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Items: 12

1.

Retinitis pigmentosa 2

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders in which abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the retina lead to progressive visual loss. Affected individuals first experience defective dark adaptation or "night blindness," followed by constriction of peripheral visual fields and, eventually, loss of central vision late in the course of the disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
394544
Concept ID:
C2681923
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Adolescent nephronophthisis

Nephronophthisis is a disorder that affects the kidneys. It is characterized by inflammation and scarring (fibrosis) that impairs kidney function. These abnormalities lead to increased urine production (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), general weakness, and extreme tiredness (fatigue). In addition, affected individuals develop fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys, usually in an area known as the corticomedullary region. Another feature of nephronophthisis is a shortage of red blood cells, a condition known as anemia. Nephronophthisis eventually leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a life-threatening failure of kidney function that occurs when the kidneys are no longer able to filter fluids and waste products from the body effectively. Nephronophthisis can be classified by the approximate age at which ESRD begins: around age 1 (infantile), around age 13 (juvenile), and around age 19 (adolescent). About 85 percent of all cases of nephronophthisis are isolated, which means they occur without other signs and symptoms. Some people with nephronophthisis have additional features, which can include liver fibrosis, heart abnormalities, or mirror image reversal of the position of one or more organs inside the body (situs inversus). Nephronophthisis can occur as part of separate syndromes that affect other areas of the body; these are often referred to as nephronophthisis-associated ciliopathies. For example, Senior-Løken syndrome is characterized by the combination of nephronophthisis and a breakdown of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (retinal degeneration); Joubert syndrome affects many parts of the body, causing neurological problems and other features, which can include nephronophthisis.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
346809
Concept ID:
C1858392
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Retinitis pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders in which abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the retina lead to progressive visual loss. Affected individuals first experience defective dark adaptation or "night blindness," followed by constriction of peripheral visual fields and, eventually, loss of central vision late in the course of the disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
20551
Concept ID:
C0035334
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Neural tube defect

Neural tube defects are the second most common type of birth defect after congenital heart defects. The 2 most common NTDs are open spina bifida, also known as spina bifida cystica (SBC) or myelomeningocele, and anencephaly (206500) (Detrait et al., 2005). Spina bifida occulta (SBO), a bony defect of the spine covered by normal skin, is a mild form of spina bifida that is often asymptomatic. The term 'spinal dysraphia' refers to both SBC and SBO (Botto et al., 1999; Fineman et al., 1982). The most severe neural tube defect, craniorachischisis (CRN), leaves the neural tube open from the midbrain or rostral hindbrain to the base of the spine (summary by Robinson et al., 2012). Neural tube defects represent a complex trait with multifactorial etiology encompassing both genetic and environmental components (summary by Bartsch et al., 2012 and Lei et al., 2014). An X-linked form of spina bifida has been suggested; see 301410. See also folate-sensitive neural tube defects (601634), which are caused by genes involved in folate metabolism. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
18009
Concept ID:
C0027794
Finding
5.

Ciliopathy

MedGen UID:
852061
Concept ID:
CN234683
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Renal cyst

A cyst is a fluid-filled sac. There are two types of kidney cysts. . Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) runs in families. In PKD, the cysts take the place of the normal tissue. They enlarge the kidneys and make them work poorly, leading to kidney failure. When PKD causes kidneys to fail - which usually happens after many years - people need dialysis or kidney transplantation. About half of people with the most common type of PKD end up with kidney failure. PKD also causes cysts in other parts of the body, such as the liver. . Symptoms of PKD include. -Pain in the back and lower sides. -Headaches. -Urinary tract infections. -Blood in the urine. Doctors diagnose PKD with imaging tests and family history. Treatments include medications, and, when people with PKD develop kidney failure, dialysis or kidney transplants. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) usually happens in people who are on dialysis. Unlike PKD, the kidneys are normal sized, and cysts do not form in other parts of the body. People with ACKD already have chronic kidney disease when they develop cysts. ACKD often has no symptoms. In most cases, the cysts are harmless and do not need treatment. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
776573
Concept ID:
C2173677
Finding
7.

Retinal degeneration

A deterioration of the retina. This nonspecific term is retained here because of its wide use in the literature, but if possible new annotations should indicate the precise type of retinal abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504488
Concept ID:
CN000512
Finding
8.

Rod-cone dystrophy

Progressive rod photoreceptor dysfunction and loss that leads to night blindness and loss of peripheral visual field, either as the prevailing problem or occurring at least as severely as cone dysfunction. Occurs most often as retinitis pigmentosa (Hereditary degeneration and atrophy of the retina). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504473
Concept ID:
CN000477
Finding
9.

Cone-rod dystrophy 3

MedGen UID:
349030
Concept ID:
C1858806
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Cystic retinal degeneration

MedGen UID:
374208
Concept ID:
C1839362
Finding
11.

Retinitis Pigmentosa 22

MedGen UID:
355384
Concept ID:
C1865140
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Joubert syndrome 3

Classic Joubert syndrome is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS) . Hypotonia. Developmental delays . Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. The designation Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) is used to describe individuals with JS who have additional findings including retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
332931
Concept ID:
C1837713
Disease or Syndrome
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