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1.

Fanconi anemia, complementation group E

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in 60%-75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature; abnormal skin pigmentation; malformations of the thumbs, forearms, skeletal system, eyes, kidneys and urinary tract, ears (and decreased hearing), heart, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system; hypogonadism; and developmental delay. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. By age 40 to 50 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of bone marrow failure is 90%; the incidence of hematologic malignancies (primarily acute myeloid leukemia) 10%-30%; and of nonhematologic malignancies (solid tumors, particularly of the head and neck, skin, GI tract, and genital tract) 25%-30%. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
463628
Concept ID:
C3160739
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Autoimmune disease

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body. No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling. The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2135
Concept ID:
C0004364
Disease or Syndrome

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