Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 1 to 20 of 63

1.

Channelopathies

A variety of neuromuscular conditions resulting from MUTATIONS in ION CHANNELS manifesting as episodes of EPILEPSY; HEADACHE DISORDERS; and DYSKINESIAS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
328427
Concept ID:
C1720983
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Nondystrophic myotonia

MedGen UID:
419721
Concept ID:
C2931139
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is a condition in which affected individuals may experience paralytic episodes with concomitant hypokalemia (<2.5 mmol/L), and occasionally may develop late-onset proximal myopathy. The paralytic attacks are characterized by reversible flaccid paralysis usually leading to paraparesis or tetraparesis but typically sparing the respiratory muscles and heart. Acute paralytic crises usually last at least several hours and sometimes days. Some individuals have only one episode in a lifetime; more commonly, crises occur repeatedly: daily, weekly, monthly, or less often. The major triggering factors are carbohydrate-rich meals and rest after exercise; rarely, cold-induced hypokalemic paralysis has been reported. The interval between crises may vary and may be prolonged by preventive treatment with potassium salts or acetazolamide. The age of onset of the first attack ranges from one to 20 years; the frequency of attacks is highest between ages 15 and 35 and then decreases with age. A variable myopathy develops in at least 25% of affected individuals and may result in a progressive fixed muscle weakness that manifests at variable ages as exercise intolerance predominantly in the lower limbs. It may occur independent of paralytic symptoms and may be the sole manifestation of HOKPP. Individuals with HOKPP are at increased risk for pre- or post-anesthetic weakness and may be at an increased risk for malignant hyperthermia – though not as great a risk as in individuals with true autosomal dominant malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
116058
Concept ID:
C0238358
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Paramyotonia congenita

MedGen UID:
113142
Concept ID:
C0221055
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Paralysis

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia. . Most paralysis is due to strokes or injuries such as spinal cord injury or a broken neck. Other causes of paralysis include: -Nerve diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. - Autoimmune diseases such as Guillain-Barre syndrome. - Bell's palsy, which affects muscles in the face. Polio used to be a cause of paralysis, but polio no longer occurs in the U.S.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
105510
Concept ID:
C0522224
Finding
6.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Myotonia

Prolonged failure of muscle relaxation after contraction. This may occur after voluntary contractions, muscle percussion, or electrical stimulation of the muscle. Myotonia is a characteristic feature of MYOTONIC DISORDERS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10238
Concept ID:
C0027125
Finding
8.

Myotonia congenita

Myotonia congenita is characterized by muscle stiffness present from childhood; all striated muscle groups including the extrinsic eye muscles, the facial muscles, and the tongue may be involved. Men are more severely affected than women. Stiffness is relieved by repeated contractions of the muscle (the "warm-up" phenomenon). Muscles are usually hypertrophic. The autosomal recessive form of myotonia congenita is often associated with more severe stiffness of muscles than the autosomal dominant form. Individuals with the autosomal recessive form may have progressive, minor distal weakness and attacks of transient weakness brought on by movement after rest. The age of onset is variable: in autosomal dominant myotonia congenita, onset of symptoms is usually in infancy or early childhood; in the autosomal recessive form, the average age of onset is slightly older. In both, onset may be as late as the third or fourth decade of life. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
10158
Concept ID:
C0027127
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease, such as cancer, from its signs and symptoms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
10.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
11.

disease

MedGen UID:
798428
Concept ID:
CN204926
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Thomsen and Becker disease

MedGen UID:
798097
Concept ID:
CN205376
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Periodic paralysis

MedGen UID:
488958
Concept ID:
C1279412
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis 1

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is a condition in which affected individuals may experience paralytic episodes with concomitant hypokalemia (<2.5 mmol/L), and occasionally may develop late-onset proximal myopathy. The paralytic attacks are characterized by reversible flaccid paralysis usually leading to paraparesis or tetraparesis but typically sparing the respiratory muscles and heart. Acute paralytic crises usually last at least several hours and sometimes days. Some individuals have only one episode in a lifetime; more commonly, crises occur repeatedly: daily, weekly, monthly, or less often. The major triggering factors are carbohydrate-rich meals and rest after exercise; rarely, cold-induced hypokalemic paralysis has been reported. The interval between crises may vary and may be prolonged by preventive treatment with potassium salts or acetazolamide. The age of onset of the first attack ranges from one to 20 years; the frequency of attacks is highest between ages 15 and 35 and then decreases with age. A variable myopathy develops in at least 25% of affected individuals and may result in a progressive fixed muscle weakness that manifests at variable ages as exercise intolerance predominantly in the lower limbs. It may occur independent of paralytic symptoms and may be the sole manifestation of HOKPP. Individuals with HOKPP are at increased risk for pre- or post-anesthetic weakness and may be at an increased risk for malignant hyperthermia – though not as great a risk as in individuals with true autosomal dominant malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
468371
Concept ID:
CN031165
Disease or Syndrome
15.

SUPERNUMERARY DER(22)t(8

Carriers of the balanced constitutional translocation t(8;22)(q24.13;q11.2) are phenotypically normal but are at risk of having progeny with supernumerary der(22)t(8;22) syndrome as a result of malsegregation of the der(22). Although the supernumerary der(22)t(8;22) phenotype is variable between individuals, it tends to include ear and extremity abnormalities in addition to mild mental retardation (summary by Sheridan et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462316
Concept ID:
C3150966
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449707

17.

Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis Type 1

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis type 1 (hyperPP1) is characterized by attacks of flaccid limb weakness (which may also include weakness of the muscles of the eyes, throat, and trunk), hyperkalemia (serum potassium concentration >5 mmol/L) or an increase of serum potassium concentration of at least 1.5 mmol/L during an attack of weakness and/or provoking/worsening of an attack by oral potassium intake, normal serum potassium and muscle strength between attacks, onset before age 20 years, and absence of paramyotonia (muscle stiffness aggravated by cold and exercise). The attacks of flaccid muscle weakness usually begin in the first decade of life. Initially infrequent, the attacks then increase in frequency and severity over time until approximately age 50 years, after which the frequency of attacks declines considerably. Potassium-rich food or rest after exercise may precipitate an attack. A cold environment and emotional stress provoke or worsen the attacks. A spontaneous attack commonly starts in the morning before breakfast, lasts for 15 minutes to one hour, and then disappears. Cardiac arrhythmia or respiratory insufficiency usually does not occur during attacks. Between attacks, hyperPP1 is usually associated with mild myotonia (muscle stiffness) that does not impede voluntary movements. Many older affected individuals develop a chronic progressive myopathy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
442147
Concept ID:
CN074266
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Periodic hyperkalemic paralysis

Episodes of muscle weakness associated with elevated levels of potassium in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
429089
Concept ID:
CN006310
Finding
19.

Congenital myotonia, autosomal dominant form

Myotonia congenita is characterized by muscle stiffness present from childhood; all striated muscle groups including the extrinsic eye muscles, the facial muscles, and the tongue may be involved. Men are more severely affected than women. Stiffness is relieved by repeated contractions of the muscle (the "warm-up" phenomenon). Muscles are usually hypertrophic. The autosomal recessive form of myotonia congenita is often associated with more severe stiffness of muscles than the autosomal dominant form. Individuals with the autosomal recessive form may have progressive, minor distal weakness and attacks of transient weakness brought on by movement after rest. The age of onset is variable: in autosomal dominant myotonia congenita, onset of symptoms is usually in infancy or early childhood; in the autosomal recessive form, the average age of onset is slightly older. In both, onset may be as late as the third or fourth decade of life. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
422446
Concept ID:
C2936781
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Periodic paralysis

MedGen UID:
376420
Concept ID:
C1848694
Finding

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...