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MedGen for PubMed (Select 22544507)

Items: 1 to 20 of 24

1.

Tuberous sclerosis syndrome

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) involves abnormalities of the skin (hypomelanotic macules, facial angiofibromas, shagreen patches, fibrous facial plaques, ungual fibromas); brain (cortical tubers, subependymal nodules [SENs] and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas [SEGAs], seizures, intellectual disability/developmental delay); kidney (angiomyolipomas, cysts, renal cell carcinomas); heart (rhabdomyomas, arrhythmias); and lungs (lymphangioleiomyomatosis [LAM]). CNS tumors are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality; renal disease is the second leading cause of early death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
22518
Concept ID:
C0041341
Neoplastic Process
2.

Neurofibromas

The presence of multiple cutaneous neurofibromas. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504707
Concept ID:
CN001002
Finding
3.

Adenoma sebaceum

The presence of a sebaceous adenoma with origin in the sebum secreting cells of the skin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
429434
Concept ID:
CN008580
Finding
4.

Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome

MedGen UID:
419089
Concept ID:
C2931482
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Tuberous sclerosis 2

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder characterized by hamartomas in multiple organ systems, including the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and lung. These changes can result in epilepsy, learning difficulties, behavioral problems, and renal failure, among other complications (reviews by Crino et al., 2006 and Curatolo et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of tuberous sclerosis, see tuberous sclerosis-1 (191100), caused by mutation in the TSC1 gene (605284) on chromosome 9q34. Approximately 10 to 30% of cases of tuberous sclerosis are due to mutations in the TSC1 gene: the frequency of cases due to mutations in the TSC2 gene is consistently higher. TSC2 mutations are associated with more severe disease (Crino et al., 2006) (see GENOTYPE/PHENOTYPE CORRELATIONS section). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
348170
Concept ID:
C1860707
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Tuberous sclerosis 1

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) involves abnormalities of the skin (hypomelanotic macules, facial angiofibromas, shagreen patches, fibrous facial plaques, ungual fibromas); brain (cortical tubers, subependymal nodules [SENs] and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas [SEGAs], seizures, intellectual disability/developmental delay); kidney (angiomyolipomas, cysts, renal cell carcinomas); heart (rhabdomyomas, arrhythmias); and lungs (lymphangioleiomyomatosis [LAM]). CNS tumors are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality; renal disease is the second leading cause of early death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
344288
Concept ID:
C1854465
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Autosomal dominant inheritance

Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
9.

Angiofibromas

A benign, morphologic variant of fibroma characterized by the presence of numerous dilated vascular channels. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104928
Concept ID:
C0206731
Neoplastic Process
10.

Subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma

A benign, slowly growing tumor (WHO grade I) typically arising in the wall of the lateral ventricles and composed of large ganglioid astrocytes. It is the most common CNS neoplasm in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and typically occurs during the first two decades of life. (WHO) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61446
Concept ID:
C0205768
Neoplastic Process
11.

Neurofibromatosis, type 1

Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is characterized by multiple café-au-lait spots, axillary and inguinal freckling, multiple cutaneous neurofibromas, and iris Lisch nodules. Learning disabilities are present in at least 50% of individuals with NF1. Less common but potentially more serious manifestations include plexiform neurofibromas, optic nerve and other central nervous system gliomas, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, scoliosis, tibial dysplasia, and vasculopathy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
18013
Concept ID:
C0027831
Neoplastic Process
12.

Malformation of cortical development

Abnormalities in the development of the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These include malformations arising from abnormal neuronal and glial CELL PROLIFERATION or APOPTOSIS (Group I); abnormal neuronal migration (Group II); and abnormal establishment of cortical organization (Group III). Many INBORN METABOLIC BRAIN DISORDERS affecting CNS formation are often associated with cortical malformations. They are common causes of EPILEPSY and developmental delay. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
364975
Concept ID:
C1955869
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hereditary cancer-predisposing syndrome

The condition of a pattern of malignancies within a family, but not every individual's necessarily having the same neoplasm. Characteristically the tumor tends to occur at an earlier than average age, individuals may have more than one primary tumor, the tumors may be multicentric, usually more than 25 percent of the individuals in direct lineal descent from the proband are affected, and the cancer predisposition in these families behaves as an autosomal dominant trait with about 60 percent penetrance. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14326
Concept ID:
C0027672
Neoplastic Process
15.

Nervous tissue neoplasm

Neoplasms composed of nerve tissue. This concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the nervous system or its component nerves. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14324
Concept ID:
C0027665
Neoplastic Process
16.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Neoplasm

A general term for autonomous tissue growth in which the malignancy status has not been established and for which the transformed cell type has not been specifically identified. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10294
Concept ID:
C0027651
Neoplastic Process
18.

Tuberous Sclerosis 13

MedGen UID:
833663
Concept ID:
CN229763
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Tuberous Sclerosis 12

MedGen UID:
833650
Concept ID:
CN229766
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Cortical dysplasia, complex, with other brain malformations

Complex cortical dysplasia with other brain malformations (CDCBM) is a disorder of aberrant neuronal migration and disturbed axonal guidance. Affected individuals have mild to severe mental retardation, strabismus, axial hypotonia, and spasticity. Brain imaging shows variable malformations of cortical development, including polymicrogyria, gyral disorganization, and fusion of the basal ganglia, as well as thin corpus callosum, hypoplastic brainstem, and dysplastic cerebellar vermis. Extraocular muscles are not involved (summary by Poirier et al., 2010). Mutation in the TUBB3 gene can also cause congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles-3A (CFEOM3A; 600638), a milder and somewhat different neurologic phenotype. Genetic Heterogeneity of Complex Cortical Dysplasia With Other Brain Malformations See also CDCBM2 (615282), caused by mutation in the KIF5C gene (604593) on chromosome 2q23; CDCBM3 (615411), caused by mutation in the KIF2A gene (602591) on chromosome 5q12; CDCBM4 (615412), caused by mutation in the TUBG1 gene (191135) on chromosome 17q21; CDCBM5 (615763), caused by mutation in the TUBB2A gene (615101) on chromosome 6p25; and CDCBM6 (615771), caused by mutation in the TUBB gene (191130) on chromosome 6p21 [OMIM] [from NCBI]

MedGen UID:
832902
Concept ID:
CN228165
Disease or Syndrome
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