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Results: 1 to 20 of 86

1.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Biotin

A nutrient in the vitamin B complex that the body needs in small amounts to function and stay healthy. Biotin helps some enzymes break down substances in the body for energy and helps tissues develop. It is found in yeast, whole milk, egg yolks, and organ meats. Biotin is water-soluble (can dissolve in water) and must be taken in every day. Not enough biotin can cause skin, nerve, and eye disorders. Biotin is present in larger amounts in some cancer tissue than in normal tissue. Attaching biotin to substances used to treat some types of cancer helps them find cancer cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
2646
Concept ID:
C0005575
Pharmacologic Substance
3.

disease

An alteration of health status resulting from a physiopathological mechanism, and having a homogeneous clinical presentation and evolution and homogeneous therapeutic possibilities. Excludes developmental anomalies. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
798428
Concept ID:
CN204926
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Abnormality of the basal ganglia

Abnormality of the basal ganglia. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427912
Concept ID:
CN001934
Finding
5.

Basal ganglia disease, biotin-responsive

Biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease (BTBGD) is characterized by recurrent subacute encephalopathy manifest as confusion, seizures, ataxia, dystonia, supranuclear facial palsy, external ophthalmoplegia, and/or dysphagia which - if left untreated - can eventually lead to coma and even death. Dystonia and cogwheel rigidity are nearly always present; hyperreflexia, ankle clonus, and Babinski responses are common. Hemiparesis or quadriparesis may be seen. Episodes are often triggered by febrile illness or mild trauma or surgery. Less frequently, BTBGD presents as chronic or slowly progressive dystonia, seizures, and/or psychomotor delay. Although onset is usually in childhood (ages three to ten 10 years), it is extremely variable, ranging from the newborn period to adulthood. Prompt administration of biotin and thiamine early in the disease course results in partial or complete improvement within days. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
375289
Concept ID:
C1843807
Disease or Syndrome
6.

proven venom

MedGen UID:
195973
Concept ID:
C0700164
Pharmacologic Substance
7.

sequelae aspects

MedGen UID:
116734
Concept ID:
C0243088
Pathologic Function
8.

Atrophy

Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
83084
Concept ID:
C0333641
Pathologic Function
9.

Thiamine

vitamin B1 [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
21509
Concept ID:
C0039840
Pharmacologic Substance
10.

Seizure

Seizures are symptoms of a brain problem. They happen because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. When people think of seizures, they often think of convulsions in which a person's body shakes rapidly and uncontrollably. Not all seizures cause convulsions. There are many types of seizures and some have mild symptoms. Seizures fall into two main groups. Focal seizures, also called partial seizures, happen in just one part of the brain. Generalized seizures are a result of abnormal activity on both sides of the brain. . Most seizures last from 30 seconds to 2 minutes and do not cause lasting harm. However, it is a medical emergency if seizures last longer than 5 minutes or if a person has many seizures and does not wake up between them. Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries and certain diseases. People who have recurring seizures due to a brain disorder have epilepsy. . NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20693
Concept ID:
C0036572
Sign or Symptom
11.

Diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease, such as cancer, from its signs and symptoms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
12.

Elderly person

A person 65 through 79 years of age. For a person older than 79 years, AGED, 80 AND OVER is available. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7927
Concept ID:
C0001792
Finding
13.

Intellectual functioning disability

A developmental disorder characterized by less than average intelligence and significant limitations in adaptive behavior with onset before the age of 18. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7544
Concept ID:
C0025362
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
14.

Gliosis

The production of a dense fibrous network of neuroglia; includes astrocytosis, which is a proliferation of astrocytes in the area of a degenerative lesion. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
4899
Concept ID:
C0017639
Pathologic Function
15.

Seizure Disorders

Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters of nerve cells, or neurons, in the brain send out the wrong signals. People may have strange sensations and emotions or behave strangely. They may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, and abnormal brain development. In many cases, the cause is unknown. Doctors use brain scans and other tests to diagnose epilepsy. It is important to start treatment right away. There is no cure for epilepsy, but medicines can control seizures for most people. When medicines are not working well, surgery or implanted devices such as vagus nerve stimulators may help. Special diets can help some children with epilepsy. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4506
Concept ID:
C0014544
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Edema

Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles and legs, but it can involve your entire body. Causes of edema include: -Eating too much salt. -Sunburn. -Heart failure. -Kidney disease. -Liver problems from cirrhosis. -Pregnancy. -Problems with lymph nodes, especially after mastectomy. -Some medicines. -Standing or walking a lot when the weather is warm. To keep swelling down, your health care provider may recommend keeping your legs raised when sitting, wearing support stockings, limiting how much salt you eat, or taking a medicine called a diuretic - also called a water pill. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4451
Concept ID:
C0013604
Pathologic Function
17.

Dystonia

Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive movements and/or postures. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be associated with tremor. Dystonia is often initiated or worsened by voluntary action and associated with overflow muscle activation. Dystonia can be classified clinically according to age of onset, body distribution, temporal pattern, and associated features (i.e., isolated dystonia – in which it is the only motor feature except tremor; combined dystonia – in which another movement disorder is present; or complex dystonia – in which other neurologic or systemic manifestations are present). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
3940
Concept ID:
C0013421
Sign or Symptom
18.

Chronic disease

Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
3453
Concept ID:
C0008679
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Coma

A coma is a deep state of unconsciousness. An individual in a coma is alive but unable to move or respond to his or her environment. Coma may occur as a complication of an underlying illness, or as a result of injuries, such as brain injury. A coma rarely lasts more than 2 to 4 weeks. The outcome for coma depends on the cause, severity, and site of the damage. People may come out of a coma with physical, intellectual, and psychological problems. Some people may remain in a coma for years or even decades. For those people, the most common cause of death is infection, such as pneumonia. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1054
Concept ID:
C0009421
Disease or Syndrome
20.

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807319

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