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Results: 1 to 20 of 65

1.

Lymphoproliferative Disorders

A disease in which cells of the lymphatic system grow excessively. Lymphoproliferative disorders are often treated like cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
6162
Concept ID:
C0024314
Neoplastic Process
2.

Heavy Chain Disease

A disorder of immunoglobulin synthesis in which large quantities of abnormal heavy chains are excreted in the urine. The amino acid sequences of the N-(amino-) terminal regions of these chains are normal, but they have a deletion extending from part of the variable domain through the first domain of the constant region, so that they cannot form cross-links to the light chains. The defect arises through faulty coupling of the variable (V) and constant (C) region genes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5469
Concept ID:
C0018852
Neoplastic Process
3.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
4.

disease

MedGen UID:
798428
Concept ID:
CN204926
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Lymphoproliferative disorder

MedGen UID:
505822
Concept ID:
CN004892
Finding
6.

Gamma heavy chain disease (clinical)

A clonal disorder characterized by the secretion of a truncated gamma chain. In most cases, it is associated with morphologic changes also seen in lymphoplasmacytic lymphomas, but the clinical course is typically more aggressive than in lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. --2004 [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
42374
Concept ID:
C0018854
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymphatic system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is called Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphoma. . Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors can't determine why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. . Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as : -Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin. -Unexplained weight loss . -Fever . -Soaking night sweats . -Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain . -Weakness and tiredness that don't go away . -Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen . Your doctor will perform an exam and lab tests to determine if you have lymphoma. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44223
Concept ID:
C0024299
Neoplastic Process
8.

Neoplasm

A general term for autonomous tissue growth in which the malignancy status has not been established and for which the transformed cell type has not been specifically identified. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10294
Concept ID:
C0027651
Neoplastic Process
9.

Female

A person who belongs to the sex that normally produces ova. The term is used to indicate biological sex distinctions, or cultural gender role distinctions, or both. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8807
Concept ID:
C0015780
Finding
10.

Autoimmunity

The occurrence of an immune reaction against the organism's own cells or tissues. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505423
Concept ID:
CN002679
Finding
11.

Lymphoma

A cancer originating in lymphocytes and presenting as a solid tumor of lymhpoid cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505322
Concept ID:
CN002422
Finding
12.

Malignant lymphoma - lymphoplasmacytic

A malignant neoplasm composed of lymphocytes (B-cells), lymphoplasmacytoid cells, and plasma cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
473052
Concept ID:
C0334633
Neoplastic Process
13.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
447640

14.

Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

A clonal neoplasm of small B-lymphocytes, lymphoplasmacytoid cells, and plasma cells involving the bone marrow, lymph nodes, and the spleen. The majority of patients have a serum IgM paraprotein. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
438046
Concept ID:
C2700641
Neoplastic Process
15.

Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia

Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) is a malignant B-cell neoplasm characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the bone marrow and hypersecretion of monoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) protein (review by Vijay and Gertz, 2007). The importance of genetic factors is suggested by the observation of familial clustering of WM (McMaster, 2003). Whereas WM is rare, an asymptomatic elevation of monoclonal IgM protein, termed 'IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance' (IgM MGUS) is more common. Patients with IgM MGUS can progress to develop WM, at the rate of 1.5% to 2% per year (Kyle et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia One locus for susceptibility to Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM1) maps to chromosome 6p21.3. Another locus (WM2; 610430) maps to chromosome 4q. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
320546
Concept ID:
C1835192
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Rare Diseases

A rare disease is one that affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. There are nearly 7,000 rare diseases. More than 25 million Americans have one. Rare diseases: -May involve chronic illness, disability, and often premature death. -Often have no treatment or not very effective treatment. -Are frequently not diagnosed correctly. -Are often very complex. -Are often caused by changes in genes. It can be hard to find a specialist who knows how to treat your rare disease. Disease advocacy groups, rare disease organizations, and genetics clinics may help you to find one. NIH: National Institutes of Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
146261
Concept ID:
C0678236
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Autoimmune reaction

A specific humoral or cell-mediated immune response against autologous (self) antigens. An autoimmune process may produce or be caused by autoimmune disease and may be developmentally complex, not necessarily pathological, and possibly pervasive. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
105217
Concept ID:
C0443146
Pathologic Function
18.

Immunoglobulins

there are two types of polypeptide chains responsible for the biological and immunological properties of the different immunoglobulins, the heavy chain and the light chain; they are linked by covalent and non-covalent forces to give a four-chain Y-shaped structure based on pairs of identical heavy and light chains; each chain consists of a variable region and a constant region which are coded for by different genes; some immunoglobulin classes occur as polymers of this basic monomer. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
43841
Concept ID:
C0021027
Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma associated with bone marrow involvement and IgM monoclonal gammopathy. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
6174
Concept ID:
C0024419
Neoplastic Process
20.

Autoimmune disease

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body. No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling. The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2135
Concept ID:
C0004364
Disease or Syndrome

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