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Results: 1 to 20 of 55

1.

Complication Aspects

Used with diseases to indicate conditions that co-exist or follow, i.e., co-existing diseases, complications, or sequelae. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
223946
Concept ID:
C1171258
Pathologic Function
2.

Congestive heart failure

Heart failure accompanied by EDEMA, such as swelling of the legs and ankles and congestion in the lungs. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9169
Concept ID:
C0018802
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Heart failure

A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6749
Concept ID:
C0018801
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Endocarditis

Endocarditis is an inflammation of your heart's inner lining. The most common type, bacterial endocarditis, occurs when germs enter your heart. These germs come through your bloodstream from another part of your body, often your mouth. Bacterial endocarditis can damage your heart valves. If untreated, it can be life-threatening. It is rare in healthy hearts. . Risk factors include having: - An abnormal or damaged heart valve . - A severe case of mitral valve prolapse . - An artificial heart valve . - Certain heart defects . If you have a high risk of bacterial endocarditis, your doctor might prescribe antibiotics before dental work and certain types of surgery. Early treatment can help you avoid complications. Symptoms you might notice include fever, shortness of breath, fluid buildup in your arms or legs, tiny red spots on your skin and weight loss. Treatment usually involves high-dose antibiotics.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4940
Concept ID:
C0014118
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Absence

MedGen UID:
739164
Concept ID:
C1689985
Anatomical Abnormality
7.

Acquired stenosis

MedGen UID:
507599
Concept ID:
C0009814
Pathologic Function
8.

Pulmonic stenosis

A narrowing of the right ventricular outflow tract that can occur at the pulmonary valve (valvular stenosis) or just below the pulmonary valve (infundibular stenosis). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504885
Concept ID:
CN001495
Finding
9.

Congestive heart failure

The presence of an abnormality of cardiac function that is responsible for the failure of the heart to pump blood at a rate that is commensurate with the needs of the tissues or a state in which abnormally elevated filling pressures are required for the heart to do so. Heart failure is frequently related to a defect in myocardial contraction. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504881
Concept ID:
CN001488
Finding
10.

Congenital heart defects

MedGen UID:
490004
Concept ID:
CN169364
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Malformation of the heart and great vessels

Congenital malformation of the heart or great vessels (i.e., the large blood vesslesentering and leaving the heart: aorta, the pulmonary arteries and veins, and the superior and inferior vena cava). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428300
Concept ID:
CN002327
Finding
12.

Regurgitation

Flow in the opposite direction from normal, as the casting up of undigested food or gas from the stomach, or the backward flowing of blood into the heart, or between the chambers of the heart when a valve is incompetent. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389155
Concept ID:
C2004489
Sign or Symptom
13.

Calcinosis

Deposits of calcium in the tissues. Calcification in the breast can be seen on a mammogram, but cannot be detected by touch. There are two types of breast calcification, macrocalcification and microcalcification. Macrocalcifications are large deposits and are usually not related to cancer. Microcalcifications are specks of calcium that may be found in an area of rapidly dividing cells. Many microcalcifications clustered together may be a sign of cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
288557
Concept ID:
C1533591
Finding
14.

Stricture

Narrowing or stricture of a duct or canal. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
224710
Concept ID:
C1261287
Pathologic Function
15.

Severe

A term used to describe cells that look abnormal under a microscope. These cells are more likely to grow and spread quickly than cells in low-grade cancer or in growths that may become cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
16.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Congenital heart disease

Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a group of serious heart defects that are present from birth. These abnormalities result from problems with the formation of one or more parts of the heart during the early stages of embryonic development. CCHD prevents the heart from pumping blood effectively or reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood. As a result, organs and tissues throughout the body do not receive enough oxygen, which can lead to organ damage and life-threatening complications. Individuals with CCHD usually require surgery soon after birth. Although babies with CCHD may appear healthy for the first few hours or days of life, signs and symptoms soon become apparent. These can include an abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur), rapid breathing (tachypnea), low blood pressure (hypotension), low levels of oxygen in the blood (hypoxemia), and a blue or purple tint to the skin caused by a shortage of oxygen (cyanosis). If untreated, CCHD can lead to shock, coma, and death. However, most people with CCHD now survive past infancy due to improvements in early detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Some people with treated CCHD have few related health problems later in life. However, long-term effects of CCHD can include delayed development and reduced stamina during exercise. Adults with these heart defects have an increased risk of abnormal heart rhythms, heart failure, sudden cardiac arrest, stroke, and premature death. Each of the heart defects associated with CCHD affects the flow of blood into, out of, or through the heart. Some of the heart defects involve structures within the heart itself, such as the two lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles) or the valves that control blood flow through the heart. Others affect the structure of the large blood vessels leading into and out of the heart (including the aorta and pulmonary artery). Still others involve a combination of these structural abnormalities. People with CCHD have one or more specific heart defects. The heart defects classified as CCHD include coarctation of the aorta, double-outlet right ventricle, D-transposition of the great arteries, Ebstein anomaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, interrupted aortic arch, pulmonary atresia with intact septum, single ventricle, total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, tetralogy of Fallot, tricuspid atresia, and truncus arteriosus.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
57501
Concept ID:
C0152021
Congenital Abnormality
18.

Pulmonic valve stenosis

narrowing of the opening between the pulmonary artery and the right ventricle. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
18768
Concept ID:
C0034089
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Heart disease

Any deviation from the normal structure or function of the cardiac system that is manifested by a characteristic set of symptoms and signs. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
5458
Concept ID:
C0018799
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Biochemical Processes

Chemical reactions or functions, enzymatic activities, and metabolic pathways of living things. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
267723
Concept ID:
C1511130
Molecular Function

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