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Items: 14

1.

Resistance to activated protein C

Poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C. A plasma is termed 'APC resistant' when the addition of exogenous APC fails to prolong its clotting time in an activated partial thromboplastin time assay. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506684
Concept ID:
CN167901
Finding
2.

Resistance to activated protein C

Poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C. A plasma is termed 'APC resistant' when the addition of exogenous APC fails to prolong its clotting time in an activated partial thromboplastin time assay. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
109068
Concept ID:
C0600433
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Deep Vein Thrombosis

Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or thigh. If the vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem in the lung, called a pulmonary embolism. Sitting still for a long time can make you more likely to get a DVT. Some medicines and disorders that increase your risk for blood clots can also lead to DVTs. Common symptoms are . - Warmth and tenderness over the vein . - Pain or swelling in the part of the body affected . - Skin redness . Treatment includes medicines to ease pain and inflammation, break up clots and keep new clots from forming. Keeping the affected area raised and applying moist heat can also help. If you are taking a long car or plane trip, take a break, walk or stretch your legs and drink plenty of liquids.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
57448
Concept ID:
C0149871
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Thrombosis

The formation or presence of a thrombus (blood clot) inside a blood vessel. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
21160
Concept ID:
C0040053
Pathologic Function
5.

Deep venous thrombosis

Formation of a blot clot in a deep vein. The clot often blocks blood flow, causing swelling and pain. The deep veins of the leg are most often affected. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505301
Concept ID:
CN002386
Finding
6.

Thrombophilia due to activated protein C resistance

Factor V Leiden thrombophilia is characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C (APC) and an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is the most common VTE, with the legs being the most common site. Thrombosis in unusual locations is less common. Evidence suggests that a heterozygous factor V Leiden mutation has at most a modest effect on recurrence risk after initial treatment of a first VTE. Heterozygosity for factor V Leiden is associated with a two- to threefold increase in relative risk for pregnancy loss, and possibly other pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, fetal growth retardation, and placental abruption. The clinical expression of factor V Leiden thrombophilia is influenced by: The number of factor V Leiden alleles (heterozygotes have a slightly increased risk for venous thrombosis; homozygotes have a much greater thrombotic risk); Coexisting genetic thrombophilic disorders, which have a supra-additive effect on overall thrombotic risk; Acquired thrombophilic disorders: antiphospholipid antibodies, hyperhomocysteinemia, high factor VIII levels, malignancy; and Circumstantial risk factors: travel, central venous catheters, pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), organ transplantation, advancing age, and surgery. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
396074
Concept ID:
C1861171
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Familial multiple polyposis syndrome

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder characterized by cancer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. People with the classic type of familial adenomatous polyposis may begin to develop multiple noncancerous (benign) growths (polyps) in the colon as early as their teenage years. Unless the colon is removed, these polyps will become malignant (cancerous). The average age at which an individual develops colon cancer in classic familial adenomatous polyposis is 39 years. Some people have a variant of the disorder, called attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis, in which polyp growth is delayed. The average age of colorectal cancer onset for attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis is 55 years.In people with classic familial adenomatous polyposis, the number of polyps increases with age, and hundreds to thousands of polyps can develop in the colon. Also of particular significance are noncancerous growths called desmoid tumors. These fibrous tumors usually occur in the tissue covering the intestines and may be provoked by surgery to remove the colon. Desmoid tumors tend to recur after they are surgically removed. In both classic familial adenomatous polyposis and its attenuated variant, benign and malignant tumors are sometimes found in other places in the body, including the duodenum (a section of the small intestine), stomach, bones, skin, and other tissues. People who have colon polyps as well as growths outside the colon are sometimes described as having Gardner syndrome.A milder type of familial adenomatous polyposis, called autosomal recessive familial adenomatous polyposis, has also been identified. People with the autosomal recessive type of this disorder have fewer polyps than those with the classic type. Fewer than 100 polyps typically develop, rather than hundreds or thousands. The autosomal recessive type of this disorder is caused by mutations in a different gene than the classic and attenuated types of familial adenomatous polyposis.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
46010
Concept ID:
C0032580
Neoplastic Process
8.

Peripheral Vascular Diseases

condition in which there is a deviation from or interruption of the normal structure or function of the blood vessels outside the heart; diseases of the peripheral as opposed to the cardiac circulation. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
38790
Concept ID:
C0085096
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include. - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Vasculitis

Vasculitis is an inflammation of the blood vessels. It happens when the body's immune system attacks the blood vessel by mistake. It can happen because of an infection, a medicine, or another disease. The cause is often unknown. Vasculitis can affect arteries, veins and capillaries. Arteries are vessels that carry blood from the heart to the body's organs. Veins are the vessels that carry blood back to the heart. Capillaries are tiny blood vessels that connect the small arteries and veins. . When a blood vessel becomes inflamed, it can. - Narrow, making it more difficult for blood to get through . - Close off completely so that blood can't get through . - Stretch and weaken so much that it bulges. The bulge is called an aneurysm. If it bursts, it can cause dangerous bleeding inside the body. Symptoms of vasculitis can vary, but usually include fever, swelling and a general sense of feeling ill. The main goal of treatment is to stop the inflammation. Steroids and other medicines to stop inflammation are often helpful. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
12054
Concept ID:
C0042384
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Thrombophlebitis

Inflammation of a vein associated with venous thrombosis (blood clot formation within the vein). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
11799
Concept ID:
C0040046
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Abnormality of blood and blood-forming tissues

Your blood is living tissue made up of liquid and solids. The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood and prevent your blood from doing its job. They can be acute or chronic. Many blood disorders are inherited. Other causes include other diseases, side effects of medicines, and a lack of certain nutrients in your diet. Types of blood disorders include. -Platelet disorders, excessive clotting, and bleeding problems, which affect how your blood clots. -Anemia, which happens when your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. -Cancers of the blood, such as leukemia and myeloma. -Eosinophilic disorders, which are problems with one type of white blood cell.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5483
Concept ID:
C0018939
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Blood Coagulation Disorders

Disorders involving the elements of blood coagulation, including platelets, coagulation factors and inhibitors, and the fibrinolytic system [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
604
Concept ID:
C0005779
Disease or Syndrome
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