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Items: 6

1.

Colorectal cancer

MedGen UID:
808161
Concept ID:
CN221574
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Familial colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that is common in both men and women. In addition to lifestyle and environmental risk factors, gene defects can contribute to an inherited predisposition to CRC. CRC is caused by changes in different molecular pathogenic pathways, such as chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Chromosome instability is the most common alteration and is present in almost 85% of all cases (review by Schweiger et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Colorectal Cancer Mutations in a single gene result in a marked predisposition to colorectal cancer in 2 distinct syndromes: familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 175100) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; see 120435). FAP is caused by mutations in the APC gene (611731), whereas HNPCC is caused by mutations in several genes, including MSH2 (609309), MLH1 (120436), PMS1 (600258), PMS2 (600259), MSH6 (600678), TGFBR2 (190182), and MLH3 (604395). Epigenetic silencing of MSH2 results in a form of HNPCC (see HNPCC8, 613244). Other colorectal cancer syndromes include autosomal recessive adenomatous polyposis (608456), which is caused by mutations in the MUTYH gene (604933), and oligodontia-colorectal cancer syndrome (608615), which is caused by mutations in the AXIN2 gene (604025). The CHEK2 gene (604373) has been implicated in susceptibility to colorectal cancer in Finnish patients. A germline mutation in the PLA2G2A gene (172411) was identified in a patient with colorectal cancer. Germline susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer have also been identified. CRCS1 (608812) is conferred by mutation in the GALNT12 gene (610290) on chromosome 9q22; CRCS2 (611469) maps to chromosome 8q24; CRCS3 (612229) is conferred by variation in the SMAD7 gene (602932) on chromosome 18; CRCS4 (601228) is conferred by variation on 15q that causes increased and ectopic expression of the GREM1 gene (603054); CRCS5 (612230) maps to chromosome 10p14; CRCS6 (612231) maps to chromosome 8q23; CRCS7 (612232) maps to chromosome 11q23; CRCS8 (612589) maps to chromosome 14q22; CRCS9 (612590) maps to 16q22; CRCS10 (612591) is conferred by mutation in the POLD1 gene (174761) on chromosome 19q13; CRCS11 (612592) maps to chromosome 20p12; and CRCS12 (615083) is conferred by mutation in the POLE gene (174762) on chromosome 12q24. Somatic mutations in many different genes, including KRAS (190070), PIK3CA (171834), BRAF (164757), CTNNB1 (116806), FGFR3 (134934), AXIN2 (604025), AKT1 (164730), MCC (159350), MYH11 (160745), and PARK2 (602544) have been identified in colorectal cancer. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
430218
Concept ID:
CN029768
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Carcinoma of colon

Cancer that forms in the tissues of the colon (the longest part of the large intestine). Most colon cancers are adenocarcinomas (cancers that begin in cells that make and release mucus and other fluids). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
147065
Concept ID:
C0699790
Neoplastic Process
4.

Cranioectodermal dysplasia 1

Cranioectodermal dysplasia is a disorder that affects many parts of the body. The most common features involve bone abnormalities and abnormal development of certain tissues known as ectodermal tissues, which include the skin, hair, nails, and teeth. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary among affected individuals, even among members of the same family.Distinctive abnormalities of the skull and face are common in people with cranioectodermal dysplasia. Most affected individuals have a prominent forehead (frontal bossing) and an elongated head (dolichocephaly) due to abnormal fusion of certain skull bones (sagittal craniosynostosis). A variety of facial abnormalities can occur in people with this condition; these include low-set ears that may also be rotated backward, an increased distance between the inner corners of the eyes (telecanthus), and outside corners of the eyes that point upward or downward (upslanting or downslanting palpebral fissures) among others.Development of bones in the rest of the skeleton is also affected in this condition. Abnormalities in the long bones of the arms and legs (metaphyseal dysplasia) lead to short limbs and short stature. In addition, affected individuals often have short fingers (brachydactyly). Some people with this condition have short rib bones and a narrow rib cage, which can cause breathing problems, especially in affected newborns.Abnormal development of ectodermal tissues in people with cranioectodermal dysplasia can lead to sparse hair, small or missing teeth, short fingernails and toenails, and loose skin.Cranioectodermal dysplasia can affect additional organs and tissues in the body. A kidney disorder known as nephronophthisis occurs in many people with this condition, and it can lead to a life-threatening failure of kidney function known as end-stage renal disease. Abnormalities of the liver, heart, or eyes also occur in people with cranioectodermal dysplasia.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
96586
Concept ID:
C0432235
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
5.

Glutaric aciduria, type 2

Glutaric aciduria II (GA II) is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of fatty acid, amino acid, and choline metabolism. It differs from GA I (231670) in that multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies result in large excretion not only of glutaric acid, but also of lactic, ethylmalonic, butyric, isobutyric, 2-methyl-butyric, and isovaleric acids. GA II results from deficiency of any 1 of 3 molecules: the alpha (ETFA) and beta (ETFB) subunits of electron transfer flavoprotein, and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH). The clinical picture of GA II due to the different defects appears to be indistinguishable; each defect can lead to a range of mild or severe cases, depending presumably on the location and nature of the intragenic lesion, i.e., mutation, in each case (Goodman, 1993; Olsen et al., 2003). The heterogeneous clinical features of patients with MADD fall into 3 classes: a neonatal-onset form with congenital anomalies (type I), a neonatal-onset form without congenital anomalies (type II), and a late-onset form (type III). The neonatal-onset forms are usually fatal and are characterized by severe nonketotic hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis, multisystem involvement, and excretion of large amounts of fatty acid- and amino acid-derived metabolites. Symptoms and age at presentation of late-onset MADD are highly variable and characterized by recurrent episodes of lethargy, vomiting, hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis, and hepatomegaly often preceded by metabolic stress. Muscle involvement in the form of pain, weakness, and lipid storage myopathy also occurs. The organic aciduria in patients with the late-onset form of MADD is often intermittent and only evident during periods of illness or catabolic stress (summary by Frerman and Goodman, 2001). Importantly, riboflavin treatment has been shown to ameliorate the symptoms and metabolic profiles in many MADD patients, particularly those with type III, the late-onset and mildest form (Liang et al., 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75696
Concept ID:
C0268596
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Diaphyseal dysplasia

Camurati-Engelmann disease (CED) is characterized by hyperostosis of the long bones and the skull, proximal muscle weakness, severe limb pain, a wide-based, waddling gait, and joint contractures. Facial features such as frontal bossing, enlargement of the mandible, proptosis, and cranial nerve impingement resulting in facial palsy are seen in severely affected individuals later in life. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
4268
Concept ID:
C0011989
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
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