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1.

Sturge-Weber syndrome

Sturge-Weber syndrome is characterized by an intracranial vascular anomaly, leptomeningeal angiomatosis, most often involving the occipital and posterior parietal lobes. The most common symptoms and signs are facial cutaneous vascular malformations (port-wine stains), seizures, and glaucoma. Stasis results in ischemia underlying the leptomeningeal angiomatosis, leading to calcification and laminar cortical necrosis. The clinical course is highly variable and some children experience intractable seizures, mental retardation, and recurrent stroke-like episodes (review by Thomas-Sohl et al., 2004). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
21361
Concept ID:
C0038505
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Stroke

A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. Mini-strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted. Symptoms of stroke are . -Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of the body). -Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech. -Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes. -Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination. -Sudden severe headache with no known cause. If you have any of these symptoms, you must get to a hospital quickly to begin treatment. Acute stroke therapies try to stop a stroke while it is happening by quickly dissolving the blood clot or by stopping the bleeding. Post-stroke rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment for stroke. . NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
52522
Concept ID:
C0038454
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of eye disorders in which the optic nerves connecting the eyes and the brain are progressively damaged. This damage can lead to reduction in side (peripheral) vision and eventual blindness. Other signs and symptoms may include bulging eyes, excessive tearing, and abnormal sensitivity to light (photophobia). The term "early-onset glaucoma" may be used when the disorder appears before the age of 40.In most people with glaucoma, the damage to the optic nerves is caused by increased pressure within the eyes (intraocular pressure). Intraocular pressure depends on a balance between fluid entering and leaving the eyes.Usually glaucoma develops in older adults, in whom the risk of developing the disorder may be affected by a variety of medical conditions including high blood pressure (hypertension) and diabetes mellitus, as well as family history. The risk of early-onset glaucoma depends mainly on heredity.Structural abnormalities that impede fluid drainage in the eye may be present at birth and usually become apparent during the first year of life. Such abnormalities may be part of a genetic disorder that affects many body systems, called a syndrome. If glaucoma appears before the age of 5 without other associated abnormalities, it is called primary congenital glaucoma.Other individuals experience early onset of primary open-angle glaucoma, the most common adult form of glaucoma. If primary open-angle glaucoma develops during childhood or early adulthood, it is called juvenile open-angle glaucoma.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
42224
Concept ID:
C0017601
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Intellectual functioning disability

Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, has been defined as an IQ score below 70. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7544
Concept ID:
C0025362
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
5.

Seizures

MedGen UID:
851405
Concept ID:
CN232558
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Nevus flammeus

A congenital vascular malformation consisting of superficial and deep dilated capillaries in the skin which produce a reddish to purplish discolouration of the skin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504699
Concept ID:
CN000987
Finding
7.

Glaucoma

MedGen UID:
409541
Concept ID:
C1962986
Finding
8.

Seizures

MedGen UID:
409523
Concept ID:
C1959629
Finding
9.

Stroke

MedGen UID:
340407
Concept ID:
C1849743
Finding
10.

Intellectual disability

MedGen UID:
334384
Concept ID:
C1843367
Finding
11.

Capillary malformations, congenital

Capillary malformations are a form of vascular malformation that are present from birth, tend to grow with the individual, do not regress spontaneously, and show normal rates of endothelial cell turnover. Capillary malformations are distinct from capillary hemangiomas (602089), which are highly proliferative lesions that appear shortly after birth and show rapid growth, slow involution, and endothelial hypercellularity (Spring and Bentz, 2005; Legiehn and Heran, 2006). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
90955
Concept ID:
C0340803
Congenital Abnormality
12.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Glaucoma, congenital

Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), enlargement of the globe (buphthalmos), edema, and opacification of the cornea with rupture of Descemet's membrane (Haabs striae), thinning of the anterior sclera and iris atrophy, anomalously deep anterior chamber, and structurally normal posterior segment except for progressive glaucomatous optic atrophy. Symptoms include photophobia, blepharospasm, and excessive tearing (hyperlacrimation). Typically, the diagnosis is made in the first year of life. Depending on when treatment is instituted, visual acuity may be reduced and/or visual fields may be restricted. In untreated cases, blindness invariably occurs. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
42532
Concept ID:
C0020302
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
14.

Chorangioma

Hamartoma-like growth in the placenta consisting of blood vessels. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
195606
Concept ID:
C0677608
Neoplastic Process
15.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include. - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Abnormality of the skin

An abnormality of the skin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
11449
Concept ID:
C0037268
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
17.

Neoplasm

A general term for autonomous tissue growth in which the malignancy status has not been established and for which the transformed cell type has not been specifically identified. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10294
Concept ID:
C0027651
Neoplastic Process
18.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Intellectual disability and seizures

MedGen UID:
850713
Concept ID:
CN231403
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Autism-facial port-wine stain syndrome

This syndrome is characterised by the presence of a unilateral angioma on the face and autistic developmental problems characterised by language delay and atypical social interactions. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
798742
Concept ID:
CN199278
Disease or Syndrome
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