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Items: 8

1.

Abnormality of the lung

MedGen UID:
807349
Concept ID:
CN218444
Finding
2.

Disorder of lung

When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to work and grow. During a normal day, you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in the U.S. have lung disease. If all types of lung disease are lumped together, it is the number three killer in the United States. The term lung disease refers to many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer, and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7399
Concept ID:
C0024115
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Respiratory failure

Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such as your heart and brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't remove carbon dioxide (a waste gas) from your blood. Too much carbon dioxide in your blood can harm your body's organs. Diseases and conditions that affect your breathing can cause respiratory failure. Examples include. -Lung diseases such as COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, and cystic fibrosis. -Conditions that affect the nerves and muscles that control breathing, such as spinal cord injuries, muscular dystrophy and stroke. -Damage to the tissues and ribs around the lungs. An injury to the chest can cause this damage. -Drug or alcohol overdose. -Injuries from inhaling smoke or harmful fumes. Treatment for respiratory failure depends on whether the condition is acute (short-term) or chronic (ongoing) and how severe it is. It also depends on the underlying cause. You may receive oxygen therapy and other treatment to help you breathe. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
257837
Concept ID:
C1145670
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

Abnormal accumulation of surfactant-like, periodic acid-schiff-positive lipoproteinaceous material in macrophages within the alveolar spaces and distal bronchioles. This results in gas exchange impairment leading to dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
18760
Concept ID:
C0034050
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Respiratory failure

A severe form of respiratory insufficiency characterized by inadequate gas exchange such that the levels of oxygen or carbon dioxide cannot be maintained within normal limits. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505385
Concept ID:
CN002603
Finding
6.

Alveolar proteinosis

Abnormal accumulation of surfactant-like, periodic acid-schiff-positive lipoproteinaceous material in macrophages within the alveolar spaces and distal bronchioles. This results in gas exchange impairment leading to dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
446763
Concept ID:
CN005676
Finding
7.

Inflammation

A microscopic finding indicating the presence of acute, subacute or chronic inflammation in a tissue sample. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7072
Concept ID:
C0021368
Pathologic Function
8.

Autoimmune disease

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body. No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling. The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2135
Concept ID:
C0004364
Disease or Syndrome
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