Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Results: 1 to 20 of 41

1.

Male gender

A person who belongs to the sex that normally produces sperm. The term is used to indicate biological sex distinctions, cultural gender role distinctions, or both. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7446
Concept ID:
C0024554
Finding
2.

Malignant Neoplasm

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
3.

Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

A germ cell tumor arising from the testis. Representative examples include teratoma, seminoma, embryonal carcinoma, and yolk sac tumor. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
277809
Concept ID:
C1336708
Neoplastic Process
4.

Malignant tumor of testis

Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) affect 1 in 500 men and are the most common cancer in males aged 15 to 40 in western European populations. The incidence of TGCT rose dramatically during the 20th century. Known risk factors for TGCT include a history of undescended testis (UDT), testicular dysgenesis, infertility, previously diagnosed TGCT, and a family history of the disease. Brothers of men with TGCT have an 8- to 10-fold risk of developing TGCT, whereas the relative risk to fathers and sons is 4-fold. This familial relative risk is much higher than that for most other types of cancer (summary by Rapley et al., 2000). Genetic Heterogeneity of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors A locus for testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT1; 300228) has been identified on chromosome Xq27. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
56313
Concept ID:
C0153594
Neoplastic Process
5.

Diffuse Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath

Outgrowths of synovial membrane composed of villi and fibrous nodules characterized histologically by hemosiderin- and lipid-containing macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. It usually occurs in the knee. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
11691
Concept ID:
C0039106
Neoplastic Process
6.

Male Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the male URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318601
Concept ID:
C1720894
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Epithelial Neoplasm

neoplasm of epithelial origin, ranging from benign (adenoma and papilloma) to malignant (carcinoma). [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
277963
Concept ID:
C1368683
Neoplastic Process
8.

Cancer, Embryonal

MedGen UID:
199639
Concept ID:
C0751364
Neoplastic Process
9.

Intraepithelial Neoplasia

A precancerous neoplastic process that affects the squamous, glandular, or transitional cell epithelium without evidence of invasion. According to the degree of nuclear atypia, number of mitotic figures, and presence of architectural distortion, it is classified as low grade (mild dysplasia) or high grade (moderate or severe dysplasia). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
164203
Concept ID:
C0878500
Neoplastic Process
10.

Carcinomatosis

A condition in which cancer is spread widely throughout the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104704
Concept ID:
C0205699
Neoplastic Process
11.

Germinoma

A malignant germ cell tumor arising in the central nervous system. It is characterized by the presence of primitive, large malignant germ cells and lymphocytes. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
64626
Concept ID:
C0206660
Neoplastic Process
12.

Undifferentiated Carcinoma

A usually aggressive malignant epithelial neoplasm composed of atypical cells which do not display evidence of glandular, squamous, or transitional cell differentiation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
60010
Concept ID:
C0205698
Neoplastic Process
13.

Sarcomatoid Carcinoma

A malignant epithelial neoplasm characterized by the presence of spindle cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
60009
Concept ID:
C0205697
Neoplastic Process
14.

Carcinoma, anaplastic

MedGen UID:
60008
Concept ID:
C0205696
Neoplastic Process
15.

Testicular Neoplasm

A benign or malignant neoplasm that affects the testis. Representative examples include fibroma, thecoma, benign Sertoli cell tumor, seminoma, embryonal carcinoma, sarcoma, leukemia, and lymphoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
52675
Concept ID:
C0039590
Neoplastic Process
16.

Embryonal Neoplasm

new abnormal embryonic tissue that grows by excessive cellular division and proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
45034
Concept ID:
C0027654
Neoplastic Process
17.

Male Reproductive System Neoplasm

Tumor or cancer of the MALE GENITALIA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42196
Concept ID:
C0017417
Neoplastic Process
18.

Disorder of male genital organ

Pathological processes involving the male reproductive tract (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42195
Concept ID:
C0017412
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Genitourinary neoplasm

Tumors or cancer of the UROGENITAL SYSTEM in either the male or the female. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
20.

Disorder of testis

Testicles, or testes, make male hormones and sperm. They are two egg-shaped organs inside the scrotum, the loose sac of skin behind the penis. It's easy to injure your testicles because they are not protected by bones or muscles. Men and boys should wear athletic supporters when they play sports. . You should examine your testicles monthly and seek medical attention for lumps, redness, pain or other changes. Testicles can get inflamed or infected. They can also develop cancer. Testicular cancer is rare and highly treatable. It usually happens between the ages of 15 and 40.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
11743
Concept ID:
C0039584
Disease or Syndrome

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...