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Results: 1 to 20 of 42

1.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
2.

Ribavirin

A synthetic nucleoside analog of ribofuranose with activity against hepatitis C virus and other RNA viruses. Ribavirin is incorporated into viral RNA, thereby inhibiting viral RNA synthesis, inducing viral genome mutations, and inhibiting normal viral replication. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
48459
Concept ID:
C0035525
Pharmacologic Substance
3.

Infection

Unknown contamination with disease-producing germs. [from HHCC]

MedGen UID:
43874
Concept ID:
C0021311
Disease or Syndrome
4.

ribavirin

MedGen UID:
776492
Concept ID:
CN184126
Pharmacologic Substance
5.

Resistance to hepatitis C virus

MedGen UID:
332112
Concept ID:
C1836031
Finding
6.

Chronic

A disease or condition that persists or progresses over a long period of time. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
104657
Concept ID:
C0205191
7.

Protease Inhibitor

A compound that interferes with the ability of certain enzymes to break down proteins. Some protease inhibitors can keep a virus from making copies of itself (for example, AIDS virus protease inhibitors), and some can prevent cancer cells from spreading. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
18701
Concept ID:
C0033607
Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is one type of hepatitis - a liver disease - caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with infected blood. It can also spread through sex with an infected person and from mother to baby during childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. A blood test can tell if you have it. Usually, hepatitis C does not get better by itself. The infection can last a lifetime and may lead to scarring of the liver or liver cancer. Medicines sometimes help, but side effects can be a problem. Serious cases may need a liver transplant. There is no vaccine for HCV. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
42425
Concept ID:
C0019196
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Inflammatory disease of liver

Your liver helps your body digest food, store energy and remove poisons. Hepatitis is a swelling of the liver that makes it stop working well. It can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to cancer. Viruses cause most cases of hepatitis. The type of hepatitis is named for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Drug or alcohol use can also lead to hepatitis. In other cases, your body mistakenly attacks its own tissues. You can help prevent some viral forms by getting a vaccine. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have: -Loss of appetite. -Nausea and vomiting. -Diarrhea. -Dark-colored urine and pale bowel movements. -Stomach pain. -Jaundice, yellowing of skin and eyes.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5515
Concept ID:
C0019158
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Hepatitis

Inflammation of the liver. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506667
Concept ID:
CN167841
Finding
11.

Cutaneous photosensitivity

An increased sensitivity of the skin to light. Photosensitivity may result in a rash upon exposure to the sun (which is known as photodermatosis). Photosensitivity can be diagnosed by phototests in which light is shone on small areas of skin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428240
Concept ID:
CN000929
Finding
12.

Mild

The second level of severity in an ordered list based on a five-level scale of minimal, mild, moderate, marked, and severe. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
422477
Concept ID:
C2945599
13.

Photoparoxysmal response 1

MedGen UID:
358382
Concept ID:
C1868677
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Noonan syndrome 3

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, characteristic facies, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one third of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
349931
Concept ID:
C1860991
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Disease Response

The pathologic and/or clinical changes that result from treatment. The changes may include eradication of detectable disease, stabilization of disease, or disease progression. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
309976
Concept ID:
C1704632
Finding
16.

Discontinued

To stop or end, permanently or temporarily. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
303183
Concept ID:
C1444662
Finding
17.

Severe

A term used to describe cells that look abnormal under a microscope. These cells are more likely to grow and spread quickly than cells in low-grade cancer or in growths that may become cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
18.

Photogenic epilepsy

The photoparoxysmal response (PPR), also referred to as photosensitivity, is defined as the abnormal occurrence of cortical spikes or spike and wave discharges on electroencephalogram (EEG) in response to intermittent light stimulation (Doose and Waltz, 1993). Photosensitivity is a frequent finding in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (see 600669), especially those with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, suggesting a common epileptogenic pathway for both phenomena. The comorbidity of the 2 disorders suggests that presence of PPR may also increase the risk for epilepsy (Stephani et al., 2004; Tauer et al., 2005). Genetic Heterogeneity of Photoparoxysmal Response The PPR1 locus has been mapped to chromosome 6p21. See also PPR2 (609572), mapped to chromosome 13q31, and PPR3 (609573), mapped to chromosome 7q32. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
98285
Concept ID:
C0393720
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Photosensitivity

increased sensitivity of the skin to light and other sources of UV [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
87601
Concept ID:
C0349506
Finding
20.

Virazole

MedGen UID:
301227
Concept ID:
C1622085
Pharmacologic Substance

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