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Results: 7

1.

Malignant neoplastic disease

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
2.

Breast carcinoma

The presence of a `carcinoma` (MPATH:549) of the `breast` (FMA:9601). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428324
Concept ID:
CN002714
Finding
3.

Neoplasm of breast

Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
264172
Concept ID:
C1458155
Neoplastic Process
4.

Chemical Carcinogenesis

The study of the processes by which normal cells are transformed into cancer cells by chemicals. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
108902
Concept ID:
C0596321
Neoplastic Process
5.

Carcinogenesis

The origin, production or development of cancer through genotypic and phenotypic changes which upset the normal balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Carcinogenesis generally requires a constellation of steps, which may occur quickly or over a period of many years. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
154544
Concept ID:
C0596263
Neoplastic Process
6.

Curcumin stain

A phytopolylphenol pigment isolated from the plant Curcuma longa, commonly known as tumeric, with a variety of pharmacologic properties. Curcumin blocks the formation of reactive-oxygen species, possesses anti-inflammatory properties as a result of inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX) and other enzymes involved in inflammation; and disrupts cell signal transduction by various mechanisms including inhibition of protein kinase C. These effects may play a role in the agent's observed antineoplastic properties, which include inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and suppression of chemically induced carcinogenesis and tumor growth in animal models of cancer. Check for "http://www.cancer.gov/Search/ClinicalTrialsLink.aspx?id=43115&idtype=1" active clinical trials or "http://www.cancer.gov/Search/ClinicalTrialsLink.aspx?id=43115&idtype=1&closed=1" closed clinical trials using this agent. ("http://nciterms.nci.nih.gov:80/NCIBrowser/ConceptReport.jsp?dictionary=NCI_Thesaurus&code=C401" NCI Thesaurus) [from PDQ]

MedGen UID:
1184
Concept ID:
C0010467
Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Malignant tumor of breast

Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than any cancer except lung cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. Risks that you cannot change include: -Age - the chance of getting breast cancer rises as a woman gets older . -Genes - there are two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, that greatly increase the risk. Women who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested. . -Personal factors - beginning periods before age 12 or going through menopause after age 55. Other risks include being overweight, using hormone replacement therapy (also called menopausal hormone therapy), taking birth control pills, drinking alcohol, not having children or having your first child after age 35 or having dense breasts. Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a change in size or shape of the breast or discharge from a nipple. Breast self-exam and mammography can help find breast cancer early when it is most treatable. Treatment may consist of radiation, lumpectomy, mastectomy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy. Men can have breast cancer, too, but the number of cases is small. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
651
Concept ID:
C0006142
Neoplastic Process

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