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Results: 4

1.

1q21.1 recurrent microdeletion

The 1q21.1 microdeletion itself does not appear to lead to a clinically recognizable syndrome as some persons with the deletion have no obvious clinical findings and others have variable findings that most commonly include microcephaly (50%); mild intellectual disability (30%); mildly dysmorphic facial features; and eye abnormalities (26%). Other findings can include cardiac defects, genitourinary anomalies, skeletal malformations, and seizures (~15%). Psychiatric and behavioral abnormalities can include autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autistic features, and sleep disturbances. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
393913
Concept ID:
C2675897
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Alagille syndrome 1

Alagille syndrome is a genetic disorder that can affect the liver, heart, and other parts of the body. One of the major features of Alagille syndrome is liver damage caused by abnormalities in the bile ducts. These ducts carry bile (which helps to digest fats) from the liver to the gallbladder and small intestine. In Alagille syndrome, the bile ducts may be narrow, malformed, and reduced in number (bile duct paucity). As a result, bile builds up in the liver and causes scarring that prevents the liver from working properly to eliminate wastes from the bloodstream. Signs and symptoms arising from liver damage in Alagille syndrome may include a yellowish tinge in the skin and the whites of the eyes (jaundice), itchy skin, and deposits of cholesterol in the skin (xanthomas). Alagille syndrome is also associated with several heart problems, including impaired blood flow from the heart into the lungs (pulmonic stenosis). Pulmonic stenosis may occur along with a hole between the two lower chambers of the heart (ventricular septal defect) and other heart abnormalities. This combination of heart defects is called tetralogy of Fallot. People with Alagille syndrome may have distinctive facial features including a broad, prominent forehead; deep-set eyes; and a small, pointed chin. The disorder may also affect the blood vessels within the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) and the kidneys. Affected individuals may have an unusual butterfly shape of the bones of the spinal column (vertebrae) that can be seen in an x-ray. Problems associated with Alagille syndrome generally become evident in infancy or early childhood. The severity of the disorder varies among affected individuals, even within the same family. Symptoms range from so mild as to go unnoticed to severe heart and/or liver disease requiring transplantation. Some people with Alagille syndrome may have isolated signs of the disorder, such as a heart defect like tetralogy of Fallot, or a characteristic facial appearance. These individuals do not have liver disease or other features typical of the disorder.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
365434
Concept ID:
C1956125
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Alagille syndrome 2

Alagille syndrome (ALGS) is a complex multisystem disorder involving primarily the liver, heart, eyes, face, and skeleton. The clinical features are highly variable, even within families. The major clinical manifestations of ALGS are cholestasis, characterized by bile duct paucity on liver biopsy; congenital cardiac defects, primarily involving the pulmonary arteries; posterior embryotoxon in the eye; typical facial features; and butterfly vertebrae. Renal and central nervous abnormalities also occur. Mortality is approximately 10%, with vascular accidents, cardiac disease, and liver disease accounting for most of the deaths. [from NCBI]

MedGen UID:
341844
Concept ID:
C1857761
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Arteriohepatic dysplasia

Alagille syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder that traditionally has been defined by a paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts, in association with 5 main clinical abnormalities: cholestasis, cardiac disease, skeletal abnormalities, ocular abnormalities, and a characteristic facial phenotype (Li et al., 1997). Cholestasis is a direct consequence of the paucity of bile ducts. About 39% of patients also have renal involvement, mainly renal dysplasia (Kamath et al., 2012). Turnpenny and Ellard (2012) reviewed the clinical features, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and genetics of Alagille syndrome. Genetic Heterogeneity of Alagille Syndrome Another form of Alagille syndrome (ALGS2; 610205) is caused by mutation in the NOTCH2 gene (600275). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
39014
Concept ID:
C0085280
Congenital Abnormality

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