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Results: 7

1.

Complication Aspects

Used with diseases to indicate conditions that co-exist or follow, i.e., co-existing diseases, complications, or sequelae. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
223946
Concept ID:
C1171258
Pathologic Function
2.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Branchial cleft, cyst or fistula; preauricular sinus

MedGen UID:
510595
Concept ID:
C0158595
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449670

5.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
6.

Morbid obesity

The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18128
Concept ID:
C0028756
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Fistula of intestine

An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5862
Concept ID:
C0021833
Anatomical Abnormality

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