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Results: 1 to 20 of 86

1.

Colorectal Cancer

Cancer of the colon or rectum is also called colorectal cancer. In the United States, it is the fourth most common cancer in men and women. Caught early, it is often curable. . It is more common in people over 50, and the risk increases with age. You are also more likely to get it if you have: -Polyps - growths inside the colon and rectum that may become cancerous. -A diet that is high in fat. -A family history or personal history of colorectal cancer. -Ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. Symptoms can include blood in the stool, narrower stools, a change in bowel habits and general stomach discomfort. However, you may not have symptoms at first, so screening is important. Everyone who is 50 or older should be screened for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy is one method that your doctor can use to screen for colorectal cancer. Treatments for colorectal cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation or a combination. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
287122
Concept ID:
C1527249
Neoplastic Process
2.

Muir-Torré syndrome

Lynch syndrome, caused by a germline mutation (i.e. pathogenic variant in the germline) in a mismatch repair gene and associated with tumors exhibiting microsatellite instability (MSI), is characterized by an increased risk for colon cancer and cancers of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, small intestine, hepatobiliary tract, urinary tract, brain, and skin. In individuals with Lynch syndrome the following life time risks for cancer are seen: 52%-82% for colorectal cancer (mean age at diagnosis 44-61 years); 25%-60% for endometrial cancer in women (mean age at diagnosis 48-62 years); 6% to 13% for gastric cancer (mean age at diagnosis 56 years); and 4%-12% for ovarian cancer (mean age at diagnosis 42.5 years; approximately 30% are diagnosed before age 40 years). The risk for other Lynch syndrome-related cancers is lower, though substantially increased over general population rates. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
231157
Concept ID:
C1321489
Neoplastic Process
3.

Malignant neoplastic disease

A general term for autonomous tissue growth exhibiting morphologic features of malignancy (e.g. severe atypia, nuclear pleomorphism, tumor cell necrosis, abnormal mitoses, tissue invasiveness) and for which the transformed cell type has not been specifically identified. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
4.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Adenoma

A tumor that is not cancer. It starts in gland-like cells of the epithelial tissue (thin layer of tissue that covers organs, glands, and other structures within the body). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
125
Concept ID:
C0001430
Neoplastic Process
6.

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ID:
449833

7.

Familial colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that is common in both men and women. In addition to lifestyle and environmental risk factors, gene defects can contribute to an inherited predisposition to CRC. CRC is caused by changes in different molecular pathogenic pathways, such as chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Chromosome instability is the most common alteration and is present in almost 85% of all cases (review by Schweiger et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Colorectal Cancer Mutations in a single gene result in a marked predisposition to colorectal cancer in 2 distinct syndromes: familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 175100) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; see 120435). FAP is caused by mutations in the APC gene (611731), whereas HNPCC is caused by mutations in several genes, including MSH2 (609309), MLH1 (120436), PMS1 (600258), PMS2 (600259), MSH6 (600678), TGFBR2 (190182), and MLH3 (604395). Epigenetic silencing of MSH2 results in a form of HNPCC (see HNPCC8, 613244). Other colorectal cancer syndromes include autosomal recessive adenomatous polyposis (608456), which is caused by mutations in the MUTYH gene (604933), and oligodontia-colorectal cancer syndrome (608615), which is caused by mutations in the AXIN2 gene (604025). The CHEK2 gene (604373) has been implicated in susceptibility to colorectal cancer in Finnish patients. A germline mutation in the PLA2G2A gene (172411) was identified in a patient with colorectal cancer. Germline susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer have also been identified. CRCS1 (608812) is conferred by mutation in the GALNT12 gene (610290) on chromosome 9q22; CRCS2 (611469) maps to chromosome 8q24; CRCS3 (612229) is conferred by variation in the SMAD7 gene (602932) on chromosome 18; CRCS4 (601228) is conferred by variation on 15q that causes increased and ectopic expression of the GREM1 gene (603054); CRCS5 (612230) maps to chromosome 10p14; CRCS6 (612231) maps to chromosome 8q23; CRCS7 (612232) maps to chromosome 11q23; CRCS8 (612589) maps to chromosome 14q22; CRCS9 (612590) maps to 16q22; CRCS10 (612591) is conferred by mutation in the POLD1 gene (174761) on chromosome 19q13; CRCS11 (612592) maps to chromosome 20p12; and CRCS12 (615083) is conferred by mutation in the POLE gene (174762) on chromosome 12q24. Somatic mutations in many different genes, including KRAS (190070), PIK3CA (171834), BRAF (164757), CTNNB1 (116806), FGFR3 (134934), AXIN2 (604025), AKT1 (164730), MCC (159350), MYH11 (160745), and PARK2 (602544) have been identified in colorectal cancer. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
430218
Concept ID:
CN029768
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Adenoma sebaceum

The presence of a `sebaceous adenoma` (MPATH:230) with origin in the `sebum secreting cells` (CL:000031) of the `skin` (FMA:7163). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
429434
Concept ID:
CN008580
Finding
9.

Sebaceous adenoma

A benign, well circumscribed neoplasm arising from the sebaceous glands. It usually presents as a small yellowish tumor in the sun exposed skin of head and neck. It is characterized by the presence of sebaceous cells aggregates with a peripheral rim of basaloid cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
237152
Concept ID:
C1368816
Neoplastic Process
10.

Carcinoma of colon

Cancer that forms in the tissues of the colon (the longest part of the large intestine). Most colon cancers are adenocarcinomas (cancers that begin in cells that make and release mucus and other fluids). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
147065
Concept ID:
C0699790
Neoplastic Process
11.

Colorectal Carcinoma

Cancer that develops in the colon (the longest part of the large intestine) and/or the rectum (the last several inches of the large intestine before the anus). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3170
Concept ID:
C0009402
Neoplastic Process
12.

Lynch syndrome

Autosomal dominant disease caused by a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene and manifest by hereditary malignancy. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
232602
Concept ID:
C1333990
Neoplastic Process
13.

Neoplasm

A general term for autonomous tissue growth in which the malignancy status has not been established and for which the transformed cell type has not been specifically identified. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10294
Concept ID:
C0027651
Neoplastic Process
14.

Diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease, such as cancer, from its signs and symptoms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
15.

Male gender

A person who belongs to the sex that normally produces sperm. The term is used to indicate biological sex distinctions, cultural gender role distinctions, or both. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7446
Concept ID:
C0024554
Finding
16.

Rare genetic skin disease

MedGen UID:
797897
Concept ID:
CN205527
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Absence

MedGen UID:
739164
Concept ID:
C1689985
Anatomical Abnormality
18.

History of previous events

The aggregate of past events; the continuum of events occurring in succession leading from the past to the present; a record or narrative description of past events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389153
Concept ID:
C2004062
Finding
19.

Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome

Males with deafness-dystonia-optic neuronopathy (DDON) syndrome have prelingual or postlingual sensorineural hearing impairment in early childhood, slowly progressive dystonia or ataxia in the teens, slowly progressive decreased visual acuity from optic atrophy beginning approximately age 20 years, and dementia beginning at approximately age 40 years. Psychiatric symptoms such as personality change and paranoia may appear in childhood and progress. The hearing impairment appears to be consistent in age of onset and progression, whereas the neurologic, visual, and neuropsychiatric signs vary in degree of severity and rate of progression. Females may have mild hearing impairment and focal dystonia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
162903
Concept ID:
C0796074
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Genodermatosis

Diseases of the skin with a genetic component, usually the result of various inborn errors of metabolism. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
20779
Concept ID:
C0037277
Disease or Syndrome

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