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Results: 1 to 20 of 55

1.

TANDEM

MedGen UID:
36523
Concept ID:
C0075804
Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Malignant neoplastic disease

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
3.

Malignant tumor of breast

Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than any cancer except lung cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. Risks that you cannot change include: -Age - the chance of getting breast cancer rises as a woman gets older . -Genes - there are two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, that greatly increase the risk. Women who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested. . -Personal factors - beginning periods before age 12 or going through menopause after age 55. Other risks include being overweight, using hormone replacement therapy (also called menopausal hormone therapy), taking birth control pills, drinking alcohol, not having children or having your first child after age 35 or having dense breasts. Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a change in size or shape of the breast or discharge from a nipple. Breast self-exam and mammography can help find breast cancer early when it is most treatable. Treatment may consist of radiation, lumpectomy, mastectomy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy. Men can have breast cancer, too, but the number of cases is small. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
651
Concept ID:
C0006142
Neoplastic Process
4.

Breast carcinoma

The presence of a `carcinoma` (MPATH:549) of the `breast` (FMA:9601). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428324
Concept ID:
CN002714
Finding
5.

Neoplasm of breast

Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
264172
Concept ID:
C1458155
Neoplastic Process
6.

Malignant tumor of prostate

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, being African-American, and some genetic changes. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include: -Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling. -Low back pain. -Pain with ejaculation. Your doctor will diagnose prostate cancer by feeling the prostate through the wall of the rectum or doing a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Other tests include ultrasound, x-rays, or a biopsy. Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
138169
Concept ID:
C0376358
Neoplastic Process
7.

Prostate cancer

A cancer of the `prostate` (FMA:9600). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506673
Concept ID:
CN167851
Finding
8.

BRCA2 gene mutation

A mutation that is typically a heritable, permanent change in the nucleotide sequence of the BRCA2 gene. Single nucleotide substitutions and small deletions or insertions (1-20 bases) account for the majority of mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Most of these alterations result in a truncated form of the breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein. Mutations in the BRCA2 gene predispose males to breast cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
267020
Concept ID:
C1511024
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
9.

Malignant tumor of ovary

The ovaries are part of the female reproductive system. They produce a woman's eggs and female hormones. Each ovary is about the size and shape of an almond. Cancer of the ovary is not common, but it causes more deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian cancer may have no symptoms or just mild symptoms until the disease is in an advanced stage. Then it is hard to treat. Symptoms may include: -A heavy feeling in the pelvis. -Pain in the lower abdomen. - Bleeding from the vagina. - Weight gain or loss. - Abnormal periods. - Unexplained back pain that gets worse. - Gas, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite. To diagnose ovarian cancer, doctors do one or more tests. They include a physical exam, a pelvic exam, lab tests, ultrasound, or a biopsy. Treatment is usually surgery followed by chemotherapy. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
216027
Concept ID:
C1140680
Neoplastic Process
10.

Neoplasm of ovary

Ovarian cancer, the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, is characterized by advanced presentation with loco-regional dissemination in the peritoneal cavity and the rare incidence of visceral metastases (Chi et al., 2001). These typical features relate to the biology of the disease, which is a principal determinant of outcome (Auersperg et al., 2001). Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most common form and encompasses 5 major histologic subtypes: papillary serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and transitional cell. Epithelial ovarian cancer arises as a result of genetic alterations sustained by the ovarian surface epithelium (Stany et al., 2008; Soslow, 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
181539
Concept ID:
C0919267
Neoplastic Process
11.

Base Pairing

Interacting selectively and non-covalently with nucleic acid via hydrogen bonds between the bases of a gene product molecule and the bases of a target nucleic acid molecule. [GOC:krc] [from GO]

MedGen UID:
108706
Concept ID:
C0600436
Molecular Function
12.

Severe

A term used to describe cells that look abnormal under a microscope. These cells are more likely to grow and spread quickly than cells in low-grade cancer or in growths that may become cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
13.

Female Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the female URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, FEMALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318599
Concept ID:
C1720887
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Female Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications

Pathological processes of the female URINARY TRACT, the reproductive system (GENITALIA, FEMALE), and disorders related to PREGNANCY. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318565
Concept ID:
C1720765
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Epithelial neoplasm

neoplasm of epithelial origin, ranging from benign (adenoma and papilloma) to malignant (carcinoma). [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
277963
Concept ID:
C1368683
Neoplastic Process
16.

Duplication of chromosome

An aberration in which an extra chromosome or a chromosomal segment is made. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
275730
Concept ID:
C1516516
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
17.

Carcinomatosis

A condition in which cancer is spread widely throughout the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104704
Concept ID:
C0205699
Neoplastic Process
18.

Cribriform carcinoma

A carcinoma characterized by the presence of a cribriform architectural pattern. Representative examples include the intraductal cribriform breast carcinoma and invasive cribriform breast carcinoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104694
Concept ID:
C0205643
Neoplastic Process
19.

Mutagenesis Process

Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
86969
Concept ID:
C0079866
Molecular Function
20.

Clear cell adenocarcinoma

An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of varying combinations of clear and hobnail-shaped tumor cells. There are three predominant patterns described as tubulocystic, solid, and papillary. These tumors, usually located in the female reproductive organs, have been seen more frequently in young women since 1970 as a result of the association with intrauterine exposure to diethylstilbestrol. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
64629
Concept ID:
C0206681
Neoplastic Process

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