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Items: 13

1.

Myxoid liposarcoma

Myxoid liposarcoma is a soft tissue tumor that tends to occur in the limbs (especially the thigh) of patients ranging in age from 35 to 55 years. It is defined by the presence of a hypocellular spindle cell proliferation set in a myxoid background, often with mucin pooling. Lipoblasts tend to be small and often monovacuolated and to cluster around vessels or at the periphery of the lesion (review by Dei Tos, 2000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
104903
Concept ID:
C0206634
Neoplastic Process
2.

Chondrosarcoma

A slowly growing malignant neoplasm derived from cartilage cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3054
Concept ID:
C0008479
Neoplastic Process
3.

Chondrosarcoma

A slowly growing malignant neoplasm derived from cartilage cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505973
Concept ID:
CN005888
Finding
4.

Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma

Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare soft tissue neoplasm of chondroblastic origin. The tumors are most commonly found in middle-aged and elderly individuals, are more common among men, and are often detected as deep-seated lesions in the extremities. Despite their relatively low-grade malignancy, recurrence and metastasis may appear many years after the initial diagnosis. Histologic tissue section examination reveals a mixture of cellular and myxoid stromal components (Panagopoulos et al., 2002). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
220892
Concept ID:
C1275278
Neoplastic Process
5.

Sarcoma

Your soft tissues connect, support, or surround other tissues. Examples include your muscles, tendons, fat, and blood vessels. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of these soft tissues. There are many kinds, based on the type of tissue they started in. They may cause a lump or swelling in the soft tissue. Sometimes they spread and can press on nerves and organs, causing problems such as pain or trouble breathing. No one knows exactly what causes these cancers. They are not common, but you have a higher risk if you have been exposed to certain chemicals, have had radiation therapy, or have certain genetic diseases. Doctors diagnose soft tissue sarcomas with a biopsy. Treatments include surgery to remove the tumor, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
224714
Concept ID:
C1261473
Neoplastic Process
6.

Ewing sarcoma

Ewing sarcoma is a cancerous tumor that occurs in bones or soft tissues, such as cartilage or nerves. There are several types of Ewing sarcoma, including Ewing sarcoma of bone, extraosseous Ewing sarcoma, peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET), and Askin tumor. These tumors are considered to be related because they have similar genetic causes. These types of Ewing sarcoma can be distinguished from one another by the tissue in which the tumor develops. Approximately 87 percent of Ewing sarcomas are Ewing sarcoma of bone, which is a bone tumor that usually occurs in the thigh bones (femurs), pelvis, ribs, or shoulder blades. Extraosseous (or extraskeletal) Ewing sarcoma describes tumors in the soft tissues around bones, such as cartilage. pPNETs occur in nerve tissue and can be found in many parts of the body. A type of pPNET found in the chest is called Askin tumor.Ewing sarcomas most often occur in children and young adults. Affected individuals usually feel stiffness, pain, swelling, or tenderness of the bone or surrounding tissue. Sometimes, there is a lump near the surface of the skin that feels warm and soft to the touch. Often, children have a fever that does not go away. Ewing sarcoma of bone can cause weakening of the involved bone, and affected individuals may have a broken bone with no obvious cause.It is common for Ewing sarcoma to spread to other parts of the body (metastasize), usually to the lungs, to other bones, or to the bone marrow.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
107816
Concept ID:
C0553580
Neoplastic Process
7.

Liposarcoma

Malignant neoplasms which probably originate in primitive mesenchymal stem cell populations differentiating down a lipomatous pathway. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
44177
Concept ID:
C0023827
Neoplastic Process
8.

Primitive neuroectodermal tumor

A tumor that originates in cells from the primitive neural crest. This group of tumors is characteirzed by the presence of primitive cells with elements of neuronal and/or glial differentiation. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
807367
Concept ID:
CN218501
Neoplastic Process
9.

Myxoid liposarcoma

A liposarcoma that contains myxomatous tissue. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506720
Concept ID:
CN168788
Finding
10.

Ewing sarcoma

A malignant tumor of the bone which always arises in the medullary tissue, occurring more often in cylindrical bones. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506718
Concept ID:
CN168774
Finding
11.

Sarcoma

A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells. Bone and soft tissue sarcomas are the main types of sarcoma. Sarcoma is usually highly malignant. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506452
Concept ID:
CN117138
Finding
12.

Neuroectodermal neoplasm

A neoplasm arising in the neuroectoderm, the portion of the ectoderm of the early embryo that gives rise to the central and peripheral nervous systems, including some glial cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
60072
Concept ID:
C0206093
Neoplastic Process
13.

Lipomatous tumor

A benign or malignant tumor composed of adipose (fatty) tissue. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61646
Concept ID:
C0206631
Neoplastic Process
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