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Items: 8

1.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have a weakened immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as . -Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin. -Unexplained weight loss . -Fever . -Soaking night sweats . -Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain . -Weakness and tiredness that don't go away . -Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen . Your doctor will diagnose lymphoma with a physical exam, blood tests, a chest x-ray, and a biopsy. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, biological therapy, or therapy to remove proteins from the blood. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. If you don't have symptoms, you may not need treatment right away. This is called watchful waiting. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44223
Concept ID:
C0024299
Neoplastic Process
2.

Multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a neoplastic plasma cell disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow microenvironment, monoclonal protein in the blood or urine, and associated organ dysfunction (Palumbo and Anderson, 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
10122
Concept ID:
C0026764
Neoplastic Process
3.

Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a heterogeneous group of malignant lymphoid neoplasms of B-cell origin characterized histologically by the presence of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in the vast majority of cases. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
799611
Concept ID:
CN206988
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hodgkin lymphoma

A typer of lymphoma characterized microscopically by multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
776519
Concept ID:
CN167915
Finding
5.

Multiple myeloma

A malignant plasma cell tumor growing within soft tissue or within the skeleton. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505979
Concept ID:
CN005898
Finding
6.

Lymphoma

A cancer originating in lymphocytes and presenting as a solid tumor of lymhpoid cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505322
Concept ID:
CN002422
Finding
7.

Fanconi anemia, complementation group E

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in 60%-75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature; abnormal skin pigmentation; malformations of the thumbs, forearms, skeletal system, eyes, kidneys and urinary tract, ears (and decreased hearing), heart, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system; hypogonadism; and developmental delay. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. By age 40 to 50 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of bone marrow failure is 90%; the incidence of hematologic malignancies (primarily acute myeloid leukemia) 10%-30%; and of nonhematologic malignancies (solid tumors, particularly of the head and neck, skin, GI tract, and genital tract) 25%-30%. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
463628
Concept ID:
C3160739
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Hodgkin lymphoma

Classic Hodgkin lymphoma is a lymph node cancer of germinal center B-cell origin. Hodgkin lymphoma tumors consist of a minority of malignant cells, known as 'Reed-Sternberg' (RS) cells, mixed with reactive lymphocytes and other benign inflammatory cells. A defining feature of RS cells is the presence of 2 nuclei (summary by Salipante et al., 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
9283
Concept ID:
C0019829
Neoplastic Process
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