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MedGen for PubMed (Select 9932237)

Items: 14

1.

Turner syndrome

Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in females. The most common feature of Turner syndrome is short stature, which becomes evident by about age 5. An early loss of ovarian function (ovarian hypofunction or premature ovarian failure) is also very common. The ovaries develop normally at first, but egg cells (oocytes) usually die prematurely and most ovarian tissue degenerates before birth. Many affected girls do not undergo puberty unless they receive hormone therapy, and most are unable to conceive (infertile). A small percentage of females with Turner syndrome retain normal ovarian function through young adulthood. About 30 percent of females with Turner syndrome have extra folds of skin on the neck (webbed neck), a low hairline at the back of the neck, puffiness or swelling (lymphedema) of the hands and feet, skeletal abnormalities, or kidney problems. One third to one half of individuals with Turner syndrome are born with a heart defect, such as a narrowing of the large artery leaving the heart (coarctation of the aorta) or abnormalities of the valve that connects the aorta with the heart (the aortic valve). Complications associated with these heart defects can be life-threatening. Most girls and women with Turner syndrome have normal intelligence. Developmental delays, nonverbal learning disabilities, and behavioral problems are possible, although these characteristics vary among affected individuals.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
21734
Concept ID:
C0041408
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
2.

Multiple fibrofolliculomas

The clinical characteristics of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) include cutaneous manifestations (fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas/angiofibromas, perifollicular fibromas, and acrochordons), pulmonary cysts/history of pneumothorax, and various types of renal tumors. Disease severity can vary significantly even within the same family. Skin lesions typically appear during the third and fourth decades of life and typically increase in size and number with age. Lung cysts are mostly bilateral and multifocal; most individuals are asymptomatic but at high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax. Individuals with BHDS are at a sevenfold increased risk for renal tumors that are typically bilateral and multifocal and usually slow growing; median age of tumor diagnosis is 48 years. The most common renal tumors are a hybrid of oncocytoma and chromophobe histologic cell types (so-called oncocytic hybrid tumor) and chromophobe histologic cell types. Some families have renal tumor and/or autosomal dominant spontaneous pneumothorax without cutaneous manifestations. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
91070
Concept ID:
C0346010
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Sex-linked hereditary disorder

Disorders occurring in either sex and which are transmitted by genes in the sex chromosomes. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
183658
Concept ID:
C0949683
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Intellectual disability, profound

IQ below 20. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
43816
Concept ID:
C0020796
Finding; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
6.

Disorder of sex development

Abnormalities in the development of the GONADS, the genital tracts, the external GENITALIA, and gender-specific behavior. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
20725
Concept ID:
C0036875
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
7.

Fragile X syndrome

FMR1-related disorders include fragile X syndrome, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), and FMR1-related primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). Fragile X syndrome occurs in individuals with an FMR1 full mutation or other loss-of-function mutation and is nearly always characterized by moderate intellectual disability in affected males and mild intellectual disability in affected females. Because FMR1 mutations are complex alterations involving non-classic gene-disrupting alterations (trinucleotide repeat expansion) and abnormal gene methylation, affected individuals occasionally have an atypical presentation with an IQ above 70, the traditional demarcation denoting intellectual disability (previously referred to as mental retardation). Males with an FMR1 full mutation accompanied by aberrant methylation may have a characteristic appearance (large head, long face, prominent forehead and chin, protruding ears), connective tissue findings (joint laxity), and large testes after puberty. Behavioral abnormalities, sometimes including autism spectrum disorder, are common. FXTAS occurs in males (and some females) who have an FMR1 premutation and is characterized by late-onset, progressive cerebellar ataxia and intention tremor. FMR1-related POI (age at cessation of menses <40 years) occurs in approximately 20% of females who have an FMR1 premutation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
8912
Concept ID:
C0016667
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
8.

Intellectual functioning disability

A developmental disorder characterized by less than average intelligence and significant limitations in adaptive behavior with onset before the age of 18. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7544
Concept ID:
C0025362
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
9.

Malformation of the heart

A congenital heart defect is a problem with the structure of the heart. It is present at birth. Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect. The defects can involve the walls of the heart, the valves of the heart, and the arteries and veins near the heart. They can disrupt the normal flow of blood through the heart. The blood flow can slow down, go in the wrong direction or to the wrong place, or be blocked completely. Doctors use a physical exam and special heart tests to diagnose congenital heart defects. They often find severe defects during pregnancy or soon after birth. Signs and symptoms of severe defects in newborns include. -Rapid breathing. -Cyanosis - a bluish tint to the skin, lips, and fingernails. -Fatigue. -Poor blood circulation. Many congenital heart defects cause few or no signs and symptoms. They are often not diagnosed until children are older. Many children with congenital heart defects don't need treatment, but others do. Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6748
Concept ID:
C0018798
Congenital Abnormality
10.

Heart disease

If you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. It is also a major cause of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease and happens slowly over time. It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Other kinds of heart problems may happen to the valves in the heart, or the heart may not pump well and cause heart failure. Some people are born with heart disease. You can help reduce your risk of heart disease by taking steps to control factors that put you at greater risk:. - Control your blood pressure. - Lower your cholesterol. - Don't smoke. - Get enough exercise. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5458
Concept ID:
C0018799
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Disorder of endocrine system

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include. -Growth and development. -Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature . -Sexual function. -Reproduction. -Mood. If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4043
Concept ID:
C0014130
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Congenital chromosomal disease

Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
3441
Concept ID:
C0008626
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder affecting the heart or the vessels (arteries, veins and lymph vessels). Representative examples of non-neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocarditis and hypertension. Representative examples of neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocardial myxoma and angiosarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Mental retardation 9, X-linked

Nonsyndromic mental retardation. [from MCA/MR]

MedGen UID:
167112
Concept ID:
C0796215
Disease or Syndrome
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