptoms, you may not need treatment right away. This is called watchful waiting. NIH: National Cancer Institute.
Arrhythmia
MedGen UID:
2039
Concept ID:
C0003811
Finding
An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat. It means that your heart beats too quickly, too slowly, or with an irregular pattern. When the heart beats faster than normal, it is called tachycardia. When the heart beats too slowly, it is called bradycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and fast heart beat. Many factors can affect your heart's rhythm, such as having had a heart attack, smoking, congenital heart defects, and stress. Some substances or medicines may also cause arrhythmias. . Symptoms of arrhythmias include. -Fast or slow heart beat. -Skipping beats. -Lightheadedness or dizziness. -Chest pain. -Shortness of breath . -Sweating . Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have an arrhythmia. Treatment to restore a normal heart rhythm may include medicines, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker, or sometimes surgery. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
2881
Concept ID:
C0007194
Disease or Syndrome
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of increased ventricular wall thickness or mass in the absence of loading conditions (hypertension, valve disease) sufficient to cause the observed abnormality.
Congenital septal defect
MedGen UID:
6752
Concept ID:
C0018816
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormalities in any part of the HEART SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communication between the left and the right chambers of the heart. The abnormal blood flow inside the heart may be caused by defects in the ATRIAL SEPTUM, the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM, or both.
Hypermetropia
MedGen UID:
43780
Concept ID:
C0020490
Disease or Syndrome
A refractive error in which rays of light entering the eye parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus behind the retina, as a result of the eyeball being too short from front to back. It is also called farsightedness because the near point is more distant than it is in emmetropia with an equal amplitude of accommodation. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Myopia
MedGen UID:
44558
Concept ID:
C0027092
Disease or Syndrome
An abnormality of refraction characterized by the ability to see objects nearby clearly, while objects in the distance appear blurry.
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
Strabismus (also known as squint) is a condition in which the eyes are not properly aligned with each other.
Visual impairment
MedGen UID:
22663
Concept ID:
C0042798
Finding
Vision considered to be inferior to normal vision as represented by accepted standards of acuity, field of vision, or motility. Low vision generally refers to visual disorders that are caused by diseases that cannot be corrected by refraction (e.g., MACULAR DEGENERATION; RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, etc.).
Abnormal blue sclerae
MedGen UID:
154236
Concept ID:
C0542514
Finding
An abnormal bluish coloration of the sclera.
Abnormality of retinal pigmentation
MedGen UID:
350681
Concept ID:
C1862475
Finding
Aplasia/Hypoplasia affecting the eye
MedGen UID:
870303
Concept ID:
C4024745
Finding
Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia
MedGen UID:
8064
Concept ID:
C0002876
Disease or Syndrome
A type of hypoplastic anemia with congenital onset.
Macrocytic anemia
MedGen UID:
1920
Concept ID:
C0002886
Disease or Syndrome
A type of anemia characterized by increased size of erythrocytes with increased mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and increased mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH).
Lymphoma
MedGen UID:
44223
Concept ID:
C0024299
Neoplastic Process
Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have a weakened immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as . -Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin. -Unexplained weight loss . -Fever . -Soaking night sweats . -Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain . -Weakness and tiredness that don't go away . -Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen . Your doctor will diagnose lymphoma with a physical exam, blood tests, a chest x-ray, and a biopsy. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, biological therapy, or therapy to remove proteins from the blood. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. If you don't have symptoms, you may not need treatment right away. This is called watchful waiting. NIH: National Cancer Institute.
Lymphocytopenia
MedGen UID:
7418
Concept ID:
C0024312
Disease or Syndrome
A finding based on laboratory test results that indicate a decrease in number of lymphocytes in a blood specimen.
Hypogammaglobulinemia
MedGen UID:
88568
Concept ID:
C0086438
Disease or Syndrome
Decreased concentration of the gamma fraction of serum globulin
Neutropenia
MedGen UID:
163121
Concept ID:
C0853697
Finding
An abnormally low number of neutrophils in the peripheral blood.
Impaired lymphocyte transformation with phytohemagglutinin
MedGen UID:
871152
Concept ID:
C4025625
Finding
Normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, when stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) are cytotoxic for homologous and heterologous cells but not for autologous cells in monolayer culture. The cytotoxic effect is thought to be indicative of the immunological competence of the lymphocytes.
Mucopolysacchariduria
MedGen UID:
870284
Concept ID:
C4024726
Finding
Excessive amounts of mucopolysaccharide in the urine.
Micromelia
MedGen UID:
10031
Concept ID:
C0025995
Congenital Abnormality
The presence of abnormally small extremities.
Brachydactyly
MedGen UID:
67454
Concept ID:
C0221357
Congenital Abnormality
Digits that appear disproportionately short compared to the hand/foot. The word brachydactyly is used to describe a series of Mendelian diseases characterized by distinct patterns of shortened digits (brachydactyly types A-E). This is the sense used here, however, it is preferable to described the observed phenotypic abnormalities precisely.
Pyle metaphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
82704
Concept ID:
C0265294
Disease or Syndrome
Pyle disease is characterized by long bones with wide and expanded trabecular metaphyses, thin cortical bone, and bone fragility. Fractures are common in Pyle disease, and fracture lines usually go through the abnormally wide metaphyses, revealing their fragility (summary by Simsek Kiper et al., 2016).
Metaphyseal cupping
MedGen UID:
323062
Concept ID:
C1837082
Finding
Metaphyseal cupping refers to an inward bulging of the metaphyseal profile giving the metaphysis a cup-like appearance.
Short palm
MedGen UID:
334684
Concept ID:
C1843108
Finding
Short palm.
Metaphyseal widening
MedGen UID:
341364
Concept ID:
C1849039
Finding
A radiologic finding characterized by an increased width of the metaphyseal regions. It is seen in rickets.
Bowing of the long bones
MedGen UID:
340849
Concept ID:
C1855340
Disease or Syndrome
A bending or abnormal curvature of a long bone.
Limited elbow extension
MedGen UID:
401158
Concept ID:
C1867103
Finding
Limited ability to straighten the arm at the elbow joint.
Abnormality of the distal phalanx of finger
MedGen UID:
867027
Concept ID:
C4021385
Anatomical Abnormality
Any anomaly of distal phalanx of finger.
Abnormality of the tibia
MedGen UID:
871186
Concept ID:
C4025663
Anatomical Abnormality
Abnormality of the tibia (shinbone).
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
Height greater than two standard deviations below the mean of the appropriate reference population for the age and sex of the individual.
Short limb dwarfism recognizable at birth
MedGen UID:
337984
Concept ID:
C1850171
Finding
A type of short-limbed dwarfism that is manifest beginning in the neonatal period.
Macrotia
MedGen UID:
488785
Concept ID:
C0152421
Congenital Abnormality
Median longitudinal ear length greater than two standard deviations above the mean and median ear width greater than two standard deviations above the mean (objective); or, apparent increase in length and width of the pinna (subjective).
Low-set, posteriorly rotated ears
MedGen UID:
387834
Concept ID:
C1857486
Finding
Ears that are low-set (HP:0000369) and posteriorly rotated (HP:0000358).
Hirschsprung disease
MedGen UID:
5559
Concept ID:
C0019569
Congenital Abnormality
Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital intestinal aganglionosis, is a birth defect characterized by complete absence of neuronal ganglion cells from a portion of the intestinal tract. The aganglionic segment includes the distal rectum and a variable length of contiguous proximal intestine. In 80% of individuals, aganglionosis is restricted to the rectosigmoid colon (short-segment disease); in 15%-20%, aganglionosis extends proximal to the sigmoid colon (long-segment disease); in about 5%, aganglionosis affects the entire large intestine (total colonic aganglionosis). Rarely, the aganglionosis extends into the small bowel or even more proximally to encompass the entire bowel (total intestinal aganglionosis). HSCR is considered a neurocristopathy, a disorder of cells and tissues derived from the neural crest, and may occur as an isolated finding or as part of a multisystem disorder. Affected infants frequently present in the first two months of life with symptoms of impaired intestinal motility such as failure to pass meconium within the first 48 hours of life, constipation, emesis, abdominal pain or distention, and occasionally diarrhea. However, because the initial diagnosis of HSCR may be delayed until late childhood or adulthood, HSCR should be considered in anyone with lifelong severe constipation. Individuals with HSCR are at risk for enterocolitis and/or potentially lethal intestinal perforation.
Neural tube defect
MedGen UID:
18009
Concept ID:
C0027794
Finding
Neural tube defects are the second most common type of birth defect after congenital heart defects. The 2 most common NTDs are open spina bifida, also known as spina bifida cystica (SBC) or myelomeningocele, and anencephaly (206500) (Detrait et al., 2005). Spina bifida occulta (SBO), a bony defect of the spine covered by normal skin, is a mild form of spina bifida that is often asymptomatic. The term 'spinal dysraphia' refers to both SBC and SBO (Botto et al., 1999; Fineman et al., 1982). The most severe neural tube defect, craniorachischisis (CRN), leaves the neural tube open from the midbrain or rostral hindbrain to the base of the spine (summary by Robinson et al., 2012). Neural tube defects represent a complex trait with multifactorial etiology encompassing both genetic and environmental components (summary by Bartsch et al., 2012 and Lei et al., 2014). An X-linked form of spina bifida has been suggested; see 301410. See also folate-sensitive neural tube defects (601634), which are caused by genes involved in folate metabolism.
EEG abnormality
MedGen UID:
56235
Concept ID:
C0151611
Finding
Abnormality observed by electroencephalogram (EEG), which is used to record of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp.
Cognitive impairment
MedGen UID:
90932
Concept ID:
C0338656
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
a condition where a person has problems with the ability to think and learn
Decreased to absent deep tendon reflexes
MedGen UID:
356648
Concept ID:
C1866934
Finding
Diminution of tendon reflexes, which is an invariable sign of peripheral nerve disease.
Respiratory insufficiency
MedGen UID:
11197
Concept ID:
C0035229
Pathologic Function
Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide.
Tracheal stenosis
MedGen UID:
21227
Concept ID:
C0040583
Disease or Syndrome
Narrowing of the lumen of the trachea.
Esophageal atresia
MedGen UID:
4545
Concept ID:
C0014850
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital abnormality characterized by the lack of full development of the ESOPHAGUS that commonly occurs with TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA. Symptoms include excessive SALIVATION; GAGGING; CYANOSIS; and DYSPNEA.
Hepatomegaly
MedGen UID:
42428
Concept ID:
C0019209
Sign or Symptom
Enlargement of the liver.
Hirschsprung disease
MedGen UID:
5559
Concept ID:
C0019569
Congenital Abnormality
Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital intestinal aganglionosis, is a birth defect characterized by complete absence of neuronal ganglion cells from a portion of the intestinal tract. The aganglionic segment includes the distal rectum and a variable length of contiguous proximal intestine. In 80% of individuals, aganglionosis is restricted to the rectosigmoid colon (short-segment disease); in 15%-20%, aganglionosis extends proximal to the sigmoid colon (long-segment disease); in about 5%, aganglionosis affects the entire large intestine (total colonic aganglionosis). Rarely, the aganglionosis extends into the small bowel or even more proximally to encompass the entire bowel (total intestinal aganglionosis). HSCR is considered a neurocristopathy, a disorder of cells and tissues derived from the neural crest, and may occur as an isolated finding or as part of a multisystem disorder. Affected infants frequently present in the first two months of life with symptoms of impaired intestinal motility such as failure to pass meconium within the first 48 hours of life, constipation, emesis, abdominal pain or distention, and occasionally diarrhea. However, because the initial diagnosis of HSCR may be delayed until late childhood or adulthood, HSCR should be considered in anyone with lifelong severe constipation. Individuals with HSCR are at risk for enterocolitis and/or potentially lethal intestinal perforation.
Disorder of pancreas
MedGen UID:
14583
Concept ID:
C0030286
Disease or Syndrome
The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include. -Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas: This happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. - Pancreatic cancer. - Cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder in which thick, sticky mucus can also block tubes in your pancreas. The pancreas also plays a role in diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked them. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. .
Malabsorption
MedGen UID:
811453
Concept ID:
C3714745
Finding
Impaired ability to absorb one or more nutrients from the intestine.
Aplasia/Hypoplasia of the abdominal wall musculature
MedGen UID:
869482
Concept ID:
C4023909
Finding
Absence or underdevelopment of the abdominal musculature.
Muscular hypotonia
MedGen UID:
10133
Concept ID:
C0026827
Finding
A diminution of the skeletal muscle tone marked by a diminished resistance to passive stretching.
Aplasia/Hypoplasia of the abdominal wall musculature
MedGen UID:
869482
Concept ID:
C4023909
Finding
Absence or underdevelopment of the abdominal musculature.
Lymphocytopenia
MedGen UID:
7418
Concept ID:
C0024312
Disease or Syndrome
A finding based on laboratory test results that indicate a decrease in number of lymphocytes in a blood specimen.
Hypogammaglobulinemia
MedGen UID:
88568
Concept ID:
C0086438
Disease or Syndrome
Decreased concentration of the gamma fraction of serum globulin
Neutropenia
MedGen UID:
163121
Concept ID:
C0853697
Finding
An abnormally low number of neutrophils in the peripheral blood.
Cellular immunodeficiency
MedGen UID:
344444
Concept ID:
C1855204
Finding
Susceptibility to chickenpox
MedGen UID:
381583
Concept ID:
C1855205
Finding
Impaired lymphocyte transformation with phytohemagglutinin
MedGen UID:
871152
Concept ID:
C4025625
Finding
Normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, when stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) are cytotoxic for homologous and heterologous cells but not for autologous cells in monolayer culture. The cytotoxic effect is thought to be indicative of the immunological competence of the lymphocytes.
Hypocalcemia
MedGen UID:
5705
Concept ID:
C0020598
Pathologic Function
An abnormally decreased calcium concentration in the blood.
Hypogammaglobulinemia
MedGen UID:
88568
Concept ID:
C0086438
Disease or Syndrome
Decreased concentration of the gamma fraction of serum globulin
Chromosome Breakage
MedGen UID:
91280
Concept ID:
C0376628
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
A type of chromosomal aberration involving DNA BREAKS. Chromosome breakage can result in CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; or SEQUENCE DELETION.
Mucopolysacchariduria
MedGen UID:
870284
Concept ID:
C4024726
Finding
Excessive amounts of mucopolysaccharide in the urine.
Enchondromatosis
MedGen UID:
41775
Concept ID:
C0014084
Finding
Enchondromas are common benign cartilage tumors of bone. They can occur as solitary lesions or as multiple lesions in enchondromatosis. When hemangiomata are associated, the condition is known as Maffucci syndrome (614569). Clinical problems caused by enchondromas include skeletal deformity and the potential for malignant change to osteosarcoma (Schwartz et al., 1987). Classification of the Enchondromatoses In their classification of the enchondromatoses, Spranger et al. (1978) called Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome types I and II enchondromatosis, respectively; metachondromatosis (156250), type III; spondyloenchondrodysplasia (607944), type IV; enchondromatosis with irregular vertebral lesions, type V; and generalized enchondromatosis, type VI. Halal and Azouz (1991) added 3 tentative categories to the 6 in the classification of Spranger et al. (1978). Pansuriya et al. (2010) suggested a new classification of enchondromatosis (multiple enchondromas).
Congenital micrognathism
MedGen UID:
44428
Concept ID:
C0025990
Congenital Abnormality
Developmental hypoplasia of the mandible.
Micromelia
MedGen UID:
10031
Concept ID:
C0025995
Congenital Abnormality
The presence of abnormally small extremities.
Pectus carinatum
MedGen UID:
57643
Concept ID:
C0158731
Finding
A deformity of the chest caused by overgrowth of the ribs and characterized by protrusion of the sternum.
Frontal bossing
MedGen UID:
67453
Concept ID:
C0221354
Congenital Abnormality
Bilateral bulging of the lateral frontal bone prominences with relative sparing of the midline.
Brachycephaly
MedGen UID:
113165
Concept ID:
C0221356
Congenital Abnormality
An abnormality of skull shape characterized by a decreased anterior-posterior diameter. That is, a cephalic index greater than 81%. Alternatively, an apparently shortened anteroposterior dimension (length) of the head compared to width.
Brachydactyly
MedGen UID:
67454
Concept ID:
C0221357
Congenital Abnormality
Digits that appear disproportionately short compared to the hand/foot. The word brachydactyly is used to describe a series of Mendelian diseases characterized by distinct patterns of shortened digits (brachydactyly types A-E). This is the sense used here, however, it is preferable to described the observed phenotypic abnormalities precisely.
Pyle metaphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
82704
Concept ID:
C0265294
Disease or Syndrome
Pyle disease is characterized by long bones with wide and expanded trabecular metaphyses, thin cortical bone, and bone fragility. Fractures are common in Pyle disease, and fracture lines usually go through the abnormally wide metaphyses, revealing their fragility (summary by Simsek Kiper et al., 2016).
Short thorax
MedGen UID:
140876
Concept ID:
C0426789
Finding
Reduced inferior to superior extent of the thorax.
Narrow chest
MedGen UID:
96528
Concept ID:
C0426790
Finding
Reduced width of the chest from side to side, associated with a reduced distance from the sternal notch to the tip of the shoulder.
Sacral dimple
MedGen UID:
98428
Concept ID:
C0426848
Finding
A sacral dimple, or pilonidal dimple, is a small hollow area or sinus present at birth and located just above the crease of the buttocks. In most cases, pilonidal dimples are benign and may just be accompanied by increased hair growth in the area.
Short neck
MedGen UID:
99267
Concept ID:
C0521525
Finding
Diminished length of the neck.
Delayed bone age
MedGen UID:
108148
Concept ID:
C0541764
Finding
A decreased rate of skeletal maturation. Delayed skeletal maturation can be diagnosed on the basis of an estimation of the bone age from radiographs of specific bones in the human body.
Accelerated skeletal maturation
MedGen UID:
154262
Concept ID:
C0545053
Finding
An abnormally increased rate of skeletal maturation. Accelerated skeletal maturation can be diagnosed on the basis of an estimation of the bone age from radiographs of specific bones in the human body.
Scoliosis
MedGen UID:
195976
Concept ID:
C0700208
Finding
The presence of an abnormal lateral curvature of the spine.
Lumbar hyperlordosis
MedGen UID:
263149
Concept ID:
C1184923
Finding
An abnormal accentuation of the inward curvature of the spine in the lumbar region.
Narrow interpedicular space
MedGen UID:
318662
Concept ID:
C1832598
Finding
A reduction of the distance between vertebral pedicles, which are the two short, thick processes, which project backward, one on either side, from the upper part of the vertebral body, at the junction of its posterior and lateral surfaces.
Metaphyseal cupping
MedGen UID:
323062
Concept ID:
C1837082
Finding
Metaphyseal cupping refers to an inward bulging of the metaphyseal profile giving the metaphysis a cup-like appearance.
Short palm
MedGen UID:
334684
Concept ID:
C1843108
Finding
Short palm.
Joint hypermobility
MedGen UID:
336793
Concept ID:
C1844820
Finding
The ability of a joint to move beyond its normal range of motion.
Metaphyseal widening
MedGen UID:
341364
Concept ID:
C1849039
Finding
A radiologic finding characterized by an increased width of the metaphyseal regions. It is seen in rickets.
Flaring of lower rib cage
MedGen UID:
381581
Concept ID:
C1855196
Finding
Bowing of the long bones
MedGen UID:
340849
Concept ID:
C1855340
Disease or Syndrome
A bending or abnormal curvature of a long bone.
Malar flattening
MedGen UID:
347616
Concept ID:
C1858085
Anatomical Abnormality
Underdevelopment of the malar prominence of the jugal bone (zygomatic bone in mammals), appreciated in profile, frontal view, and/or by palpation.
Limited elbow extension
MedGen UID:
401158
Concept ID:
C1867103
Finding
Limited ability to straighten the arm at the elbow joint.
Abnormality of pelvic girdle bone morphology
MedGen UID:
866545
Concept ID:
C4020847
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormality of the bony pelvic girdle, which is a ring of bones connecting the vertebral column to the femurs.
Abnormal vertebral ossification
MedGen UID:
866619
Concept ID:
C4020966
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormality of the formation and mineralization of one or more vertebrae.
Abnormality of the distal phalanx of finger
MedGen UID:
867027
Concept ID:
C4021385
Anatomical Abnormality
Any anomaly of distal phalanx of finger.
Abnormality of epiphysis morphology
MedGen UID:
867251
Concept ID:
C4021611
Anatomical Abnormality
An anomaly of epiphysis, which is the expanded articular end of a long bone that developes from a secondary ossification center, and which during the period of growth is either entirely cartilaginous or is separated from the shaft by a cartilaginous disk.
Abnormality of bone mineral density
MedGen UID:
867294
Concept ID:
C4021657
Anatomical Abnormality
This term applies to all changes in bone mineral density which (depending on severity) can be seen on x-rays as a change in density and or structure of the bone. Changes may affect all bones of the organism, just certain bones or only parts of bones and include decreased mineralisation as may be seen in osteoporosis or increased mineralisation and or ossification as in osteopetrosis, exostoses or any kind of atopic calicfications of different origin and distribution. The overall amount of mineralization of the bone-organ can be measured as the amount of matter per cubic centimeter of bones, usually measured by densitometry of the lumbar spine or hip. The measurements are usually reported as g/cm3 or as a Z-score (the number of standard deviations above or below the mean for the patient's age and sex). Note that measurement with this method does not reflect local changes in other bones, and as such might not be correct with regard the hole bone-organ.
Abnormality of the hip bone
MedGen UID:
867370
Concept ID:
C4021735
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormality of the hip bone.
Abnormality of the tibia
MedGen UID:
871186
Concept ID:
C4025663
Anatomical Abnormality
Abnormality of the tibia (shinbone).
Hyperplasia of gingiva
MedGen UID:
4894
Concept ID:
C0017566
Pathologic Function
Hyperplasia of the gingiva (FMA:59762, that is, a thickening of the soft tissue overlying the alveolar ridge. The degree of thickening ranges from involvement of the interdental papillae alone to gingival overgrowth covering the entire tooth crown.
Congenital micrognathism
MedGen UID:
44428
Concept ID:
C0025990
Congenital Abnormality
Developmental hypoplasia of the mandible.
Frontal bossing
MedGen UID:
67453
Concept ID:
C0221354
Congenital Abnormality
Bilateral bulging of the lateral frontal bone prominences with relative sparing of the midline.
Brachycephaly
MedGen UID:
113165
Concept ID:
C0221356
Congenital Abnormality
An abnormality of skull shape characterized by a decreased anterior-posterior diameter. That is, a cephalic index greater than 81%. Alternatively, an apparently shortened anteroposterior dimension (length) of the head compared to width.
Convex nasal ridge
MedGen UID:
66809
Concept ID:
C0240538
Finding
Nasal ridge curving anteriorly to an imaginary line that connects the nasal root and tip. The nose appears often also prominent, and the columella low.
Short neck
MedGen UID:
99267
Concept ID:
C0521525
Finding
Diminished length of the neck.
Madarosis of eyebrow
MedGen UID:
107912
Concept ID:
C0578682
Finding
Decreased density/number and/or decreased diameter of eyebrow hairs.
Epicanthus
MedGen UID:
151862
Concept ID:
C0678230
Congenital Abnormality
Epicanthus is a condition in which a fold of skin stretches from the upper to the lower eyelid, partially covering the inner canthus. Usher (1935) noted that epicanthus is a normal finding in the fetus of all races. Epicanthus also occurs in association with hereditary ptosis (110100).
Depressed nasal bridge
MedGen UID:
373112
Concept ID:
C1836542
Finding
Posterior positioning of the nasal root in relation to the overall facial profile for age.
Broad flat nasal bridge
MedGen UID:
326959
Concept ID:
C1839764
Finding
Increased breadth of the nasal bridge (and with it, the nasal root).
Anteverted nares
MedGen UID:
326648
Concept ID:
C1840077
Finding
Anteriorly-facing nostrils viewed with the head in the Frankfurt horizontal and the eyes of the observer level with the eyes of the subject. This gives the appearance of an upturned nose (upturned nasal tip).
Depressed nasal ridge
MedGen UID:
334631
Concept ID:
C1842876
Finding
Lack of prominence of the nose resulting from a posteriorly-placed nasal ridge.
Sparse eyelashes
MedGen UID:
375151
Concept ID:
C1843300
Finding
Decreased density/number of eyelashes.
Malar flattening
MedGen UID:
347616
Concept ID:
C1858085
Anatomical Abnormality
Underdevelopment of the malar prominence of the jugal bone (zygomatic bone in mammals), appreciated in profile, frontal view, and/or by palpation.
Large face
MedGen UID:
411263
Concept ID:
C2748652
Finding
Abnormality of the palate
MedGen UID:
867440
Concept ID:
C4021815
Anatomical Abnormality
Any abnormality of the palate, i.e., of roof of the mouth.
Malignant Skin Neoplasm
MedGen UID:
40101
Concept ID:
C0007114
Neoplastic Process
Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. . Anyone can get skin cancer, but it is more common in people who . - Spend a lot of time in the sun or have been sunburned. - Have light-colored skin, hair and eyes. - Have a family member with skin cancer. - Are over age 50. You should have your doctor check any suspicious skin markings and any changes in the way your skin looks. Treatment is more likely to work well when cancer is found early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy (PDT), and biologic therapy. PDT uses a drug and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute.
Blonde hair
MedGen UID:
116090
Concept ID:
C0239801
Finding
A lesser degree of hair pigmentation than would otherwise be expected.
Fine hair
MedGen UID:
98401
Concept ID:
C0423867
Finding
Hair that is fine or thin to the touch.
Sacral dimple
MedGen UID:
98428
Concept ID:
C0426848
Finding
A sacral dimple, or pilonidal dimple, is a small hollow area or sinus present at birth and located just above the crease of the buttocks. In most cases, pilonidal dimples are benign and may just be accompanied by increased hair growth in the area.
Madarosis of eyebrow
MedGen UID:
107912
Concept ID:
C0578682
Finding
Decreased density/number and/or decreased diameter of eyebrow hairs.
Sparse eyelashes
MedGen UID:
375151
Concept ID:
C1843300
Finding
Decreased density/number of eyelashes.
Sparse facial hair
MedGen UID:
488981
Concept ID:
C2017869
Finding
Reduced number or density of facial hair.
Abnormal hair quantity
MedGen UID:
868983
Concept ID:
C4023397
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormal amount of hair.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
Follow this link to review classifications for Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, McKusick type in Orphanet.

Recent clinical studies

Diagnosis

Sensenbrenner JA
Birth Defects Orig Artic Ser 1974;10(12):422-4. PMID: 4549299

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