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Results: 1 to 20 of 106

1.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of disorders that affect connective tissues, which are tissues that support the skin, bones, blood vessels, and other organs. Defects in connective tissues cause the signs and symptoms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, which vary from mildly loose joints to life-threatening complications. In the past, there were more than 10 recognized types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. In 1997, researchers proposed a simpler classification that reduced the number of major types to six and gave them descriptive names: the arthrochalasia type, the classic type, the dermatosparaxis type, the hypermobility type, the kyphoscoliosis type, and the vascular type. Other forms of the condition may exist, but they have been reported only in single families or are not well characterized. Although all types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome affect the joints and many also affect the skin, features vary by type. An unusually large range of joint movement (hypermobility) occurs with most forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, particularly the hypermobility type. Infants with hypermobile joints often appear to have weak muscle tone, which can delay the development of motor skills such as sitting, standing, and walking. The loose joints are unstable and prone to dislocation, chronic pain, and early-onset arthritis. Dislocations involving both hips are a characteristic finding in infants with the arthrochalasia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Many people with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have soft, velvety skin that is highly elastic (stretchy) and fragile. Affected individuals tend to bruise easily, and some types of the condition also cause abnormal scarring. People with the classic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experience wounds that split open with little bleeding and leave scars that widen over time to create characteristic shallow "cigarette paper" scars. The dermatosparaxis type of the disorder is characterized by skin that sags and wrinkles. Extra (redundant) folds of skin may be present as affected children get older. Some forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, notably the vascular and kyphoscoliosis types, can involve serious and potentially life-threatening complications. Blood vessels can tear (rupture) unpredictably, causing internal bleeding, stroke, and shock. The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is also associated with an increased risk of organ rupture, including tearing of the intestine and rupture of the uterus (womb) during pregnancy. People with the kyphoscoliosis form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experience severe, progressive curvature of the spine that can interfere with breathing.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
41720
Concept ID:
C0013720
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
430751

4.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type 4

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS type IV) is characterized by thin, translucent skin; easy bruising; characteristic facial appearance (in some individuals); and arterial, intestinal, and/or uterine fragility. Vascular dissection or rupture, gastrointestinal perforation, or organ rupture are the presenting signs in the majority of adults identified to have EDS type IV. Arterial rupture may be preceded by aneurysm, arteriovenous fistulae, or dissection but also may occur spontaneously. Neonates may present with clubfoot and/or congenital dislocation of the hips. In childhood, inguinal hernia, pneumothorax, and recurrent joint subluxation or dislocation can occur. Pregnancy for women with EDS type IV has as much as a 12% risk for death from peripartum arterial rupture or uterine rupture. One-fourth of individuals with EDS type IV who have undergone laboratory testing to confirm their diagnosis have experienced a significant medical problem by age 20 years and more than 80% by age 40 years. The median age of death in this reviewed population was 48 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82790
Concept ID:
C0268338
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Pain

Pain is a feeling triggered in the nervous system. Pain may be sharp or dull. It may come and go, or it may be constant. You may feel pain in one area of your body, such as your back, abdomen or chest or you may feel pain all over, such as when your muscles ache from the flu. Pain can be helpful in diagnosing a problem. Without pain, you might seriously hurt yourself without knowing it, or you might not realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain usually goes away. However, sometimes pain goes on for weeks, months or even years. This is called chronic pain. Sometimes chronic pain is due to an ongoing cause, such as cancer or arthritis. Sometimes the cause is unknown. Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain relievers, acupuncture and sometimes surgery are helpful.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
45282
Concept ID:
C0030193
Sign or Symptom
7.

Varicose veins

Varicose veins are swollen, twisted veins that you can see just under the skin. They usually occur in the legs, but also can form in other parts of the body. Hemorrhoids are a type of varicose vein. Your veins have one-way valves that help keep blood flowing toward your heart. If the valves are weak or damaged, blood can back up and pool in your veins. This causes the veins to swell, which can lead to varicose veins. Varicose veins are very common. You are more at risk if you are older, a female, obese, don't exercise or have a family history. They can also be more common in pregnancy. Doctors often diagnose varicose veins from a physical exam. Sometimes you may need additional tests. Exercising, losing weight, elevating your legs when resting, and not crossing them when sitting can help keep varicose veins from getting worse. Wearing loose clothing and avoiding long periods of standing can also help. If varicose veins are painful or you don't like the way they look, your doctor may recommend procedures to remove them. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
21827
Concept ID:
C0042345
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Female

A person who belongs to the sex that normally produces ova. The term is used to indicate biological sex distinctions, or cultural gender role distinctions, or both. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8807
Concept ID:
C0015780
Finding
9.

Dizziness

Sensation of motion involving either oneself or one's environment; sensation of rotating, swaying or tilting. [from ICF]

MedGen UID:
4360
Concept ID:
C0012833
Sign or Symptom
10.

Pain

MedGen UID:
776584
Concept ID:
C2364139
Finding
11.

Hypoplasia

Incomplete or arrested development of an organ or a part [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
537146
Concept ID:
C0243069
Pathologic Function
12.

Resonance

MedGen UID:
534094
Concept ID:
C0231881
Finding
13.

Varicose veins

Enlarged and tortuous veins. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505297
Concept ID:
CN002380
Finding
14.

Dysautonomia

`Dysfunction` (PATO:0001641) of the `autonomic nervous system` (FMA:9905). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505243
Concept ID:
CN002233
Finding
15.

Joint hypermobility

The ability of a joint to move beyond its normal range of motion. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504821
Concept ID:
CN001265
Finding
16.

Vertigo

An abnormal sensation of spinning while the body is actually stationary. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
500924
Concept ID:
CN002108
Finding
17.

Mild

The second level of severity in an ordered list based on a five-level scale of minimal, mild, moderate, marked, and severe. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
422477
Concept ID:
C2945599
18.

Arthralgia

MedGen UID:
409545
Concept ID:
C1963066
Finding
19.

Dermal translucency

MedGen UID:
373141
Concept ID:
C1836646
Finding
20.

Functional disorder

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
Pathologic Function

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