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Results: 20

1.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving both upper motor neurons (UMN) and lower motor neurons (LMN). UMN signs include hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response, increased muscle tone, and weakness in a topographic representation. LMN signs include weakness, muscle wasting, hyporeflexia, muscle cramps, and fasciculations. Initial presentation varies. Affected individuals typically present with either asymmetric focal weakness of the extremities (stumbling or poor handgrip) or bulbar findings (dysarthria, dysphagia). Other findings may include muscle fasciculations, muscle cramps, and labile affect, but not necessarily mood. Regardless of initial symptoms, atrophy and weakness eventually affect other muscles. The mean age of onset is 56 years in individuals with no known family history and 46 years in individuals with more than one affected family member (familial ALS or FALS). Average disease duration is about three years, but it can vary significantly. Death usually results from compromise of the respiratory muscles. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
274
Concept ID:
C0002736
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Ataxia

unable to coordinate muscle movement [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
13945
Concept ID:
C0004134
Sign or Symptom
3.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

MedGen UID:
506059
Concept ID:
CN006437
Finding
4.

Neurodegeneration

Progressive loss of neural cells and tissue. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505144
Concept ID:
CN001976
Finding
5.

Ataxia

Cerebellar ataxia refers to ataxia due to dysfunction of the cerebellum. This causes a variety of elementary neurological deficits including asynergy (lack of coordination between muscles, limbs and joints), dysmetria (lack of ability to judge distances that can lead to under- oder overshoot in grasping movements), and dysdiadochokinesia (inability to perform rapid movements requiring antagonizing muscle groups to be switched on and off repeatedly). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504767
Concept ID:
CN001146
Finding
6.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 2

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, including nystagmus, slow saccadic eye movements and, in some individuals, ophthalmoparesis or parkinsonism. Pyramidal findings are present; deep tendon reflexes are brisk early on and are absent later in the course. Age of onset is typically in the fourth decade with a ten- to 15-year disease duration. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
155704
Concept ID:
C0752121
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Motor neuron disease

Diseases characterized by a selective degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord, brainstem, or motor cortex. Clinical subtypes are distinguished by the major site of degeneration. In AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS there is involvement of upper, lower, and brainstem motor neurons. In progressive muscular atrophy and related syndromes (see MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL) the motor neurons in the spinal cord are primarily affected. With progressive bulbar palsy (BULBAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE), the initial degeneration occurs in the brainstem. In primary lateral sclerosis, the cortical neurons are affected in isolation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
38785
Concept ID:
C0085084
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type19

MedGen UID:
833730
Concept ID:
CN230137
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2

MedGen UID:
797270
Concept ID:
CN197015
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 36

SCA36 is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult-onset gait ataxia, eye movement abnormalities, tongue fasciculations, and variable upper motor neuron signs. Some affected individuals may develop hearing loss (summary by Garcia-Murias et al,. 2012). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
483339
Concept ID:
C3472711
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 32

Spinocerebellar ataxia-32 (SCA32) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by ataxia, variable mental impairment, and azoospermia in males (summary by Jiang et al., 2010). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462693
Concept ID:
C3151343
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 35

The hereditary ataxias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by slowly progressive incoordination of gait and often associated with poor coordination of hands, speech, and eye movements. Frequently, atrophy of the cerebellum occurs. In this GeneReview the hereditary ataxias are categorized by mode of inheritance and gene (or chromosomal locus) in which pathogenic variants occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
450182
Concept ID:
CN077707
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 20

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 20 (SCA20) is characterized by a slowly progressive ataxia and dysarthria. Approximately two thirds of those affected also display palatal tremor ("myoclonus") and/or abnormal phonation clinically resembling spasmodic adductor dysphonia. Dysarthria, which may be abrupt in onset, precedes the onset of ataxia in about two thirds of affected individuals, sometimes by a number of years. Hypermetric horizontal saccades (without nystagmus or disturbance of vestibulo-ocular reflex gain) are seen in about half of affected persons. Although minor pyramidal signs (brisk knee jerks, crossed adductor spread) may be seen, spasticity and extensor plantar responses are not. Cognition is normal. Clinical information is based on the findings in 16 personally examined affected members of a single Australian family of Anglo-Celtic descent. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
373352
Concept ID:
C1837541
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 27

The hereditary ataxias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by slowly progressive incoordination of gait and often associated with poor coordination of hands, speech, and eye movements. Frequently, atrophy of the cerebellum occurs. In this GeneReview the hereditary ataxias are categorized by mode of inheritance and gene (or chromosomal locus) in which pathogenic variants occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
373075
Concept ID:
C1836383
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 12

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 (SCA12) is characterized by onset of action tremor of the upper extremities in the fourth decade, slowly progressing to include ataxia and other cerebellar and cortical signs. Given the small number of individuals known to have SCA12, it is possible that other clinical manifestations have not yet been recognized. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
347653
Concept ID:
C1858501
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 13

In the families described to date, the phenotype of spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) has ranged from slowly progressive childhood-onset cerebellar gait ataxia associated with cerebellar dysarthria and often accompanied by mild intellectual disability and occasional seizures to adult-onset progressive ataxia. Life span is not shortened and many persons live beyond age 70 years, but assistance with gait may be required as the disease progresses. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
344297
Concept ID:
C1854488
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 14

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14) is characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and nystagmus. Axial myoclonus, cognitive impairment, tremor, and sensory loss may also be observed. Parkinsonian features including rigidity and tremor have been described in some families. Findings seen in other ataxia disorders (e.g., dysphagia, dysphonia) may also occur in SCA14. Age of onset ranges from childhood to the sixth decade. Life span is not shortened. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
343106
Concept ID:
C1854369
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 23

The hereditary ataxias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by slowly progressive incoordination of gait and often associated with poor coordination of hands, speech, and eye movements. Frequently, atrophy of the cerebellum occurs. In this GeneReview the hereditary ataxias are categorized by mode of inheritance and gene (or chromosomal locus) in which pathogenic variants occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
339942
Concept ID:
C1853250
Disease or Syndrome

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