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Items: 14

1.

Muscular dystrophy

MedGen UID:
351199
Concept ID:
C1864711
Finding
2.

Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy

Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is characterized by ptosis and swallowing difficulties due to selective involvement of the muscles of the eyelid and pharynx, respectively. The mean age of onset of ptosis is usually 48 years and onset of dysphagia is 50 years. Early symptoms of dysphagia are increased time needed to consume a meal and an acquired avoidance of dry foods. Swallowing difficulties determine prognosis, and increase the risk for potentially life-threatening aspiration pneumonia and poor nutrition. Other signs observed as the disease progresses are tongue weakness (82%), proximal lower-extremity weakness (71%), wet voice due to pooling of saliva (67%), limitation of upward gaze (61%), facial muscle weakness (43%), and proximal upper extremity weakness (38%). Involvement of the nervous system occurs on occasion. Severe OPMD, representing 5% to 10% of all OPMD, is characterized by onset of ptosis and dysphagia before age 45 years and incapacitating proximal leg weakness that starts before age 60 years. Some individuals with severe involvement eventually need a wheelchair. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75730
Concept ID:
C0270952
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Muscular dystrophy

Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and muscle loss. Some forms of MD appear in infancy or childhood. Others may not appear until middle age or later. The different types can vary in whom they affect, which muscles they affect, and what the symptoms are. All forms of MD grow worse as the person's muscles get weaker. Most people with MD eventually lose the ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent complications. They include physical and speech therapy, orthopedic devices, surgery, and medications. Some people with MD have mild cases that worsen slowly. Others cases are disabling and severe. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44527
Concept ID:
C0026850
Finding; Finding
4.

Peripheral neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is a general term for any disorder of the peripheral nervous system. The main clinical features used to classify peripheral neuropathy are distribution, type (mainly demyelinating versus mainly axonal), duration, and course. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506330
Concept ID:
CN008687
Finding
5.

Myopathy

A disorder of muscle unrelated to impairment of innervation or neuromuscular junction. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505479
Concept ID:
CN002886
Finding
6.

Peripheral neuropathy

Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body. . There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like Guillain-Barre syndrome, happen after a virus infection. Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders. Symptoms often start gradually, and then get worse. They include . - Numbness. - Pain. - Burning or tingling. - Muscle weakness. - Sensitivity to touch. Treatment aims to treat any underlying problem, reduce pain and control symptoms. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18386
Concept ID:
C0031117
Finding
7.

Myopathy

Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. . Causes of muscle disorders include. -Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis . -A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy. -Some cancers. -Inflammation, such as myositis. -Diseases of nerves that affect muscles. -Infections. -Certain medicines. Sometimes the cause is not known.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10135
Concept ID:
C0026848
Finding
8.

Ophthalmoparesis

Ophthalmoplegia is a paralysis or weakness of one or more of the muscles that control eye movement. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
155551
Concept ID:
C0751401
Finding
9.

Opsoclonus

Spontaneous, non-rhythmic, multi-directional, chaotic movements of the eyes, giving the appearance of agitation. There may be bursts of conjugate movement of the eyes in varying directions and of varying amplitude. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
116616
Concept ID:
C0242567
Finding
10.

Paralysis

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia. . Most paralysis is due to strokes or injuries such as spinal cord injury or a broken neck. Other causes of paralysis include. -Nerve diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. - Autoimmune diseases such as Guillain-Barre syndrome. - Bell's palsy, which affects muscles in the face. Polio used to be a cause of paralysis, but polio no longer occurs in the U.S.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
105510
Concept ID:
C0522224
Finding
11.

Ophthalmoplegia

Paralysis of one or more extraocular muscles that are responsible for eye movements. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
45205
Concept ID:
C0029089
Finding
12.

Dysphagia

If you have a swallowing disorder, you may have difficulty or pain when swallowing. Some people cannot swallow at all. Others may have trouble swallowing liquids, foods, or saliva. This makes it hard to eat. Often, it can be difficult to take in enough calories and fluids to nourish your body. Anyone can have a swallowing disorder, but it is more likely in the elderly. It often happens because of other conditions, including. - Nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and cerebral palsy. - Problems with your esophagus, including GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). - Stroke. - Head or spinal cord injury. - Cancer of the head, neck, or esophagus. Medicines can help some people, while others may need surgery. Swallowing treatment with a speech-language pathologist can help. You may find it helpful to change your diet or hold your head or neck in a certain way when you eat. In very serious cases, people may need feeding tubes. NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41440
Concept ID:
C0011168
Finding
13.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Ptosis of eyelid

The upper eyelid margin is positioned 3 mm or more lower than usual and covers the superior portion of the iris (objective); or, the upper lid margin obscures at least part of the pupil (subjective). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2287
Concept ID:
C0005745
Finding
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