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Items: 7

1.

Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome type 1

Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of morphogenesis that results in abnormal development of the anterior segment of the eye, and results in blindness from glaucoma in approximately 50% of affected individuals (Fitch and Kaback, 1978). Systemic anomalies have also been associated, including dental hypoplasia, failure of involution of periumbilical skin, and maxillary hypoplasia (Alkemade, 1969). See 109120 for a form of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome associated with partially absent eye muscles, hydrocephalus, and skeletal abnormalities. Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly has also been observed in some patients with small vessel disease of the brain, see 607595. A closely related ocular disorder, iridogoniodysgenesis, can also be caused by mutation in the FOXC1 and PITX2 genes; see IRID1 (601631) and IRID2 (137600), respectively. Genetic Heterogeneity of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome Linkage studies indicate that a second type of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome maps to chromosome 13q14 (RIEG2; 601499). A third form of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (RIEG3; 602482) is caused by mutation in the FOXC1 gene (601090) on chromosome 6p25. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
811487
Concept ID:
C3714873
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
2.

Rieger syndrome

Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is primarily an eye disorder, although it can also affect other parts of the body. This condition is characterized by abnormalities of the front part of the eye, an area known as the anterior segment. For example, the colored part of the eye (the iris), may be thin or poorly developed. The iris normally has a single central hole, called the pupil, through which light enters the eye. People with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome often have a pupil that is off-center (corectopia) or extra holes in the iris that can look like multiple pupils (polycoria). This condition can also cause abnormalities of the cornea, which is the clear front covering of the eye.About half of affected individuals develop glaucoma, a serious condition that increases pressure inside the eye. When glaucoma occurs with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, it most often develops in late childhood or adolescence, although it can occur as early as infancy. Glaucoma can cause vision loss or blindness.The signs and symptoms of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome can also affect other parts of the body. Many affected individuals have distinctive facial features such as widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism); a flattened mid-face with a broad, flat nasal bridge; and a prominent forehead. The condition is also associated with dental abnormalities including unusually small teeth (microdontia) or fewer than normal teeth (oligodontia). Some people with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome have extra folds of skin around their belly button (redundant periumbilical skin). Other, less common features can include heart defects, the opening of the urethra on the underside of the penis (hypospadias), narrowing of the anus (anal stenosis), and abnormalities of the pituitary gland that can result in slow growth.Researchers have described at least three types of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. The types, which are numbered 1 through 3, are distinguished by their genetic cause.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
78558
Concept ID:
C0265341
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Aarskog syndrome

Aarskog-Scott syndrome, also known as faciogenital dysplasia, is an X-linked disorder characterized by short stature, hypertelorism, shawl scrotum, and brachydactyly, although there is wide phenotypic variability and other features, such as joint hyperextensibility, short nose, widow's peak, and inguinal hernia, may also occur. Most patients do not have mental retardation, but some may have neurobehavioral features. Carrier females may present with subtle features, such as widow's peak or short stature (summary by Orrico et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
61234
Concept ID:
C0175701
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
4.

Azorean disease

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and variable findings including a dystonic-rigid syndrome, a parkinsonian syndrome, or a combined syndrome of dystonia and peripheral neuropathy. Neurologic findings tend to evolve as the disease progresses. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
9841
Concept ID:
C0024408
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Mental disorder

Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including. -Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias. -Bipolar disorder. -Depression. -Mood disorders. -Personality disorders. -Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play a role. Your life experiences, such as stress or a history of abuse, may also matter. Biological factors can also be part of the cause. A traumatic brain injury can lead to a mental disorder. A mother's exposure to viruses or toxic chemicals while pregnant may play a part. Other factors may increase your risk, such as use of illegal drugs or having a serious medical condition like cancer. Medications and counseling can help many mental disorders. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14047
Concept ID:
C0004936
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
6.

Alcohol dependence

For most adults, moderate alcohol use is probably not harmful. However, about 18 million adult Americans have an alcohol use disorder. This means that their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes. -Craving - a strong need to drink. -Loss of control - not being able to stop drinking once you've started. -Physical dependence - withdrawal symptoms. -Tolerance - the need to drink more alcohol to feel the same effect. With alcohol abuse, you are not physically dependent, but you still have a serious problem. The drinking may cause problems at home, work, or school. It may cause you to put yourself in dangerous situations, or lead to legal or social problems. Another common problem is binge drinking. It is drinking about five or more drinks in two hours for men. For women, it is about four or more drinks in two hours. Too much alcohol is dangerous. Heavy drinking can increase the risk of certain cancers. It can cause damage to the liver, brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the risk of death from car crashes, injuries, homicide, and suicide. If you want to stop drinking, there is help. Start by talking to your health care provider. Treatment may include medicines, counseling, and support groups. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1801
Concept ID:
C0001973
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Opioid dependence 1

MedGen UID:
400600
Concept ID:
C1864733
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