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Results: 1 to 20 of 29

1.

Osteogenesis imperfecta

COL1A1/2-related osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by fractures with minimal or absent trauma, variable dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), and, in adult years, hearing loss. The clinical features of COL1A1/2-related OI represent a continuum ranging from perinatal lethality to individuals with severe skeletal deformities, mobility impairments, and very short stature to nearly asymptomatic individuals with a mild predisposition to fractures, normal dentition, normal stature, and normal life span. Fractures can occur in any bone, but are most common in the extremities. DI is characterized by grey or brown teeth that may appear translucent and wear down and break easily. COL1A1/2-related OI has been classified into four types (I, II, III, and IV) based on clinical presentation and radiographic findings. This classification system can be helpful in providing information about prognosis and management for a given individual. The four OI types are now referred to as follows: OI type I: classic non-deforming OI with blue sclerae. OI type II: perinatally lethal OI. OI type III: progressively deforming OI. OI type IV: common variable OI with normal sclerae. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
45246
Concept ID:
C0029434
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Marfan's syndrome

Marfan syndrome is a systemic disorder of connective tissue with a high degree of clinical variability. Cardinal manifestations involve the ocular, skeletal, and cardiovascular systems. FBN1 pathogenic variants associate with a broad phenotypic continuum, ranging from isolated features of Marfan syndrome to neonatal presentation of severe and rapidly progressive disease in multiple organ systems. Myopia is the most common ocular feature; displacement of the lens from the center of the pupil, seen in approximately 60% of affected individuals, is a hallmark feature. People with Marfan syndrome are at increased risk for retinal detachment, glaucoma, and early cataract formation. The skeletal system involvement is characterized by bone overgrowth and joint laxity. The extremities are disproportionately long for the size of the trunk (dolichostenomelia). Overgrowth of the ribs can push the sternum in (pectus excavatum) or out (pectus carinatum). Scoliosis is common and can be mild or severe and progressive. The major sources of morbidity and early mortality in the Marfan syndrome relate to the cardiovascular system. Cardiovascular manifestations include dilatation of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva, a predisposition for aortic tear and rupture, mitral valve prolapse with or without regurgitation, tricuspid valve prolapse, and enlargement of the proximal pulmonary artery. With proper management, the life expectancy of someone with Marfan syndrome approximates that of the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
44287
Concept ID:
C0024796
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of disorders that affect connective tissues, which are tissues that support the skin, bones, blood vessels, and other organs. Defects in connective tissues cause the signs and symptoms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, which vary from mildly loose joints to life-threatening complications. In the past, there were more than 10 recognized types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. In 1997, researchers proposed a simpler classification that reduced the number of major types to six and gave them descriptive names: the arthrochalasia type, the classic type, the dermatosparaxis type, the hypermobility type, the kyphoscoliosis type, and the vascular type. Other forms of the condition may exist, but they have been reported only in single families or are not well characterized. Although all types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome affect the joints and many also affect the skin, features vary by type. An unusually large range of joint movement (hypermobility) occurs with most forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, particularly the hypermobility type. Infants with hypermobile joints often appear to have weak muscle tone, which can delay the development of motor skills such as sitting, standing, and walking. The loose joints are unstable and prone to dislocation, chronic pain, and early-onset arthritis. Dislocations involving both hips are a characteristic finding in infants with the arthrochalasia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Many people with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have soft, velvety skin that is highly elastic (stretchy) and fragile. Affected individuals tend to bruise easily, and some types of the condition also cause abnormal scarring. People with the classic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experience wounds that split open with little bleeding and leave scars that widen over time to create characteristic shallow "cigarette paper" scars. The dermatosparaxis type of the disorder is characterized by skin that sags and wrinkles. Extra (redundant) folds of skin may be present as affected children get older. Some forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, notably the vascular and kyphoscoliosis types, can involve serious and potentially life-threatening complications. Blood vessels can tear (rupture) unpredictably, causing internal bleeding, stroke, and shock. The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is also associated with an increased risk of organ rupture, including tearing of the intestine and rupture of the uterus (womb) during pregnancy. People with the kyphoscoliosis form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experience severe, progressive curvature of the spine that can interfere with breathing.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
41720
Concept ID:
C0013720
Congenital Abnormality
4.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis makes your bones weak and more likely to break. Anyone can develop osteoporosis, but it is common in older women. As many as half of all women and a quarter of men older than 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis. Risk factors include : - Getting older . - Being small and thin . - Having a family history of osteoporosis. - Taking certain medicines. - Being a white or Asian woman. - Having osteopenia, which is low bone density. Osteoporosis is a silent disease. You might not know you have it until you break a bone. A bone mineral density test is the best way to check your bone health. To keep bones strong, eat a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, exercise and do not smoke. If needed, medicines can also help. . NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14535
Concept ID:
C0029456
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Osteoporosis

MedGen UID:
776590
Concept ID:
C2911643
Finding
7.

Bone mineral density quantitative trait locus 8

MedGen UID:
394842
Concept ID:
C2678504
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Osteoporosis

Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10498
Concept ID:
C0029458
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Genetic Diseases, Inborn

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Avitene

MedGen UID:
149149
Concept ID:
C0733516
Pharmacologic Substance
11.

Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases

A collective term for diseases of the skin and its appendages and of connective tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
59786
Concept ID:
C0175166
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Disorder of bone

Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly throughout your life. During childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about age 20, you can lose bone faster than you make bone. To have strong bones when you are young, and to prevent bone loss when you are older, you need to get enough calcium, vitamin D and exercise. . There are many kinds of bone problems:: - Low bone density and osteoporosis, which make your bones weak and more likely to break . - Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle . - Paget's disease of bone makes them weak . - Bone disease can make bones easy to break . - Bones can also develop cancer and infections. - Other bone diseases are caused by poor nutrition, genetic factors or problems with the rate of bone growth or rebuilding. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14182
Concept ID:
C0005940
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Osteochondrodysplasia

Abnormal development of cartilage and bone. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10495
Concept ID:
C0029422
Congenital Abnormality
14.

Disorder of musculoskeletal system

condition in which there is a deviation from or interruption of the normal structure or function of any muscles, bones, or cartilages of the body. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
6471
Concept ID:
C0026857
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Dyschondroplasias

MedGen UID:
3933
Concept ID:
C0013366
Congenital Abnormality
16.

Collagen disease

A term previously used to describe chronic diseases of the connective tissue (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis), but now is thought to be more appropriate for diseases associated with defects in collagen, which is a component of the connective tissue. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3157
Concept ID:
C0009326
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Disorder of bone development

condition in which there is a deviation from or interruption of the normal development of bone and bone tissue. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
2309
Concept ID:
C0005941
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Disorder of connective tissue

Connective tissue is the material inside your body that supports many of its parts. It is the cellular glue that gives your tissues their shape and helps keep them strong. It also helps some of your tissues do their work. Cartilage and fat are examples of connective tissue. . There are over 200 disorders that impact connective tissue. Some, like cellulitis, are the result of an infection. Injuries can cause connective tissue disorders, such as scars. Others, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and osteogenesis imperfecta, are genetic. Still others, like scleroderma, have no known cause. Each disorder has its own symptoms and needs different treatment.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1098
Concept ID:
C0009782
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Amino acid

One of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
250
Concept ID:
C0002520
Pharmacologic Substance
20.

Ehlers Danlos syndrome type 4, autosomal dominant

MedGen UID:
488437
Concept ID:
C3494488
Disease or Syndrome

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