Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Results: 4

1.

Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis is a disease that leads to inflammation, usually in your lungs, skin, or lymph nodes. It starts as tiny, grain-like lumps, called granulomas. Sarcoidosis can affect any organ in your body. . No one is sure what causes sarcoidosis. It affects men and women of all ages and races. It occurs mostly in people ages 20 to 50, African Americans, especially women, and people of Northern European origin. Many people have no symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include: -Cough. -Shortness of breath. -Weight loss. -Night sweats. -Fatigue. Tests to diagnose sarcoidosis include chest x-rays, lung function tests, and a biopsy. Not everyone who has the disease needs treatment. If you do, prednisone, a type of steroid, is the main treatment. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
48554
Concept ID:
C0036202
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Tetanus

Tetanus is a serious illness caused by Clostridium bacteria. The bacteria live in soil, saliva, dust, and manure. The bacteria can enter the body through a deep cut, like those you might get from stepping on a nail, or through a burn. The infection causes painful tightening of the muscles, usually all over the body. It can lead to locking of the jaw. This makes it impossible to open your mouth or swallow. Tetanus is a medical emergency. You need to get treatment in a hospital. A vaccine can prevent tetanus. It is given as a part of routine childhood immunization. Adults should get a tetanus shot, or booster, every 10 years. If you get a bad cut or burn, see your doctor - you may need a booster. Immediate and proper wound care can prevent tetanus infection.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
21489
Concept ID:
C0039614
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Sarcoidosis 1

Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder associated with an accumulation of CD4+ T cells and a Th1 immune response. In childhood, 2 distinct types of sarcoidosis have been described (Shetty and Gedalia, 1998). Usually the disease is detected in older children by chest radiography, and the clinical manifestations are characterized by a classic triad of lung, lymph node, and eye involvement, similar to those in adults. In contrast, early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS; 609464), which usually appears in those younger than 4 years of age, is rare and has a distinct triad of skin, joint, and eye disorders, without apparent pulmonary involvement. Compared with an asymptomatic and sometimes naturally disappearing course of the disease in older children, EOS is progressive and in many cases causes severe complications, such as blindness, joint destruction, and visceral involvement. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
426944
Concept ID:
CN034668
Disease or Syndrome
4.

SARCOIDOSIS, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO, 1 (finding)

MedGen UID:
394568
Concept ID:
C2697310
Finding

Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...