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Items: 18

1.

Marfan syndrome

Marfan syndrome is a systemic disorder of connective tissue with a high degree of clinical variability. Cardinal manifestations involve the ocular, skeletal, and cardiovascular systems. FBN1 pathogenic variants associate with a broad phenotypic continuum, ranging from isolated features of Marfan syndrome to neonatal presentation of severe and rapidly progressive disease in multiple organ systems. Myopia is the most common ocular feature; displacement of the lens from the center of the pupil, seen in approximately 60% of affected individuals, is a hallmark feature. People with Marfan syndrome are at increased risk for retinal detachment, glaucoma, and early cataract formation. The skeletal system involvement is characterized by bone overgrowth and joint laxity. The extremities are disproportionately long for the size of the trunk (dolichostenomelia). Overgrowth of the ribs can push the sternum in (pectus excavatum) or out (pectus carinatum). Scoliosis is common and can be mild or severe and progressive. The major sources of morbidity and early mortality in the Marfan syndrome relate to the cardiovascular system. Cardiovascular manifestations include dilatation of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva, a predisposition for aortic tear and rupture, mitral valve prolapse with or without regurgitation, tricuspid valve prolapse, and enlargement of the proximal pulmonary artery. With proper management, the life expectancy of someone with Marfan syndrome approximates that of the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
44287
Concept ID:
C0024796
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Aortic aneurysm

An aneurysm is a bulge or ballooning in the wall of an artery. Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood from the heart to other parts of the body. If an aneurysm grows large, it can burst and cause dangerous bleeding or even death. Most aneurysms are in the aorta, the main artery that runs from the heart through the chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm:. -Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest. -Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen. Most aneurysms are found during tests done for other reasons. Some people are at high risk for aneurysms. It is important for them to get screening, because aneurysms can develop and become large before causing any symptoms Screening is recommended for people between the ages of 65 and 75 if they have a family history, or if they are men who have smoked. Doctors use imaging tests to find aneurysms. Medicines and surgery are the two main treatments. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
362
Concept ID:
C0003486
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
3.

Aortic aneurysm

MedGen UID:
776560
Concept ID:
C2072946
Finding
4.

Ascending aortic aneurysm

A bulging, weakened area in the wall of the ascending thoracic aorta. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505305
Concept ID:
CN002392
Finding
5.

Ectopia lentis

Dislocation or malposition of the crystalline lens of the eye. A partial displacement (or dislocation) of the lens is described as a subluxation of the lens, while a complete displacement is termed luxation of the lens. A complete displacement occurs if the lens is completely outside the patellar fossa of the lens, either in the anterior chamber, in the vitreous, or directly on the retina. If the lens is partially displaced but still contained within the lens space, then it is termed subluxation. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504717
Concept ID:
CN001016
Finding
6.

Aneurysm

Abnormal outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of an atery, vein or the heart. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428304
Concept ID:
CN002379
Finding
7.

Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome

Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) is characterized by: craniosynostosis of the coronal, sagittal, or lambdoid sutures; dolichocephaly; distinctive craniofacial features; skeletal changes (dolichostenomelia, arachnodactyly, camptodactyly, pes planus, pectus excavatum or carinatum, scoliosis, joint hypermobility or contractures and C1/C2 spine malformation); neurologic abnormalities; intellectual disability; and brain anomalies (hydrocephalus, dilatation of the lateral ventricles, and Chiari 1 malformation). Cardiovascular anomalies may include mitral valve prolapse, mitral regurgitation/incompetence, aortic regurgitation and aortic root dilatation. Minimal subcutaneous fat, abdominal wall defects, myopia, and cryptorchidism in males, are also characteristic findings. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
231160
Concept ID:
C1321551
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
8.

Ascending aortic aneurysm

A bulging, weakened area in the wall of the ascending thoracic aorta. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
163631
Concept ID:
C0856747
Finding; Pathologic Function
9.

Combined deficiency of sialidase AND beta galactosidase

Galactosialidosis is a lysosomal storage disease associated with a combined deficiency of beta-galactosidase (611458) and neuraminidase (608272), secondary to a defect in protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). All patients have clinical manifestations typical of a lysosomal disorder, such as coarse facies, cherry red spots, vertebral changes, foam cells in the bone marrow, and vacuolated lymphocytes. Three phenotypic subtypes are recognized. The early infantile form is associated with fetal hydrops, edema, ascites, visceromegaly, skeletal dysplasia, and early death. The late infantile type is characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, growth retardation, cardiac involvement, and rare occurrence of neurologic signs. The juvenile/adult form is characterized by myoclonus, ataxia, angiokeratoma, mental retardation, neurologic deterioration, absence of visceromegaly, and long survival. The majority of reported patients belong to the juvenile/adult group and are mainly of Japanese origin (summary by d'Azzo et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82779
Concept ID:
C0268233
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Aneurysm

An aneurysm is a bulge or ballooning in the wall of an artery. Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood from the heart to other parts of the body. If an aneurysm grows large, it can burst and cause dangerous bleeding or even death. . Most aneurysms occur in the aorta, the main artery that runs from the heart through the chest and abdomen. Aneurysms also can happen in arteries in the brain, heart and other parts of the body. If an aneurysm in the brain bursts, it causes a stroke. Aneurysms can develop and become large before causing any symptoms. Often doctors can stop aneurysms from bursting if they find and treat them early. They use imaging tests to find aneurysms. Often aneurysms are found by chance during tests done for other reasons. Medicines and surgery are the two main treatments for aneurysms. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8076
Concept ID:
C0002940
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Multiple congenital anomalies

MedGen UID:
7806
Concept ID:
C0000772
Congenital Abnormality
12.

Heart, malformation of

A congenital heart defect is a problem with the structure of the heart. It is present at birth. Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect. The defects can involve the walls of the heart, the valves of the heart, and the arteries and veins near the heart. They can disrupt the normal flow of blood through the heart. The blood flow can slow down, go in the wrong direction or to the wrong place, or be blocked completely. Doctors use a physical exam and special heart tests to diagnose congenital heart defects. They often find severe defects during pregnancy or soon after birth. Signs and symptoms of severe defects in newborns include. -Rapid breathing. -Cyanosis - a bluish tint to the skin, lips, and fingernails. -Fatigue. -Poor blood circulation. Many congenital heart defects cause few or no signs and symptoms. They are often not diagnosed until children are older. Many children with congenital heart defects don't need treatment, but others do. Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6748
Concept ID:
C0018798
Congenital Abnormality
13.

Heart disease

If you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. It is also a major cause of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease and happens slowly over time. It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Other kinds of heart problems may happen to the valves in the heart, or the heart may not pump well and cause heart failure. Some people are born with heart disease. You can help reduce your risk of heart disease by taking steps to control factors that put you at greater risk:. - Control your blood pressure. - Lower your cholesterol. - Don't smoke. - Get enough exercise. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5458
Concept ID:
C0018799
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Edinburgh malformation syndrome

A syndrome reported in an Edinburgh family in which five infants (four female and one male) were found to have a characteristic facial appearance, hydrocephalus, and psychomotor retardation. Some characteristics of this syndrome are similar to those of the de Lange syndrome 1. [from MCA/MR]

MedGen UID:
167084
Concept ID:
C0795933
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Marfan syndrome, neonatal

MedGen UID:
864491
Concept ID:
C4016054
Finding
17.

Intracranial berry aneurysm

MedGen UID:
833853
Concept ID:
CN230268
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Blepharoptosis myopia ectopia lentis

MedGen UID:
400006
Concept ID:
C1862259
Disease or Syndrome
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