Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 13

1.

Osteoporosis with pseudoglioma

Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome is a rare condition characterized by severe thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) and eye abnormalities that lead to vision loss. In people with this condition, osteoporosis is usually recognized in early childhood. It is caused by a shortage of minerals, such as calcium, in bones (decreased bone mineral density), which makes the bones brittle and prone to fracture. Affected individuals often have multiple bone fractures, including in the bones that form the spine (vertebrae). Multiple fractures can cause collapse of the affected vertebrae (compressed vertebrae), abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis), short stature, and limb deformities. Decreased bone mineral density can also cause softening or thinning of the skull (craniotabes).Most affected individuals have impaired vision at birth or by early infancy and are blind by young adulthood. Vision problems are usually caused by one of several eye conditions, grouped together as pseudoglioma, that affect the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina), although other eye conditions have been identified in affected individuals. Pseudogliomas are so named because, on examination, the conditions resemble an eye tumor known as a retinal glioma.Rarely, people with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome have additional signs or symptoms such as mild intellectual disability, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), abnormally flexible joints, or seizures.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
98480
Concept ID:
C0432252
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis makes your bones weak and more likely to break. Anyone can develop osteoporosis, but it is common in older women. As many as half of all women and a quarter of men older than 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis. Risk factors include . - Getting older . - Being small and thin . - Having a family history of osteoporosis. - Taking certain medicines. - Being a white or Asian woman. - Having osteopenia, which is low bone density. Osteoporosis is a silent disease. You might not know you have it until you break a bone. A bone mineral density test is the best way to check your bone health. To keep bones strong, eat a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, exercise and do not smoke. If needed, medicines can also help. . NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14535
Concept ID:
C0029456
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Osteoporosis

MedGen UID:
776590
Concept ID:
C2911643
Finding
4.

Bone mineral density quantitative trait locus 8

MedGen UID:
394842
Concept ID:
C2678504
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
5.

Atrophia bulborum hereditaria

NDP-related retinopathies are characterized by a spectrum of fibrous and vascular changes of the retina at birth that progress through childhood or adolescence to cause varying degrees of visual impairment. The most severe phenotype is described as Norrie disease (ND), characterized by greyish yellow fibrovascular masses (pseudogliomas) secondary to retinal vascular dysgenesis and detachment. Congenital blindness is almost always present. Approximately 30%-50% of males with ND have developmental delay/intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, or psychotic-like features. The majority of males with ND develop sensorineural hearing loss. Less severe phenotypes include: persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), characterized by a fibrotic white stalk from the optic disk to the lens; X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (XL-FEVR), characterized by peripheral retinal vascular anomalies with or without fibrotic changes and retinal detachment; retinopathy of prematurity (ROP); and Coats disease, an exudative proliferative vasculopathy. Phenotypes can vary within families. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75615
Concept ID:
C0266526
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
6.

Osteoporosis

Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10498
Concept ID:
C0029458
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Muscle weakness

Reduced strength of muscles. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
57735
Concept ID:
C0151786
Finding; Sign or Symptom
8.

Osteopenia

Osteopenia refers to a reduction in bone mineral density (BMD) below normal peak BMD but not low enough to be classified as osteoporosis. According to the WHO, osteopenia is characterized by a value of BMD more than 1 standard deviation below the young adult mean, but less than 2 standard deviations below this value. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
18222
Concept ID:
C0029453
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
9.

Osteopenia

MedGen UID:
409692
Concept ID:
C1968854
Finding
10.

Blindness

The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
99138
Concept ID:
C0456909
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
11.

Legal blindness

Blindness is the condition of lacking visual perception due to physiological or neurological factors. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
78763
Concept ID:
C0271215
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Hemeralopia

A visual defect characterized by the inability to see as clearly in bright light as in dim light. The word hemeralopia literally means day blindness. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
42391
Concept ID:
C0018975
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Ocular albinism, type II

Aland Island eye disease (AIED) is an X-linked recessive retinal disease characterized by fundus hypopigmentation, decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, astigmatism, protan color vision defect (303900), progressive myopia, and defective dark adaptation. Although AIED has been referred to as a form of albinism, there is no misrouting of the optic nerves, which excludes it from the formal diagnosis of classic albinism (King et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
120643
Concept ID:
C0268505
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...