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Results: 1 to 20 of 24

1.

Sarcoma

Your soft tissues connect, support, or surround other tissues. Examples include your muscles, tendons, fat, and blood vessels. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of these soft tissues. There are many kinds, based on the type of tissue they started in. They may cause a lump or swelling in the soft tissue. Sometimes they spread and can press on nerves and organs, causing problems such as pain or trouble breathing. No one knows exactly what causes these cancers. They are not common, but you have a higher risk if you have been exposed to certain chemicals, have had radiation therapy, or have certain genetic diseases. Doctors diagnose soft tissue sarcomas with a biopsy. Treatments include surgery to remove the tumor, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
224714
Concept ID:
C1261473
Neoplastic Process
2.

Ewing's sarcoma

A malignant tumor of the bone which always arises in the medullary tissue, occurring more often in cylindrical bones. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506718
Concept ID:
CN168774
Finding
3.

Sarcoma

The presence of a `sarcoma` (MPATH:551). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506452
Concept ID:
CN117138
Finding
4.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449782

5.

Ewing's sarcoma

Ewing sarcoma is a cancerous tumor that occurs in bones or soft tissues, such as cartilage or nerves. There are several types of Ewing sarcoma, including Ewing sarcoma of bone, extraosseous Ewing sarcoma, peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET), and Askin tumor. These tumors are considered to be related because they have similar genetic causes. These types of Ewing sarcoma can be distinguished from one another by the tissue in which the tumor develops. Approximately 87 percent of Ewing sarcomas are Ewing sarcoma of bone, which is a bone tumor that usually occurs in the thigh bones (femurs), pelvis, ribs, or shoulder blades. Extraosseous (or extraskeletal) Ewing sarcoma describes tumors in the soft tissues around bones, such as cartilage. pPNETs occur in nerve tissue and can be found in many parts of the body. A type of pPNET found in the chest is called Askin tumor. Ewing sarcomas most often occur in children and young adults. Affected individuals usually feel stiffness, pain, swelling, or tenderness of the bone or surrounding tissue. Sometimes, there is a lump near the surface of the skin that feels warm and soft to the touch. Often, children have a fever that does not go away. Ewing sarcoma of bone can cause weakening of the involved bone, and affected individuals may have a broken bone with no obvious cause. It is common for Ewing sarcoma to spread to other parts of the body (metastasize), usually to the lungs, to other bones, or to the bone marrow.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
107816
Concept ID:
C0553580
Neoplastic Process
6.

Cysteamine

A radiation-protective agent that oxidizes in air to form CYSTAMINE. It can be given intravenously or orally to treat radiation sickness. The bitartrate has been used for the oral treatment of nephropathic cystinosis. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
41390
Concept ID:
C0010648
Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
8.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Neoplasms, Bone Tissue

Neoplasms composed of bony tissue, whether normal or of a soft tissue which has become ossified. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in bones. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
104905
Concept ID:
C0206639
Neoplastic Process
10.

Epithelioid sarcoma

An aggressive malignant neoplasm of uncertain lineage, characterized by the presence of epithelioid cells forming nodular patterns. The nodules often undergo central necrosis, resulting in a pseudogranulomatous growth pattern. It usually occurs in young adults. The most common sites of involvement are the extremities (distal-type epithelioid sarcoma), and less frequently the pelvis, perineum, and genital organs (proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104753
Concept ID:
C0205944
Neoplastic Process
11.

Connective and Soft Tissue Neoplasm

Neoplasms developing from some structure of the connective and subcutaneous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective or soft tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
60224
Concept ID:
C0206765
Neoplastic Process
12.

Neoplasm of connective tissues

Neoplasms composed of connective tissue, including elastic, mucous, reticular, osseous, and cartilaginous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45035
Concept ID:
C0027656
Neoplastic Process
13.

Pathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms

Abnormal anatomical or physiological conditions and objective or subjective manifestations of disease, not classified as disease or syndrome. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21047
Concept ID:
C0039058
Sign or Symptom
14.

Pathologic Processes

The abnormal mechanisms and forms involved in the dysfunctions of tissues and organs. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18325
Concept ID:
C0030660
Pathologic Function
15.

Malignant neoplastic disease

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
16.

Osteosarcoma

A malignant neoplasm usually arising from bone. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10501
Concept ID:
C0029463
Neoplastic Process
17.

Neoplasms by Histologic Type

A collective term for the various histological types of NEOPLASMS. It is more likely to be used by searchers than by indexers and catalogers. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10295
Concept ID:
C0027652
Neoplastic Process
18.

Neoplasm

A general term for autonomous tissue growth in which the malignancy status has not been established and for which the transformed cell type has not been specifically identified. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10294
Concept ID:
C0027651
Neoplastic Process
19.

Cysteamine Tartrate (1:1)

MedGen UID:
210320
Concept ID:
C0887461
Pharmacologic Substance
20.

Cysteamine Maleate (1:1)

MedGen UID:
168327
Concept ID:
C0887465
Pharmacologic Substance

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