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Results: 1 to 20 of 27

1.

Mental Depression

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life. Symptoms can include : -Sadness. -Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy. -Change in weight. -Difficulty sleeping or oversleeping. -Energy loss. -Feelings of worthlessness. -Thoughts of death or suicide. Depression is a disorder of the brain. There are a variety of causes, including genetic, environmental, psychological, and biochemical factors. Depression usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30, and is much more common in women. Women can also get postpartum depression after the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants and talk therapy. Most people do best by using both. . NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8325
Concept ID:
C0011570
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
2.

Anxiety disorder

A category of psychiatric disorders which are characterized by anxious feelings or fear often accompanied by physical symptoms associated with anxiety. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
361
Concept ID:
C0003469
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Depression

MedGen UID:
807334
Concept ID:
CN218434
Finding
4.

Anxiety

MedGen UID:
409544
Concept ID:
C1963064
Finding
5.

Anxiety

Human personality is shaped by genetic and environmental factors, and evidence suggests that the genetic component is highly complex, polygenic, and epistatic. Genetic factors are thought to contribute to 40 to 60% of trait variance. Molecular genetics has tried to identify specific genes for quantitative traits, called quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The QTL concept suggests that complex personality traits or dimensions are not attributable to single genes, but to multiple interacting genes (Reif and Lesch, 2003). Fullerton et al. (2003) stated that psychologists were in agreement that the wide variation in human personalities can be explained by a small number of personality factors, including neuroticism (a measure of emotional stability), which manifests at one extreme as anxiety, depression, moodiness, low self-esteem, and diffidence. They cited a number of studies that had described a relationship between high scores on measures of neuroticism and major depressive disorder. They also noted that theoretical studies had suggested that large samples of randomly ascertained sibs could be used to ascertain phenotypically extreme individuals and thereby increase power to detect genetic linkage in complex traits. See also panic disorder (PAND1; 167870), which is a subtype of anxiety disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335849
Concept ID:
C1842981
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Depression

MedGen UID:
137999
Concept ID:
C0344315
Finding
7.

Panic

Sudden extreme anxiety or fear that may cause irrational thoughts or actions. Panic may include rapid heart rate, flushing (a hot, red face), sweating, and trouble breathing. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45300
Concept ID:
C0030318
Finding
8.

Panic disorder

Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder. It causes panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of terror when there is no real danger. You may feel as if you are losing control. You may also have physical symptoms, such as: -Fast heartbeat. -Chest or stomach pain. -Breathing difficulty. -Weakness or dizziness. -Sweating. -Feeling hot or a cold chill. -Tingly or numb hands. Panic attacks can happen anytime, anywhere, and without warning. You may live in fear of another attack and may avoid places where you have had an attack. For some people, fear takes over their lives and they cannot leave their homes. Panic disorder is more common in women than men. It usually starts when people are young adults. Sometimes it starts when a person is under a lot of stress. Most people get better with treatment. Therapy can show you how to recognize and change your thinking patterns before they lead to panic. Medicines can also help. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14588
Concept ID:
C0030319
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
9.

Elderly person

A person 65 through 79 years of age. For a person older than 79 years, AGED, 80 AND OVER is available. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7927
Concept ID:
C0001792
Finding
10.

Agoraphobia

An anxiety disorder characterized by an intense, irrational fear of venturing out into open places or situations in which help (or escape) might not be available should excessive anxiety or panic symptoms develop. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
175
Concept ID:
C0001818
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
11.

Adult

From 19 to 65 years of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
832807
Concept ID:
CN227396
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Recurrent depression

MedGen UID:
526253
Concept ID:
C0221480
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
13.

Illness (finding)

A state of ill health, bodily malfunction, or discomfort. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
526241
Concept ID:
C0221423
Finding
14.

Separation

MedGen UID:
508125
Concept ID:
C0036679
Pathologic Function
15.

Agoraphobia

A type of anxiety disorder characterized by avoidance of public places, especially where crowds gather. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504586
Concept ID:
CN000710
Finding
16.

Panic disorder 1

The DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) defines panic disorder as the spontaneous, unexpected occurrence of panic attacks followed by persistent concern, worry, and anxiety about having additional panic attacks. Panic attacks are defined as a discrete period of intense fear or discomfort in which at least 4 of 13 symptom criteria are met that develop abruptly and reach a peak within 10 minutes. Some of these criteria include cardiac palpitations, sweating, feelings of choking, fear of losing control, and fear of dying. Panic disorder is divided into panic disorder with or without accompanying agoraphobia. However, agoraphobia can also occur without panic disorder, and panic attacks can occur in the absence of panic disorder. Comorbidity with depressive and addictive disorders is frequent. Barlow et al. (1994) and Smoller and Tsuang (1998) noted that because the diagnostic criteria remain purely clinical, the nosology of anxiety disorders, such as panic disorder, is controversial and evolving. Therefore, it is difficult to do genetic studies because of the difficulty in delineating overlapping phenotypes within the broader context of anxiety disorders. For example, there may be overlap of panic with specific phobias, variable expressivity of panic and anxiety or depression, or phenocopies within a family. The terms 'anxiety neurosis' and 'phobic neurosis' were used in the past (before the DSM-III in 1980) to encompass all of these disorders. Smoller and Tsuang (1998) suggested that dimensional personality traits, such as shyness, behavioral inhibition, and neuroticism (see 607834), could be used to define an anxiety phenotype. Schumacher et al. (2011) provided a review of the genetics of panic disorder. They noted that there is high (80%) comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders, including agoraphobia, mood disorders, substance abuse, and other anxiety disorders. Associated personality traits include anxiety sensitivity, behavioral inhibition, neuroticism, and harm avoidance. Women are more susceptible to development of the disorder, which has an average age of onset at 23.6 years. Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Panic Disorder See also PAND2 (607853), which has been mapped to chromosome 9, and PAND3 (609985), which has been mapped to chromosome 4. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
401493
Concept ID:
C1868649
Disease or Syndrome
17.

disease transmission

Transmission of disease from one individual to another. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
66979
Concept ID:
C0242781
Pathologic Function
18.

Separation anxiety

MedGen UID:
1999
Concept ID:
C0003477
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
19.

Anxiety neurosis

Term was discontinued in 1997. In 2000, the term was removed from all records containing it, and replaced with ANXIETY DISORDERS, its postable counterpart. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
226912
Concept ID:
C1279420
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
20.

Diagnosis, Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
138165
Concept ID:
C0376338
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction

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