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Results: 1 to 20 of 36

1.

Ichthyosis

Any of several generalized skin disorders characterized by dryness, roughness, and scaliness, due to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum epidermis. Most are genetic, but some are acquired, developing in association with other systemic disease or genetic syndrome. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7002
Concept ID:
C0020757
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma

An `ichthyosiform abnormality of the skin` (HP:0008064) with `congenital onset` (HP:0003577). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506069
Concept ID:
CN006510
Finding
3.

Congenital ichthyosis of skin

Although most neonates with autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) are collodion babies, the clinical presentation and severity of ARCI may vary significantly, ranging from harlequin ichthyosis, the most severe and often fatal form, to lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and (nonbullous) congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). Although these phenotypes are now recognized to fall on a continuum, the phenotypic descriptions are clinically useful for clarification of prognosis and management. Infants with harlequin ichthyosis are usually born prematurely and are encased in thick, hard, armor-like plates of cornified skin that severely restrict movement. Life-threatening complications in the immediate postnatal period include respiratory distress, feeding problems, and systemic infection. Collodion babies are born with a taut, shiny, translucent or opaque membrane that encases the entire body and lasts for days to weeks. LI and CIE are seemingly distinct phenotypes: classic, severe lamellar ichthyosis (LI) with dark brown, plate-like scale with no erythroderma and CIE with finer whiter scale and underlying generalized redness of the skin. Affected individuals with severe involvement can have ectropion, eclabium, scarring alopecia involving the scalp and eyebrows, and palmar and plantar keratoderma. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
448008
Concept ID:
CN043570
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Ichthyosis

An abnormality of the skin characterized the presence of excessive amounts of dry surface scales on the skin resulting from an abnormality of keratinization. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
429191
Concept ID:
CN007091
Finding
5.

Autosomal recessive inheritance

Autosomal recessive inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur only when mutations are present in both copies of a given gene (i.e., the person is homozygous for a mutation, or carries two different mutations of the same gene, a state referred to as compound heterozygosity). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
6.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Chronic granulomatous disease

A recessive X-linked defect of leukocyte function in which phagocytic cells ingest but fail to digest bacteria, resulting in recurring bacterial infections with granuloma formation. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5377
Concept ID:
C0018203
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Coagulation factor XIII

A fibrin-stabilizing plasma enzyme (TRANSGLUTAMINASES) that is activated by THROMBIN and CALCIUM to form FACTOR XIIIA. It is important for stabilizing the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) which culminates the coagulation cascade. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5107
Concept ID:
C0015528
Pharmacologic Substance
9.

Lamellar ichthyosis

MedGen UID:
776931
Concept ID:
CN186176
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Erythroderma

An inflammatory exfoliative dermatosis involving nearly all of the surface of the skin. Erythroderma develops suddenly. A patchy erythema may generalize and spread to affect most of the skin. Scaling may appear in 2-6 days and be accompanied by hot, red, dry skin, malaise, and fever. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504688
Concept ID:
CN000955
Finding
11.

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 2

Although most neonates with autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) are collodion babies, the clinical presentation and severity of ARCI may vary significantly, ranging from harlequin ichthyosis, the most severe and often fatal form, to lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and (nonbullous) congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). Although these phenotypes are now recognized to fall on a continuum, the phenotypic descriptions are clinically useful for clarification of prognosis and management. Infants with harlequin ichthyosis are usually born prematurely and are encased in thick, hard, armor-like plates of cornified skin that severely restrict movement. Life-threatening complications in the immediate postnatal period include respiratory distress, feeding problems, and systemic infection. Collodion babies are born with a taut, shiny, translucent or opaque membrane that encases the entire body and lasts for days to weeks. LI and CIE are seemingly distinct phenotypes: classic, severe lamellar ichthyosis (LI) with dark brown, plate-like scale with no erythroderma and CIE with finer whiter scale and underlying generalized redness of the skin. Affected individuals with severe involvement can have ectropion, eclabium, scarring alopecia involving the scalp and eyebrows, and palmar and plantar keratoderma. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
383774
Concept ID:
C1855792
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 1

Although most neonates with autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) are collodion babies, the clinical presentation and severity of ARCI may vary significantly, ranging from harlequin ichthyosis, the most severe and often fatal form, to lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and (nonbullous) congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). Although these phenotypes are now recognized to fall on a continuum, the phenotypic descriptions are clinically useful for clarification of prognosis and management. Infants with harlequin ichthyosis are usually born prematurely and are encased in thick, hard, armor-like plates of cornified skin that severely restrict movement. Life-threatening complications in the immediate postnatal period include respiratory distress, feeding problems, and systemic infection. Collodion babies are born with a taut, shiny, translucent or opaque membrane that encases the entire body and lasts for days to weeks. LI and CIE are seemingly distinct phenotypes: classic, severe lamellar ichthyosis (LI) with dark brown, plate-like scale with no erythroderma and CIE with finer whiter scale and underlying generalized redness of the skin. Affected individuals with severe involvement can have ectropion, eclabium, scarring alopecia involving the scalp and eyebrows, and palmar and plantar keratoderma. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
43813
Concept ID:
C0020758
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Congenital Nonbullous Ichthyosiform Erythroderma

A chronic, congenital ichthyosis inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Infants are usually born encased in a collodion membrane which sheds within a few weeks. Scaling is generalized and marked with grayish-brown quadrilateral scales, adherent at their centers and free at the edges. In some cases, scales are so thick that they resemble armored plate. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
38180
Concept ID:
C0079154
Congenital Abnormality
14.

Exfoliative dermatitis

The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
3767
Concept ID:
C0011606
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Blood clotting factor

Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
605
Concept ID:
C0005789
Pharmacologic Substance
16.

Amino acid

One of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
250
Concept ID:
C0002520
Pharmacologic Substance
17.

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
18.

Ichthyosiform Erythroderma, Congenital

Designation for several severe forms of ichthyosis, present at birth, that are characterized by hyperkeratotic scaling. Infants may be born encased in a collodion membrane which begins shedding within 24 hours. This is followed in about two weeks by persistent generalized scaling. The forms include bullous (HYPERKERATOSIS, EPIDERMOLYTIC), non-bullous (ICHTHYOSIS, LAMELLAR), wet type, and dry type. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
86936
Concept ID:
C0079583
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases

A collective term for diseases of the skin and its appendages and of connective tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
59786
Concept ID:
C0175166
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Point mutation

A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
56498
Concept ID:
C0162735
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction

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