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Results: 18

1.

Fragile X syndrome

FMR1-related disorders include fragile X syndrome, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), and FMR1-related primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). Fragile X syndrome occurs in individuals with an FMR1 full mutation or other loss-of-function mutation and is nearly always characterized by moderate intellectual disability in affected males and mild intellectual disability in affected females. Because FMR1 mutations are complex alterations involving non-classic gene-disrupting alterations (trinucleotide repeat expansion) and abnormal gene methylation, affected individuals occasionally have an atypical presentation with an IQ above 70, the traditional demarcation denoting intellectual disability (previously referred to as mental retardation). Males with an FMR1 full mutation accompanied by aberrant methylation may have a characteristic appearance (large head, long face, prominent forehead and chin, protruding ears), connective tissue findings (joint laxity), and large testes after puberty. Behavioral abnormalities, sometimes including autism spectrum disorder, are common. FXTAS occurs in males (and some females) who have an FMR1 premutation and is characterized by late-onset, progressive cerebellar ataxia and intention tremor. FMR1-related POI (age at cessation of menses <40 years) occurs in approximately 20% of females who have an FMR1 premutation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
8912
Concept ID:
C0016667
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Multiple fibrofolliculomas

The clinical characteristics of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) include cutaneous manifestations (fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas/angiofibromas, perifollicular fibromas, and acrochordons), pulmonary cysts/history of pneumothorax, and various types of renal tumors. Disease severity can vary significantly even within the same family. Skin lesions typically appear during the third and fourth decades of life and typically increase in size and number with age. Lung cysts are mostly bilateral and multifocal; most individuals are asymptomatic but at high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax. Individuals with BHDS are at a sevenfold increased risk for renal tumors that are typically bilateral and multifocal and usually slow growing; median age of tumor diagnosis is 48 years. The most common renal tumors are a hybrid of oncocytoma and chromophobe histologic cell types (so-called oncocytic hybrid tumor) and chromophobe histologic cell types. Some families have renal tumor and/or autosomal dominant spontaneous pneumothorax without cutaneous manifestations. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
91070
Concept ID:
C0346010
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Intellectual functioning disability

A developmental disorder characterized by less than average intelligence and significant limitations in adaptive behavior with onset before the age of 18. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7544
Concept ID:
C0025362
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
4.

autism

MedGen UID:
833591
Concept ID:
CN229531
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Autism

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted and repetitive behavior. Autism begins in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual (DSM-IV). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504569
Concept ID:
CN000674
Finding
6.

Thyroid hormone plasma membrane transport defect

MedGen UID:
396060
Concept ID:
C1861101
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Intellectual disability

MedGen UID:
334384
Concept ID:
C1843367
Finding
9.

Depression

MedGen UID:
137999
Concept ID:
C0344315
Finding
10.

Autistic disorder of childhood onset

Autism comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders – collectively referred to as “autism spectrum disorders” (ASD) – that share common features of impaired social relationships, impaired language and communication, and repetitive behaviors or a narrow range of interests. For most children with autism, symptoms develop gradually, although approximately 30% have a "regressive" onset usually between ages 18 and 24 months. About 50%-70% of children with autism are identified as intellectually disabled by nonverbal IQ testing and approximately 25% develop seizures. Autism can be considered complex (i.e., presence of dysmorphic features and/or microcephaly) or essential (i.e., absence of physical abnormalities and microcephaly). About 25% of children who fit the diagnostic criteria for ASD at age two to three years subsequently begin to talk and communicate, and by age six to seven years blend to varying degrees into the regular school population. The remaining 75% have lifelong disability requiring intensive parental, school, and social support. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
13966
Concept ID:
C0004352
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
11.

Sex-linked hereditary disorder

Disorders occurring in either sex and which are transmitted by genes in the sex chromosomes. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
183658
Concept ID:
C0949683
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Intellectual disability, profound

IQ below 20. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
43816
Concept ID:
C0020796
Finding
14.

Congenital chromosomal disease

Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
3441
Concept ID:
C0008626
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Autism, susceptibility to, X-linked 2

Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autism, see 209850. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
336964
Concept ID:
C1845539
Finding
16.

FRAXE

FRAXE mental retardation is a form of mild to moderate mental retardation associated with learning difficulties, communication deficits, attention problems, hyperactivity, and autistic behavior (summary by Bensaid et al., 2009). FRAXE is associated with a fragile site on chromosome Xq28 and is the cause of nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation in 1 of 50,000 newborn males. The disorder can be caused either by silencing of the FMR2 gene as a consequence of a CCG expansion located upstream of this gene or by deletion within the gene (Stettner et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
155512
Concept ID:
C0751157
Congenital Abnormality
17.

Mental retardation, X-linked 2

Nonsyndromic mental retardation with a large head, relatively short stature, highly arched palate, square facies, short hands and feet, and macroorchidism. [from MCA/MR]

MedGen UID:
162922
Concept ID:
C0796207
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Autism 5

Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autism, see 209850. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
340048
Concept ID:
C1853755
Disease or Syndrome

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