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MedGen for PubMed (Select 22815498)

Items: 8

1.

Pain

MedGen UID:
776584
Concept ID:
C2364139
Finding
2.

Sciatica

Sciatica is a symptom of a problem with the sciatic nerve, the largest nerve in the body. It controls muscles in the back of your knee and lower leg and provides feeling to the back of your thigh, part of your lower leg, and the sole of your foot. When you have sciatica, you have pain, weakness, numbness, or tingling. It can start in the lower back and extend down your leg to your calf, foot, or even your toes. It's usually on only one side of your body. Causes of sciatica include. -A ruptured intervertebral disk. -Narrowing of the spinal canal that puts pressure on the nerve, called spinal stenosis. -An injury such as a pelvic fracture. In many cases no cause can be found. Sometimes sciatica goes away on its own. Treatment, if needed, depends on the cause of the problem. It may include exercises, medicines, and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
19893
Concept ID:
C0036396
Sign or Symptom
3.

Low back pain

An unpleasant sensation characterized by physical discomfort (such as pricking, throbbing, or aching) localized to the lower back. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505536
Concept ID:
CN003084
Finding
4.

Back pain

MedGen UID:
409546
Concept ID:
C1963071
Finding
5.

Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), club feet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect, vision, and hearing are normal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
374477
Concept ID:
C1840471
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations

MedGen UID:
373381
Concept ID:
C1837657
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Mononeuropathy

A focal lesion of a single peripheral nerve. Damage to a sensory nerve is accompanied by sensory impairment of all modalities in the affected anatomic distribution. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506331
Concept ID:
CN008688
Finding
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