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Results: 18

1.

Autism spectrum disorders

Autism comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders – collectively referred to as “autism spectrum disorders” (ASD) – that share common features of impaired social relationships, impaired language and communication, and repetitive behaviors or a narrow range of interests. For most children with autism, symptoms develop gradually, although approximately 30% have a "regressive" onset usually between ages 18 and 24 months. About 50%-70% of children with autism are identified as intellectually disabled by nonverbal IQ testing and approximately 25% develop seizures. Autism can be considered complex (i.e., presence of dysmorphic features and/or microcephaly) or essential (i.e., absence of physical abnormalities and microcephaly). About 25% of children who fit the diagnostic criteria for ASD at age two to three years subsequently begin to talk and communicate, and by age six to seven years blend to varying degrees into the regular school population. The remaining 75% have lifelong disability requiring intensive parental, school, and social support. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
307153
Concept ID:
C1510586
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
2.

Head & Shoulders brand of selenium disulfide

MedGen UID:
280641
Concept ID:
C1531398
Pharmacologic Substance
3.

Autistic behavior

A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual (DSM-IV). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504575
Concept ID:
CN000686
Finding
4.

Autism

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted and repetitive behavior. Autism begins in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual (DSM-IV). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504569
Concept ID:
CN000674
Finding
5.

Angelman syndrome-like

MedGen UID:
472054
Concept ID:
CN128785
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Autistic disorder of childhood onset

Autism comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders – collectively referred to as “autism spectrum disorders” (ASD) – that share common features of impaired social relationships, impaired language and communication, and repetitive behaviors or a narrow range of interests. For most children with autism, symptoms develop gradually, although approximately 30% have a "regressive" onset usually between ages 18 and 24 months. About 50%-70% of children with autism are identified as intellectually disabled by nonverbal IQ testing and approximately 25% develop seizures. Autism can be considered complex (i.e., presence of dysmorphic features and/or microcephaly) or essential (i.e., absence of physical abnormalities and microcephaly). About 25% of children who fit the diagnostic criteria for ASD at age two to three years subsequently begin to talk and communicate, and by age six to seven years blend to varying degrees into the regular school population. The remaining 75% have lifelong disability requiring intensive parental, school, and social support. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
13966
Concept ID:
C0004352
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Interauricular communication

MedGen UID:
831845
Concept ID:
CN226682
Finding
8.

Does not

MedGen UID:
721427
Concept ID:
C1299585
Finding
9.

Related

MedGen UID:
619805
Concept ID:
C0445223
Finding
10.

Functional disorder

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
Pathologic Function
11.

Adhesion

Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby organs, or to the wall of the abdomen. They can pull sections of the intestines out of place. This may block food from passing through the intestine. Adhesions can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the abdomen. Almost everyone who has surgery on the abdomen gets adhesions. Some adhesions don't cause any problems. But when they partly or completely block the intestines, they cause symptoms such as: -Severe abdominal pain or cramping. -Vomiting. -Bloating. -An inability to pass gas. -Constipation. Adhesions can sometimes cause infertility in women by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus. No tests are available to detect adhesions. Doctors usually find them during surgery to diagnose other problems. Some adhesions go away by themselves. If they partly block your intestines, a diet low in fiber can allow food to move easily through the affected area. If you have a complete intestinal obstruction, it is life threatening. You should get immediate medical attention and may need surgery. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7891
Concept ID:
C0001511
Pathologic Function
12.

Atrial septal defect

defect in the wall between the lower chambers of the heart [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
6753
Concept ID:
C0018817
Congenital Abnormality
13.

Diagnosis, Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
138165
Concept ID:
C0376338
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
14.

Mental Disorders Diagnosed in Childhood

Those psychiatric disorders usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence. These disorders can also be first diagnosed during other life stages. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
101230
Concept ID:
C0525040
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
15.

Mental disorder

Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including: -Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias. -Bipolar disorder. -Depression. -Mood disorders. -Personality disorders. -Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play a role. Your life experiences, such as stress or a history of abuse, may also matter. Biological factors can also be part of the cause. A traumatic brain injury can lead to a mental disorder. A mother's exposure to viruses or toxic chemicals while pregnant may play a part. Other factors may increase your risk, such as use of illegal drugs or having a serious medical condition like cancer. Medications and counseling can help many mental disorders. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14047
Concept ID:
C0004936
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
16.

Child Development Disorders, Pervasive

Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
887
Concept ID:
C0008074
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
17.

Head circumference with caput

MedGen UID:
603398
Concept ID:
C0424715
Finding
18.

Autism 16

Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). For a discussion of heterogeneity of autism, see 209850. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462027
Concept ID:
C3150677
Finding

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