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1.

Alternating hemiplegia of childhood

MedGen UID:
90925
Concept ID:
C0338488
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hemiplegia

Paralysis (complete loss of muscle function) in the arm, leg, and in some cases the face on one side of the body. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505188
Concept ID:
CN002089
Finding
3.

Tetraplegia

Paralysis of all four limbs, and trunk of the body below the level of an associated injury to the spinal cord. The etiology of quadriplegia is similar to that of paraplegia except that the lesion is in the cervical spinal cord rather than in the thoracic or lumbar segments of the spinal cord. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
19617
Concept ID:
C0034372
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Dystonia

Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive movements and/or postures. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be associated with tremor. Dystonia is often initiated or worsened by voluntary action and associated with overflow muscle activation. Dystonia can be classified clinically according to age of onset, body distribution, temporal pattern, and associated features (i.e., isolated dystonia – in which it is the only motor feature except tremor; combined dystonia – in which another movement disorder is present; or complex dystonia – in which other neurologic or systemic manifestations are present). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
3940
Concept ID:
C0013421
Sign or Symptom
5.

Alternating hemiplegia of childhood 2

Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a rare syndrome characterized by infantile onset of episodic hemi-or quadriplegia. Most cases are accompanied by dystonic posturing, choreoathetoid movements, abnormal ocular movements, developmental delay, and progressive cognitive impairment (summary by Heinzen et al., 2012). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of alternating hemiplegia of childhood, see AHC1 (104290). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766702
Concept ID:
C3553788
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Abnormality of movement

An abnormality of movement with a neurological basis characterized by changes in coordination and speed of voluntary movements. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506445
Concept ID:
CN116921
Finding
7.

Tetraplegia

Paralysis of all four limbs, and trunk of the body below the level of an associated injury to the spinal cord. The etiology of quadriplegia is similar to that of paraplegia except that the lesion is in the cervical spinal cord rather than in the thoracic or lumbar segments of the spinal cord. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505238
Concept ID:
CN002220
Finding
8.

Dystonia

An abnormally increased muscular tone that causes fixed abnormal postures. There is a slow, intermittent twisting motion that leads to exaggerated turning and posture of the extremities and trunk. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504804
Concept ID:
CN001220
Finding
9.

Parkinsonism

Characteristic neurologic anomaly resulting form degeneration of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra, a region of the midbrain, characterized clinically by shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficulty with walking and gait. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504793
Concept ID:
CN001191
Finding
10.

Fanconi anemia, complementation group E

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in 60%-75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature; abnormal skin pigmentation; malformations of the thumbs, forearms, skeletal system, eyes, kidneys and urinary tract, ears (and decreased hearing), heart, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system; hypogonadism; and developmental delay. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. By age 40 to 50 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of bone marrow failure is 90%; the incidence of hematologic malignancies (primarily acute myeloid leukemia) 10%-30%; and of nonhematologic malignancies (solid tumors, particularly of the head and neck, skin, GI tract, and genital tract) 25%-30%. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
463628
Concept ID:
C3160739
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Dystonia 12

The spectrum of ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders includes rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP), alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS) syndrome. While early reports emphasized the distinctness of RDP and AHC, it is increasingly evident that these conditions represent a spectrum related to mutation of ATP1A3. Because only ten individuals from three families and one individual with a de novo mutation have been described with CAPOS syndrome to date, its phenotype is less defined; however, some features overlap with RDP and AHC as well. RDP is characterized by abrupt onset of dystonia with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); a clear rostrocaudal (face>arm>leg) topological gradient of involvement; bulbar involvement; and absence of response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset is four to 55 years. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits develop in the majority of those affected, including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS syndrome (a mnemonic for cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and five years. Some acute symptoms resolve; disease progression and severity vary. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
358384
Concept ID:
C1868681
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome

Pendred syndrome (PDS) and DFNB4 comprise a phenotypic spectrum of hearing loss with or without other findings. Pendred syndrome is characterized by: severe-to-profound bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment that is usually congenital (or prelingual) and non-progressive; vestibular dysfunction; temporal bone abnormalities; and development of euthyroid goiter in late childhood to early adulthood. Variability of findings is considerable, even within the same family. DFNB4 is characterized by nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing impairment, vestibular dysfunction, and enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). Thyroid defects are not seen in DFNB4. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
355050
Concept ID:
C1863752
Finding; Finding
13.

Episodic quadriplegia

Intermittent episodes of paralysis of all four limbs. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
350829
Concept ID:
C1863062
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
14.

Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, X-linked

X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (X-linked AHC) is characterized by infantile-onset acute primary adrenal insufficiency at an average age of three weeks in approximately 60% of affected individuals. Onset in approximately 40% is in childhood. A few individuals present in adulthood with delayed-onset adrenal failure or partial hypogonadism due to partial forms of X-linked AHC. Adrenal insufficiency typically presents acutely in male infants with vomiting, feeding difficulty, dehydration, and shock caused by a salt-wasting episode. Hypoglycemia (sometimes presenting with seizures) or isolated salt loss may be the first symptom of X-linked AHC. Cortisol may be low or within the normal range, which is inappropriately low for a sick child. In older children, adrenal failure may be precipitated by intercurrent illness or stress. If untreated, adrenal insufficiency is rapidly lethal as a result of hyperkalemia, acidosis, hypoglycemia, and shock. Affected males typically have delayed puberty (onset age >14 years) or arrested puberty caused by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Early pubertal development with pubertal arrest has been reported in some cases. Males with classic X-linked AHC are infertile despite treatment with exogenous gonadotropin therapy or pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), although testicular sperm extraction-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (TESE-ICSI) has been successful in one case. Carrier females may very occasionally have symptoms of adrenal insufficiency or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism as a result of skewed X-chromosome inactivation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87442
Concept ID:
C0342482
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
15.

Parkinsonism

Characteristic neurologic anomaly resulting form degeneration of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra, a region of the midbrain, characterized clinically by shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficulty with walking and gait. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
66079
Concept ID:
C0242422
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Congenital adrenal hypoplasia

A type of adrenal hypoplasia with congenital onset. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
65094
Concept ID:
C0220766
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
17.

Movement disorder

Imagine if parts of your body moved when you didn't want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia is abnormal uncontrolled movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. . Nerve diseases cause many movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. Other causes include injuries, autoimmune diseases, infections and certain medicines. Many movement disorders are inherited, which means they run in families. Treatment varies by disorder. Medicine can cure some disorders. Others get better when an underlying disease is treated. Often, however, there is no cure. In that case, the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms and relieve pain.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10113
Concept ID:
C0026650
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
19.

Paralysis

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia. . Most paralysis is due to strokes or injuries such as spinal cord injury or a broken neck. Other causes of paralysis include. -Nerve diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. - Autoimmune diseases such as Guillain-Barre syndrome. - Bell's palsy, which affects muscles in the face. Polio used to be a cause of paralysis, but polio no longer occurs in the U.S.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
105510
Concept ID:
C0522224
Finding
20.

Spastic hemiplegia

A type of spastic cerebral palsy characterized by increased muscle tone of the arm and leg on the same side of the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
56345
Concept ID:
C0154694
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
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