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Results: 1 to 20 of 67

1.

Hypouricemia

An abnormally low level of uric acid in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505553
Concept ID:
CN003192
Finding
2.

Hypouricemia

MedGen UID:
113163
Concept ID:
C0221333
Pathologic Function
3.

Hyperuricemia

Excessive URIC ACID or urate in blood as defined by its solubility in plasma at 37 degrees C; greater than 0.42mmol per liter (7.0mg/dL) in men or 0.36mmol per liter (6.0mg/dL) in women. This condition is caused by overproduction of uric acid or impaired renal clearance. Hyperuricemia can be acquired, drug-induced or genetically determined (LESCH-NYHAN SYNDROME). It is associated with HYPERTENSION and GOUT. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
149260
Concept ID:
C0740394
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Nephrolithiasis

Formation of stones in the KIDNEY. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
98227
Concept ID:
C0392525
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Gout

Gout is a common, painful form of arthritis. It causes swollen, red, hot and stiff joints. Gout happens when uric acid builds up in your body. Uric acid comes from the breakdown of substances called purines. Purines are in your body's tissues and in foods, such as liver, dried beans and peas, and anchovies. Normally, uric acid dissolves in the blood. It passes through the kidneys and out of the body in urine. But sometimes uric acid can build up and form needle-like crystals. When they form in your joints, it is very painful. The crystals can also cause kidney stones. Often, gout first attacks your big toe. It can also attack ankles, heels, knees, wrists, fingers, and elbows. At first, gout attacks usually get better in days. Eventually, attacks last longer and happen more often. You are more likely to get gout if you: -Are a man. -Have family member with gout. -Are overweight. -Drink alcohol. -Eat too many foods rich in purines. Gout can be hard to diagnose. Your doctor may take a sample of fluid from an inflamed joint to look for crystals. You can treat gout with medicines. Pseudogout has similar symptoms and is sometimes confused with gout. However, it is caused by calcium phosphate, not uric acid. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
42280
Concept ID:
C0018099
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease, such as cancer, from its signs and symptoms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
7.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
8.

disease

An alteration of health status resulting from a physiopathological mechanism, and having a homogeneous clinical presentation and evolution and homogeneous therapeutic possibilities. Excludes developmental anomalies. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
798428
Concept ID:
CN204926
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Chronic kidney disease

Functional anomaly of the kidney persisting for at least three months. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
776439
Concept ID:
CN183891
Finding
10.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
760115

11.

Lack of awareness

MedGen UID:
670536
Concept ID:
C0589402
Finding
12.

Hyperuricemia

An abnormally high level of uric acid in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505126
Concept ID:
CN001947
Finding
13.

Gout

Recurrent attacks of acute inflammatory arthritis of a joint or set of joints caused by elevated levels of uric acid in the blood which crystallize and are deposited in joints, tendons, and surrounding tissues. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505046
Concept ID:
CN001808
Finding
14.

Acute kidney injury

Sudden loss of renal function, as manifested by decreased urine production, and a rise in serum creatinine or blood urea nitrogen concentration (azotemia). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505006
Concept ID:
CN001736
Finding
15.

Nephrolithiasis

The presence of calculi (stones) in the kidneys. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504597
Concept ID:
CN000736
Finding
16.

Chronic Kidney Diseases

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of your blood to make urine. They also keep the body's chemical balance, help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged and can't filter blood as they should. This damage can cause wastes to build up in your body. It can also cause other problems that can harm your health. Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most common causes of CKD. Treatment may include medicines to lower blood pressure, control blood glucose, and lower blood cholesterol. CKD can get worse over time. CKD may lead to kidney failure. The only treatment options for kidney failure are dialysis or a kidney transplantation. You can take steps to keep your kidneys healthier longer:: -Choose foods with less salt (sodium). -Keep your blood pressure below 130/80. -Keep your blood glucose in the target range, if you have diabetes. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
473458
Concept ID:
C1561643
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Decreased renal function

MedGen UID:
452273
Concept ID:
C0232807
Finding
18.

Abnormality of the kidney

An abnormality of the kidney. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427390
Concept ID:
CN000077
Finding
19.

History of previous events

The aggregate of past events; the continuum of events occurring in succession leading from the past to the present; a record or narrative description of past events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389153
Concept ID:
C2004062
Finding
20.

Renal impairment

Conditions in which the KIDNEYS perform below the normal level in the ability to remove wastes, concentrate URINE, and maintain ELECTROLYTE BALANCE; BLOOD PRESSURE; and CALCIUM metabolism. Renal insufficiency can be classified by the degree of kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
332529
Concept ID:
C1565489
Disease or Syndrome

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