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Leber optic atrophy(LHON)

MedGen UID:
182973
Concept ID:
C0917796
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy; Leber's disease; Leber's optic atrophy; LHON; Optic Atrophy, Hereditary, Leber; Optic atrophy, Leber type
Modes of inheritance:
Heterogeneous
MedGen UID:
67020
Concept ID:
C0242960
Organism Attribute
Source: HPO
The production of the same or similar phenotypes (observed biochemical, physiological, and morphological characteristics of a person determined by his/her genotype) by different genetic mechanisms. There are two types: (1) allelic heterogeneity - when different alleles at a locus can produce variable expression of a condition; and (2) locus heterogeneity - the term used to describe disease in which mutations at different loci can produce the same disease phenotype.
Mitochondrial inheritance
MedGen UID:
165802
Concept ID:
C0887941
Genetic Function
Source: HPO
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on the mitochondrial genome. Because the mitochondrial genome is essentially always maternally inherited, a mitochondrial condition can only be transmitted by females, although the condition can affect both sexes. The proportion of mutant mitochondria can vary (heteroplasmy).
SNOMED CT: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (58610003); LHON - Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (58610003); LHON - Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (58610003); Leber optic atrophy (58610003); Leber's optic atrophy (58610003)
 
Genes (locations): MT-ATP6; MT-CO3; MT-CYB; MT-ND1; MT-ND2; MT-ND4; MT-ND4L; MT-ND5; MT-ND6
OMIM®: 535000
HPO: HP:0001112

Definition

Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized. [from GeneReviews]

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
LHON presents in midlife as acute or subacute central vision loss leading to central scotoma and blindness. The disease has been associated with many missense mutations in the mtDNA that can act autonomously or in association with each other to cause the disease. The 18 allelic variants are MTND6*LDYT14459A (516006.0002); MTND4*LHON11778A (516003.0001); MTND1*LHON3460A (516000.0001); MTND6*LHON14484C (516006.0001); MTCYB*LHON15257A (516020.0001); MTCO3*LHON9438A (516050.0001); MTCO3*LHON9804A (516050.0002 ); MTND5*LHON13730A (516005.0002); MTND1*LHON4160C (516000.0002); MTND2*LHON5244A (516001.0002); MTCOI*LHON7444A (516030.0001); MTND1*LHON3394C (516000.0004); MTND5*LHON13708A (516005.0001); MTCYB*LHON15812A (516020.0002); MTND2*LHON4917G (516001.0001); MTND1*LHON4216C (516000.0003); MTND1*LHON4136G (516000.0002); MTATP6*LHON9101C (516060.0003); MTND4L*LHON10663C (516004.0002). The first 17 of these variants are summarized in Table M1, MIM12. As pointed out by Riordan-Eva and Harding (1995), although the plethora of mtDNA mutations identified in families with LHON had resulted in confusion as to the pathogenic significance of each mutation, it had been established that the 3 primary mutations at basepairs 11778 (516003.0001), 3460 (516000.0001), and 14484 (516006.0001) are present in at least 90% of families. The correlation between the 14484 mutation and a good visual prognosis provides not only hope for affected patients, but also an approach for further research into the pathogenesis of LHON. Yu-Wai-Man et al. (2009) provided a detailed review of LHON and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (OPA1; 165500), with emphasis on the selective vulnerability of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction in both disorders.  http://www.omim.org/entry/535000
From GHR
Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited form of vision loss. Although this condition usually begins in a person's teens or twenties, rare cases may appear in early childhood or later in adulthood. For unknown reasons, males are affected much more often than females.Blurring and clouding of vision are usually the first symptoms of LHON. These vision problems may begin in one eye or simultaneously in both eyes; if vision loss starts in one eye, the other eye is usually affected within several weeks or months. Over time, vision in both eyes worsens with a severe loss of sharpness (visual acuity) and color vision. This condition mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. Vision loss results from the death of cells in the nerve that relays visual information from the eyes to the brain (the optic nerve). Although central vision gradually improves in a small percentage of cases, in most cases the vision loss is profound and permanent.Vision loss is typically the only symptom of LHON; however, some families with additional signs and symptoms have been reported. In these individuals, the condition is described as "LHON plus." In addition to vision loss, the features of LHON plus can include movement disorders, tremors, and abnormalities of the electrical signals that control the heartbeat (cardiac conduction defects). Some affected individuals develop features similar to multiple sclerosis, which is a chronic disorder characterized by muscle weakness, poor coordination, numbness, and a variety of other health problems.  http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/leber-hereditary-optic-neuropathy

Clinical features

Arrhythmia
MedGen UID:
2039
Concept ID:
C0003811
Finding
An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat. It means that your heart beats too quickly, too slowly, or with an irregular pattern. When the heart beats faster than normal, it is called tachycardia. When the heart beats too slowly, it is called bradycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and fast heart beat. Many factors can affect your heart's rhythm, such as having had a heart attack, smoking, congenital heart defects, and stress. Some substances or medicines may also cause arrhythmias. . Symptoms of arrhythmias include. -Fast or slow heart beat. -Skipping beats. -Lightheadedness or dizziness. -Chest pain. -Shortness of breath . -Sweating . Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have an arrhythmia. Treatment to restore a normal heart rhythm may include medicines, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker, or sometimes surgery. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.
Central retinal vessel vascular tortuosity
MedGen UID:
867211
Concept ID:
C4021569
Finding
The presence of an increased number of twists and turns of retinal blood vessels (arteries, arterioles, veins, venules).
Optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
18180
Concept ID:
C0029124
Disease or Syndrome
Atrophy of the optic nerve. Optic atrophy results from the death of the retinal ganglion cell axons that comprise the optic nerve and manifesting as a pale optic nerve on fundoscopy.
Papilledema
MedGen UID:
10565
Concept ID:
C0030353
Finding
Papilledema refers to edema (swelling) of the optic disc secondary to any factor which increases cerebral spinal fluid pressure.
Centrocecal scotoma
MedGen UID:
82870
Concept ID:
C0271196
Finding
A scotoma (area of diminished vision within the visual field) located between the central point of fixation and the blind spot with a roughly horizontal oval shape.
Optic disc pallor
MedGen UID:
108218
Concept ID:
C0554970
Finding
A pale yellow discoloration of the optic disk (the area of the optic nerve head in the retina). The optic disc normally has a pinkish hue with a central yellowish depression.
Leber optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
182973
Concept ID:
C0917796
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized.
Abnormal vision
MedGen UID:
784038
Concept ID:
C3665386
Finding
Disturbance of eyesight.
Optic neuropathy
MedGen UID:
854546
Concept ID:
C3887709
Disease or Syndrome
Damage to the optic nerve.
Central retinal vessel vascular tortuosity
MedGen UID:
867211
Concept ID:
C4021569
Finding
The presence of an increased number of twists and turns of retinal blood vessels (arteries, arterioles, veins, venules).
Large central visual field defect
MedGen UID:
871312
Concept ID:
C4025800
Finding
Sudden loss of visual acuity
MedGen UID:
871315
Concept ID:
C4025803
Finding
Severe loss of visual acuity within hours or days. This is characteristic of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.
Cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
849
Concept ID:
C0007758
Sign or Symptom
Cerebellar ataxia refers to ataxia due to dysfunction of the cerebellum. This causes a variety of elementary neurological deficits including asynergy (lack of coordination between muscles, limbs and joints), dysmetria (lack of ability to judge distances that can lead to under- oder overshoot in grasping movements), and dysdiadochokinesia (inability to perform rapid movements requiring antagonizing muscle groups to be switched on and off repeatedly).
Dystonia
MedGen UID:
3940
Concept ID:
C0013421
Sign or Symptom
Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive movements and/or postures. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be associated with tremor. Dystonia is often initiated or worsened by voluntary action and associated with overflow muscle activation. Dystonia can be classified clinically according to age of onset, body distribution, temporal pattern, and associated features (i.e., isolated dystonia – in which it is the only motor feature except tremor; combined dystonia – in which another movement disorder is present; or complex dystonia – in which other neurologic or systemic manifestations are present).
Headache
MedGen UID:
9149
Concept ID:
C0018681
Sign or Symptom
Almost everyone has had a headache. Headache is the most common form of pain. It's a major reason people miss days at work or school or visit the doctor. The most common type of headache is a tension headache. Tension headaches are due to tight muscles in your shoulders, neck, scalp and jaw. They are often related to stress, depression or anxiety. You are more likely to get tension headaches if you work too much, don't get enough sleep, miss meals, or use alcohol. Other common types of headaches include migraines, cluster headaches, and sinus headaches. Most people can feel much better by making lifestyle changes, learning ways to relax and taking pain relievers. Not all headaches require a doctor's attention. But sometimes headaches warn of a more serious disorder. Let your health care provider know if you have sudden, severe headaches. Get medical help right away if you have a headache after a blow to your head, or if you have a headache along with a stiff neck, fever, confusion, loss of consciousness, or pain in the eye or ear. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
Polyneuropathy
MedGen UID:
57502
Concept ID:
C0152025
Disease or Syndrome
A generalized disorder of peripheral nerves.
Postural tremor
MedGen UID:
66696
Concept ID:
C0234378
Sign or Symptom
A type of tremors that is triggered by holding a limb in a fixed position.
Bilateral basal ganglia lesions
MedGen UID:
870485
Concept ID:
C4024932
Finding
Myopathy
MedGen UID:
10135
Concept ID:
C0026848
Disease or Syndrome
Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. . Causes of muscle disorders include. -Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis . -A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy. -Some cancers. -Inflammation, such as myositis. -Diseases of nerves that affect muscles. -Infections. -Certain medicines. Sometimes the cause is not known.
Abnormality of metabolism/homeostasis
MedGen UID:
867398
Concept ID:
C4021768
Finding
Central retinal vessel vascular tortuosity
MedGen UID:
867211
Concept ID:
C4021569
Finding
The presence of an increased number of twists and turns of retinal blood vessels (arteries, arterioles, veins, venules).

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy
MedGen UID:
57960
Concept ID:
C0162666
Disease or Syndrome
A heterogenous group of disorders characterized by alterations of mitochondrial metabolism that result in muscle and nervous system dysfunction. These are often multisystemic and vary considerably in age at onset (usually in the first or second decade of life), distribution of affected muscles, severity, and course. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp984-5)
Juvenile myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis AND stroke
MedGen UID:
56485
Concept ID:
C0162671
Disease or Syndrome
MELAS syndrome, comprising mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes, is a genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with a variable clinical phenotype. The disorder is accompanied by features of central nervous system involvement, including seizures, hemiparesis, hemianopsia, cortical blindness, and episodic vomiting (Pavlakis et al., 1984; Montagna et al., 1988). Other mitochondrial encephalomyopathies include Leigh syndrome (LS; 256000), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS; 530000), MERRF syndrome (545000), and Leber optic atrophy (535000).
Myoclonus with epilepsy with ragged red fibers
MedGen UID:
56486
Concept ID:
C0162672
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare mitochondrial abnormality characterized by myoclonic epilepsy and the microscopic finding of ragged-red fibers in muscle tissues.
Cytochrome-c oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
75662
Concept ID:
C0268237
Congenital Abnormality
Complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase; EC 1.9.3.1) is the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain and consists of 13 polypeptide subunits, 3 of which are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The 3 mitochondrially encoded proteins in the cytochrome oxidase complex are the actual catalytic subunits that carry out the electron transport function (Saraste, 1983). See 123995 for discussion of some of the nuclear-encoded subunits. Shoubridge (2001) provided a comprehensive review of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and noted that most isolated COX deficiencies are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes; mutations in the mtDNA-encoded COX subunit genes are relatively rare.
Exercise intolerance
MedGen UID:
603270
Concept ID:
C0424551
Finding
A reduction in the ability to perform or withstand activities that induce physical or mental exertion.
Multisystem disorder
MedGen UID:
107853
Concept ID:
C0559758
Disease or Syndrome
Leber optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
182973
Concept ID:
C0917796
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized.
Colorectal Cancer
MedGen UID:
287122
Concept ID:
C1527249
Neoplastic Process
The colon and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of the large intestine. It is common in both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more likely to get it if you have colorectal polyps, a family history of colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, eat a diet high in fat, or smoke. Symptoms of colorectal cancer include. -Diarrhea or constipation. -A feeling that your bowel does not empty completely. -Blood (either bright red or very dark) in your stool. -Stools that are narrower than usual. -Frequent gas pains or cramps, or feeling full or bloated. -Weight loss with no known reason. -Fatigue. -Nausea or vomiting. Because you may not have symptoms at first, it's important to have screening tests. Everyone over 50 should get screened. Tests include colonoscopy and tests for blood in the stool. Treatments for colorectal cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination. Surgery can usually cure it when it is found early. NIH: National Cancer Institute.
Infantile histiocytoid cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
310844
Concept ID:
C1708371
Disease or Syndrome
Histiocytoid cardiomyopathy, which was initially described by Voth (1962), goes by various names, including infantile xanthomatous cardiomyopathy (MacMahon, 1971), focal lipid cardiomyopathy (Bove and Schwartz, 1973), oncocytic cardiomyopathy (Silver et al., 1980), infantile cardiomyopathy with histiocytoid change (Ferrans et al., 1976), and foamy myocardial transformation of infancy (Yatani et al., 1988). The disorder is a rare but distinctive entity of infancy and childhood characterized by the presence of characteristic pale granular foamy histiocyte-like cells within the myocardium. It usually affects children younger than 2 years of age, with a clear predominance of females over males. Infants present with dysrhythmia or cardiac arrest, and the clinical course is usually fulminant, sometimes simulating sudden infant death syndrome (Andreu et al., 2000).
Aminoglycoside-induced deafness
MedGen UID:
374074
Concept ID:
C1838854
Disease or Syndrome
Nonsyndromic mitochondrial hearing loss and deafness is characterized by moderate-to-profound hearing loss and a pathogenic variant in either MT-RNR1 or MT-TS1. Pathogenic variants in MT-RNR1 can be associated with predisposition to aminoglycoside ototoxicity and/or late-onset sensorineural hearing loss. Pathogenic variants in MT-TS1 are usually associated with childhood onset of sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing loss associated with aminoglycoside ototoxicity is bilateral and severe to profound, occurring within a few days to weeks after administration of any amount (even a single dose) of an aminoglycoside antibiotic such as gentamycin, tobramycin, amikacin, kanamycin, or streptomycin. Although hearing loss associated with pathogenic variants in MT-TS1 is considered nonsyndromic, the m.7445A>G substitution is also associated with palmoplantar keratoderma (scaling, hyperkeratosis, and honeycomb appearance of the skin of the palms, soles, and heels) in some families.
Myoglobinuria, recurrent
MedGen UID:
333201
Concept ID:
C1838877
Finding
Recurring episodes of myoglobinuria, i.e., of the presence of myoglobin in the urine. This is usually a consequence of rhabdomyolysis, i.e., of the destruction of muscle tissue.
Leigh syndrome due to mitochondrial complex I deficiency
MedGen UID:
333220
Concept ID:
C1838951
Disease or Syndrome
STRIATAL NECROSIS, BILATERAL, WITH DYSTONIA
MedGen UID:
325555
Concept ID:
C1838954
Gene or Genome
Mitochondrial complex I deficiency
MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated complex I deficiency is the most common enzymatic defect of the oxidative phosphorylation disorders (McFarland et al., 2004; Kirby et al., 2004). It causes a wide range of clinical disorders, ranging from lethal neonatal disease to adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. Phenotypes include macrocephaly with progressive leukodystrophy, nonspecific encephalopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, liver disease, Leigh syndrome (256000), Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (535000), and some forms of Parkinson disease (see 556500) (Loeffen et al., 2000; Pitkanen et al., 1996; Robinson, 1998). Genetic Heterogeneity of Complex I Deficiency Mitochondrial complex I deficiency shows extreme genetic heterogeneity and can be caused by mutation in nuclear-encoded genes or in mitochondrial-encoded genes. There are no obvious genotype-phenotype correlations, and inference of the underlying basis from the clinical or biochemical presentation is difficult, if not impossible (summary by Haack et al., 2012). However, the majority of cases are caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes (Loeffen et al., 2000; Triepels et al., 2001). Complex I deficiency with autosomal recessive inheritance results from mutation in nuclear-encoded subunit genes, including NDUFV1 (161015), NDUFV2 (600532), NDUFS1 (157655), NDUFS2 (602985), NDUFS3 (603846), NDUFS4 (602694), NDUFS6 (603848), NDUFS7 (601825), NDUFS8 (602141), NDUFA2 (602137), NDUFA11 (612638), NDUFAF3 (612911), NDUFA10 (603835), NDUFB3 (603839), NDUFB9 (601445), and the complex I assembly genes B17.2L (609653), HRPAP20 (611776), C20ORF7 (612360), NUBPL (613621), and NDUFAF1 (606934). The disorder can also be caused by mutation in other nuclear-encoded genes, including FOXRED1 (613622), ACAD9 (611103; see 611126), and MTFMT (611766; see 256000). X-linked inheritance is observed with mutations in the NDUFA1 gene (300078). Complex I deficiency with mitochondrial inheritance has been associated with mutation in 6 mitochondrial-encoded components of complex I: MTND1 (516000), MTND2 (516001), MTND3 (516002), MTND4 (516003), MTND5 (516005), MTND6 (516006). Most of these patients have a phenotype of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON; 535000) or Leigh syndrome (256000). Features of complex I deficiency may also be caused by mutation in other mitochondrial genes, including MTTS2 (590085).
Leber hereditary optic neuropathy with dystonia
MedGen UID:
333240
Concept ID:
C1839040
Disease or Syndrome
OBESITY, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO (allelic variant)
MedGen UID:
356231
Concept ID:
C1866432
Gene or Genome
Deafness, nonsyndromic sensorineural, mitochondrial
MedGen UID:
463247
Concept ID:
C3151897
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found to be associated with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Matrilineal relatives within and among families carrying certain pathogenic mitochondrial mutations exhibit a wide range of penetrance, severity, and age of onset of hearing loss, indicating that the mitochondrial mutations by themselves are not sufficient to produce a deafness phenotype. Modifier factors, such as nuclear and mitochondrial genes, or environmental factors, such as exposure to aminoglycosides, appear to modulate the phenotypic manifestations (summary by Tang et al., 2007).
PARKINSON DISEASE 6, MODIFIER OF
MedGen UID:
865035
Concept ID:
C4016598
Finding
EXERCISE INTOLERANCE, CARDIOMYOPATHY, AND SEPTOOPTIC DYSPLASIA
MedGen UID:
865036
Concept ID:
C4016599
Finding
PARKINSONISM/MELAS OVERLAP SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
865037
Concept ID:
C4016600
Finding
SIDEROBLASTIC ANEMIA, ACQUIRED IDIOPATHIC
MedGen UID:
865038
Concept ID:
C4016601
Finding
CYTOCHROME c OXIDASE I DEFICIENCY
MedGen UID:
865039
Concept ID:
C4016602
Finding
SEIZURES AND LACTIC ACIDOSIS
MedGen UID:
865040
Concept ID:
C4016603
Finding
MITOCHONDRIAL COMPLEX IV DEFICIENCY WITH RECURRENT MYOGLOBINURIA
MedGen UID:
866063
Concept ID:
C4017626
Finding

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Kulkarni R, Reither A, Thomas RA, Tucker JD
Mutat Res 2009 Apr 26;663(1-2):46-51. Epub 2009 Feb 4 doi: 10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2009.01.004. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 19428369

Diagnosis

Kulkarni R, Reither A, Thomas RA, Tucker JD
Mutat Res 2009 Apr 26;663(1-2):46-51. Epub 2009 Feb 4 doi: 10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2009.01.004. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 19428369
McLeod JG, Low PA, Morgan JA
Neurology 1978 Feb;28(2):179-84. PMID: 563998

Clinical prediction guides

Kulkarni R, Reither A, Thomas RA, Tucker JD
Mutat Res 2009 Apr 26;663(1-2):46-51. Epub 2009 Feb 4 doi: 10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2009.01.004. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 19428369

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