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Items: 12

1.

Nemaline myopathy

Nemaline myopathy (referred to in this entry as NM) is characterized by weakness, hypotonia, and depressed or absent deep tendon reflexes. Muscle weakness is usually most severe in the face, the neck flexors, and the proximal limb muscles. The clinical classification defines six forms of NM, which are classified by onset and severity of motor and respiratory involvement: Severe congenital (neonatal) (16% of all individuals with NM). Amish NM. Intermediate congenital (20%). Typical congenital (46%). Childhood-onset (13%). Adult-onset (late-onset) (4%). Considerable overlap occurs among the forms. There are significant differences in survival between individuals classified as having severe, intermediate, and typical congenital NM. Severe neonatal respiratory disease and the presence of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita are associated with death in the first year of life. Independent ambulation before age 18 months is predictive of survival. Most children with typical congenital NM are eventually able to walk. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
61528
Concept ID:
C0206157
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Nemaline myopathy

MedGen UID:
880235
Concept ID:
CN235631
Finding
3.

Myopathy

A disorder of muscle unrelated to impairment of innervation or neuromuscular junction. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505479
Concept ID:
CN002886
Finding
4.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Myopathy

Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. . Causes of muscle disorders include. -Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis . -A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy. -Some cancers. -Inflammation, such as myositis. -Diseases of nerves that affect muscles. -Infections. -Certain medicines. Sometimes the cause is not known.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10135
Concept ID:
C0026848
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Nemaline bodies

Nemaline rods are abnormal bodies that can occur in skeletal muscle fibers. The rods can be observed on histological analysis of muscle biopsy tissue or upon electron microscopy, where they appear either as extensions of sarcomeric Z-lines, in random array without obvious attachment to Z-lines (often in areas devoid of sarcomeres) or in large clusters localized at the sarcolemma or intermyofibrillar spaces. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
814369
Concept ID:
C3808039
Finding
7.

X-linked recessive inheritance

A mode of inheritance that is observed for recessive traits related to a gene encoded on the X chromosome. In the context of medical genetics, X-linked recessive disorders manifest in males (who have one copy of the X chromosome and are thus hemizygotes), but generally not in female heterozygotes who have one mutant and one normal allele. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
375779
Concept ID:
C1845977
Finding
8.

Incomplete penetrance

A situation in which mutation carriers do not show clinically evident phenotypic abnormalities. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
332247
Concept ID:
C1836598
Finding
9.

Autosomal dominant inheritance

Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Genetic Function; Intellectual Product
10.

Asymptomatic

The finding of no indications of a particular disease or injury. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
65413
Concept ID:
C0231221
Finding
11.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Congenital chromosomal disease

Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
3441
Concept ID:
C0008626
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
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