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1.

Genetic prion diseases

Genetic prion diseases generally manifest with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. Familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia (FFI) represent the core phenotypes of genetic prion disease. Note: A fourth clinical phenotype, known as Huntington disease like-1 (HDL-1) has been proposed, but this is based on a single report, and the underlying pathologic features would categorize it as GSS. Although it is clear that these four subtypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset ranges from the third to ninth decade of life. The course ranges from a few months to several years (typically 5-7 years; in rare instances, >10 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
56445
Concept ID:
C0162534
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Dementia

Dementia is the name for a group of symptoms caused by disorders that affect the brain. It is not a specific disease. People with dementia may not be able to think well enough to do normal activities, such as getting dressed or eating. They may lose their ability to solve problems or control their emotions. Their personalities may change. They may become agitated or see things that are not there. . Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have dementia. People with dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very elderly people, it is not part of normal aging. Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Drugs are available to treat some of these diseases. While these drugs cannot cure dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve symptoms or slow down the disease. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
99229
Concept ID:
C0497327
Finding; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Huntington chorea

Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive disorder of motor, cognitive, and psychiatric disturbances. The mean age of onset is 35 to 44 years and the median survival time is 15 to 18 years after onset. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5654
Concept ID:
C0020179
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome

Genetic prion diseases generally manifest with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. Familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia (FFI) represent the core phenotypes of genetic prion disease. Note: A fourth clinical phenotype, known as Huntington disease like-1 (HDL-1) has been proposed, but this is based on a single report, and the underlying pathologic features would categorize it as GSS. Although it is clear that these four subtypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset ranges from the third to ninth decade of life. The course ranges from a few months to several years (typically 5-7 years; in rare instances, >10 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
4886
Concept ID:
C0017495
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Alzheimer disease

Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by dementia that typically begins with subtle and poorly recognized failure of memory and slowly becomes more severe and, eventually, incapacitating. Other common findings include confusion, poor judgment, language disturbance, agitation, withdrawal, and hallucinations. Occasionally, seizures, Parkinsonian features, increased muscle tone, myoclonus, incontinence, and mutism occur. Death usually results from general inanition, malnutrition, and pneumonia. The typical clinical duration of the disease is eight to ten years, with a range from one to 25 years. Approximately 25% of all AD is familial (i.e., =2 persons in a family have AD) of which approximately 95% is late onset (age >60-65 years) and 5% is early onset (age <65 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1853
Concept ID:
C0002395
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Alzheimer disease

A degenerative disease of the brain characterized by the insidious onset of dementia. Impairment of memory, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe apraxia and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuropil threads. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505259
Concept ID:
CN002282
Finding
7.

Dementia

A loss of global cognitive ability of sufficient amount to interfere with normal social or occupational function. Dementia represents a loss of previously present cognitive abilities, generally in adults, and can affect memory, thinking, language, judgment, and behavior. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504574
Concept ID:
CN000683
Finding
8.

Primary cortisol resistance

MedGen UID:
443921
Concept ID:
C2930863
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease

Genetic prion diseases generally manifest with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. Familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia (FFI) represent the core phenotypes of genetic prion disease. Note: A fourth clinical phenotype, known as Huntington disease like-1 (HDL-1) has been proposed, but this is based on a single report, and the underlying pathologic features would categorize it as GSS. Although it is clear that these four subtypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset ranges from the third to ninth decade of life. The course ranges from a few months to several years (typically 5-7 years; in rare instances, >10 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
7179
Concept ID:
C0022336
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Tauopathy

Neurodegenerative disorders involving deposition of abnormal tau protein isoforms (TAU PROTEINS) in neurons and glial cells in the brain. Pathological aggregations of tau proteins are associated with mutation of the tau gene on chromosome 17 in patients with ALZHEIMER DISEASE; DEMENTIA; PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS; progressive supranuclear palsy (SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE); and corticobasal degeneration. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181880
Concept ID:
C0949664
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Mental disorder

Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including. -Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias. -Bipolar disorder. -Depression. -Mood disorders. -Personality disorders. -Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play a role. Your life experiences, such as stress or a history of abuse, may also matter. Biological factors can also be part of the cause. A traumatic brain injury can lead to a mental disorder. A mother's exposure to viruses or toxic chemicals while pregnant may play a part. Other factors may increase your risk, such as use of illegal drugs or having a serious medical condition like cancer. Medications and counseling can help many mental disorders. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14047
Concept ID:
C0004936
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
14.

Disorder of the central nervous system

A structural abnormality of the central nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3306
Concept ID:
C0007682
Disease or Syndrome
15.

CNS infection

Pathogenic infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges. DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal infections; PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS; HELMINTHIASIS; and PRION DISEASES may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2948
Concept ID:
C0007684
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Alzheimer disease, type 14

MedGen UID:
369666
Concept ID:
C1970144
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Alzheimer disease 17

MedGen UID:
767366
Concept ID:
C3554452
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Myopathy, areflexia, respiratory distress, and dysphagia, early-onset

This disorder represents a congenital myopathy characterized by proximal and generalized muscle weakness, respiratory difficulties, joint contractures, and scoliosis. More variable features include cleft palate and feeding difficulties. There is variable severity: some patients become ventilator-dependent, never achieve walking, and die in childhood, whereas others have a longer and more favorable course (summary by Logan et al., 2011 and Boyden et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482309
Concept ID:
C3280679
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Alzheimer disease, type 6

Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by subtle onset of memory loss followed by a slowly progressive dementia. The great majority of AD cases are of late onset (LOAD) after age 65 years. LOAD shows complex, nonmendelian patterns of inheritance, and most likely results from the combined effects of variation in a number of genes as well as from environmental factors (summary by Grupe et al., 2006). The Alzheimer disease-6 (AD6) designation refers to a susceptibility locus on chromosome 10q. Although significant associations with several candidate genes on chromosome 10 have been reported, these findings have not been consistently replicated, and they remain controversial (Grupe et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Alzheimer disease, see 104300. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
381362
Concept ID:
C1854187
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Alzheimer disease, type 8

MedGen UID:
375956
Concept ID:
C1846735
Disease or Syndrome
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