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1.

Cocaine

Cocaine is a white powder. It can be snorted up the nose or mixed with water and injected with a needle. Cocaine can also be made into small white rocks, called crack. Crack is smoked in a small glass pipe. Cocaine speeds up your whole body. You may feel full of energy, happy, and excited. But then your mood can change. You can become angry, nervous, and afraid that someone's out to get you. You might do things that make no sense. After the high of the cocaine wears off, you can crash and feel tired and sad for days. You also get a strong craving to take the drug again to try to feel better. No matter how cocaine is taken, it is dangerous. Some of the most common serious problems include heart attack and stroke. You are also at risk for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis, from sharing needles or having unsafe sex. Cocaine is more dangerous when combined with other drugs or alcohol. It is easy to lose control over cocaine use and become addicted. Then, even if you get treatment, it can be hard to stay off the drug. People who stopped using cocaine can still feel strong cravings for the drug, sometimes even years later. NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3135
Concept ID:
C0009170
Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Opioid Receptor Agonist

Any agent that binds to and activates any of the opioid receptor subtypes. Opioid receptor agonists mimic the actions of endogenous opioid peptides. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
760844
Concept ID:
C3537230
Pharmacologic Substance
3.

Agonist

A drug or substance that binds to a receptor inside a cell or on its surface and causes the same action as the substance that normally binds to the receptor. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
459858
Concept ID:
C2987634
Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Opioid Agonist [EPC]

MedGen UID:
365319
Concept ID:
C1883695
Pharmacologic Substance
5.

agonists

Used with chemicals, drugs, and endogenous substances to indicate substances or agents that have affinity for a receptor and intrinsic activity at that receptor. (From Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p.16) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
116746
Concept ID:
C0243192
Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Opiate agonist

A substance used to treat moderate to severe pain. Opioids are like opiates, such as morphine and codeine, but are not made from opium. Opioids bind to opioid receptors in the central nervous system. An opioid is a type of alkaloid. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
66892
Concept ID:
C0242402
Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Victim of abuse finding

Indication of abuse victim.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
646740
Concept ID:
C0562381
Finding
8.

Addiction

The observable, measurable, and often pathological activity of an organism that portrays its inability to overcome a habit resulting in an insatiable craving for a substance or for performing certain acts. The addictive behavior includes the emotional and physical overdependence on the object of habit in increasing amount or frequency. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
88373
Concept ID:
C0085281
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
9.

Stress

Everyone feels stressed from time to time. Not all stress is bad. All animals have a stress response, and it can be life-saving. But chronic stress can cause both physical and mental harm. There are at least three different types of stress:: -Routine stress related to the pressures of work, family, and other daily responsibilities. -Stress brought about by a sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness. -Traumatic stress, which happens when you are in danger of being seriously hurt or killed. Examples include a major accident, war, assault, or a natural disaster. This type of stress can cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Different people may feel stress in different ways. Some people experience digestive symptoms. Others may have headaches, sleeplessness, depressed mood, anger, and irritability. People under chronic stress get more frequent and severe viral infections, such as the flu or common cold. Vaccines, such as the flu shot, are less effective for them. Some people cope with stress more effectively than others. It's important to know your limits when it comes to stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20971
Concept ID:
C0038435
Finding
10.

Topical anesthetic

Anesthetic applied on a specific site of body. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
452114
Concept ID:
C0040464
Pharmacologic Substance
11.

Murine

MedGen UID:
108834
Concept ID:
C0591833
Pharmacologic Substance
12.

Sensory System Agents

Drugs that act on neuronal sensory receptors resulting in an increase, decrease, or modification of afferent nerve activity. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p367) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
67054
Concept ID:
C0243058
Pharmacologic Substance
13.

Peripheral Nervous System Agents

Drugs that act principally at one or more sites within the peripheral neuroeffector systems, the autonomic system, and motor nerve-skeletal system. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p75) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
67048
Concept ID:
C0243049
Pharmacologic Substance
14.

U-50488

MedGen UID:
55871
Concept ID:
C0147448
Pharmacologic Substance
15.

Alkaloid

A member of a large group of substances found in plants and in some fungi. Alkaloids contain nitrogen and can be made in the laboratory. Nicotine, caffeine, codeine, and vincristine are alkaloids. Some alkaloids, such as vincristine, are used to treat cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7968
Concept ID:
C0002062
Pharmacologic Substance
16.

Central Nervous System Depressants

loosely defined group of drugs that tend to reduce the activity of the central nervous system. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
3305
Concept ID:
C0007681
Pharmacologic Substance
17.

Local Anesthetics

drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations; they act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber; their action is completely reversible. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
1537
Concept ID:
C0002934
Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Anesthetics

A drug or other substance that causes a loss of feeling or awareness. Local anesthetics cause a loss of feeling in one small area of the body. Regional anesthetics cause a loss of feeling in a part of the body, such as an arm or leg. General anesthetics cause a loss of feeling and a complete loss of awareness that feels like a very deep sleep. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
1535
Concept ID:
C0002932
Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Central Nervous System Agents

A class of drugs producing both physiological and psychological effects through a variety of mechanisms. They can be divided into "specific" agents, e.g., affecting an identifiable molecular mechanism unique to target cells bearing receptors for that agent, and "nonspecific" agents, those producing effects on different target cells and acting by diverse molecular mechanisms. Those with nonspecific mechanisms are generally further classed according to whether they produce behavioral depression or stimulation. Those with specific mechanisms are classed by locus of action or specific therapeutic use. (From Gilman AG, et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p252) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
836
Concept ID:
C0007680
Pharmacologic Substance
20.

3,4-Dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl)-benzeneacetamide, (trans)-(-)-Isomer

MedGen UID:
215392
Concept ID:
C0949568
Pharmacologic Substance

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