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Results: 1 to 20 of 74

1.

Caffeine

Caffeine is a bitter substance found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, kola nuts, and certain medicines. It has many effects on the body's metabolism, including stimulating the central nervous system. This can make you more alert and give you a boost of energy. . For most people, the amount of caffeine in two to four cups of coffee a day is not harmful. However, too much caffeine can make you restless, anxious, and irritable. It may also keep you from sleeping well and cause headaches, abnormal heart rhythms, or other problems. If you stop using caffeine, you could get withdrawal symptoms. . Some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than others. They should limit their use of caffeine. So should pregnant and nursing women. Certain drugs and supplements may interact with caffeine. If you have questions about whether caffeine is safe for you, talk with your health care provider.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2403
Concept ID:
C0006644
Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Withdrawal (dysfunction)

A social or emotional detachment, pathological retreat from objective reality, interpersonal contact and social involvement, as in some forms of schizophrenia, depression, or schizoid, avoidant, or schizotypal personality disorders. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
442895
Concept ID:
C2825032
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Behavioral abnormality

An abnormality of mental functioning including various affective, behavioural, cognitive and perceptual abnormalities. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
425007
Concept ID:
CN000665
Finding
4.

Bulimia nervosa

An eating disorder that is characterized by a cycle of binge eating (BULIMIA or bingeing) followed by inappropriate acts (purging) to avert weight gain. Purging methods often include self-induced VOMITING, use of LAXATIVES or DIURETICS, excessive exercise, and FASTING. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
389218
Concept ID:
C2267227
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
5.

Panic

Sudden extreme anxiety or fear that may cause irrational thoughts or actions. Panic may include rapid heart rate, flushing (a hot, red face), sweating, and trouble breathing. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45300
Concept ID:
C0030318
Finding
6.

Panic disorder

Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder. It causes panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of terror when there is no real danger. You may feel as if you are losing control. You may also have physical symptoms, such as: -Fast heartbeat. -Chest or stomach pain. -Breathing difficulty. -Weakness or dizziness. -Sweating. -Feeling hot or a cold chill. -Tingly or numb hands. Panic attacks can happen anytime, anywhere, and without warning. You may live in fear of another attack and may avoid places where you have had an attack. For some people, fear takes over their lives and they cannot leave their homes. Panic disorder is more common in women than men. It usually starts when people are young adults. Sometimes it starts when a person is under a lot of stress. Most people get better with treatment. Therapy can show you how to recognize and change your thinking patterns before they lead to panic. Medicines can also help. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14588
Concept ID:
C0030319
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Substance Use Disorders

MedGen UID:
11630
Concept ID:
C0038586
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
8.

Diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease, such as cancer, from its signs and symptoms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
9.

Depressive disorder

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life. Symptoms can include : -Sadness. -Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy. -Change in weight. -Difficulty sleeping or oversleeping. -Energy loss. -Feelings of worthlessness. -Thoughts of death or suicide. Depression is a disorder of the brain. There are a variety of causes, including genetic, environmental, psychological, and biochemical factors. Depression usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30, and is much more common in women. Women can also get postpartum depression after the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants and talk therapy. Most people do best by using both. . NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4229
Concept ID:
C0011581
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
10.

Bulimia

Disorder characterized primarily by binge eating and often accompanied by self-induced vomiting and/or misuse of laxatives. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
684
Concept ID:
C0006370
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
11.

Anorexia nervosa

A disorder most often seen in adolescent females characterized by a refusal to maintain a minimally normal body weight, an intense fear of gaining weight, a disturbance in body image, and, in postmenarcheal females, the development of amenorrhea. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
316
Concept ID:
C0003125
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
12.

Anorexia

A disorder characterized by a loss of appetite. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
315
Concept ID:
C0003123
Sign or Symptom
13.

Anorexia

MedGen UID:
743955
Concept ID:
C1971624
Finding
14.

Caffeine dependence

MedGen UID:
730520
Concept ID:
C1386553
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
15.

Caffeine withdrawal

MedGen UID:
636735
Concept ID:
C0521652
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
16.

Bulimia

A form of anomalous eating behavior characterized by binge eating is followed by self-induced vomiting or other compensatory behavior intended to prevent weight gain (purging, fasting or exercising or a combination of these). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506530
Concept ID:
CN117630
Finding
17.

Generalized anxiety disorder

An anxiety disorder characterized by excessive and difficult-to-control worry about a number of life situations. The worry is accompanied by restlessness, fatigue, inability to concentrate, irritability, muscle tension, and/or sleep disturbance and lasts for at least 6 months. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
452363
Concept ID:
C0270549
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
18.

Anxiety

MedGen UID:
409544
Concept ID:
C1963064
Finding
19.

Panic disorder 1

The DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) defines panic disorder as the spontaneous, unexpected occurrence of panic attacks followed by persistent concern, worry, and anxiety about having additional panic attacks. Panic attacks are defined as a discrete period of intense fear or discomfort in which at least 4 of 13 symptom criteria are met that develop abruptly and reach a peak within 10 minutes. Some of these criteria include cardiac palpitations, sweating, feelings of choking, fear of losing control, and fear of dying. Panic disorder is divided into panic disorder with or without accompanying agoraphobia. However, agoraphobia can also occur without panic disorder, and panic attacks can occur in the absence of panic disorder. Comorbidity with depressive and addictive disorders is frequent. Barlow et al. (1994) and Smoller and Tsuang (1998) noted that because the diagnostic criteria remain purely clinical, the nosology of anxiety disorders, such as panic disorder, is controversial and evolving. Therefore, it is difficult to do genetic studies because of the difficulty in delineating overlapping phenotypes within the broader context of anxiety disorders. For example, there may be overlap of panic with specific phobias, variable expressivity of panic and anxiety or depression, or phenocopies within a family. The terms 'anxiety neurosis' and 'phobic neurosis' were used in the past (before the DSM-III in 1980) to encompass all of these disorders. Smoller and Tsuang (1998) suggested that dimensional personality traits, such as shyness, behavioral inhibition, and neuroticism (see 607834), could be used to define an anxiety phenotype. Schumacher et al. (2011) provided a review of the genetics of panic disorder. They noted that there is high (80%) comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders, including agoraphobia, mood disorders, substance abuse, and other anxiety disorders. Associated personality traits include anxiety sensitivity, behavioral inhibition, neuroticism, and harm avoidance. Women are more susceptible to development of the disorder, which has an average age of onset at 23.6 years. Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Panic Disorder See also PAND2 (607853), which has been mapped to chromosome 9, and PAND3 (609985), which has been mapped to chromosome 4. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
401493
Concept ID:
C1868649
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Mal de debarquement syndrome

MedGen UID:
345629
Concept ID:
C1608983
Disease or Syndrome

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