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Results: 1 to 20 of 24

1.

Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by dementia that typically begins with subtle and poorly recognized failure of memory and slowly becomes more severe and, eventually, incapacitating. Other common findings include confusion, poor judgment, language disturbance, agitation, withdrawal, and hallucinations. Occasionally, seizures, Parkinsonian features, increased muscle tone, myoclonus, incontinence, and mutism occur. Death usually results from general inanition, malnutrition, and pneumonia. The typical clinical duration of the disease is eight to ten years, with a range from one to 25 years. Approximately 25% of all AD is familial (i.e., =2 persons in a family have AD) of which approximately 95% is late onset (age >60-65 years) and 5% is early onset (age <65 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1853
Concept ID:
C0002395
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Alzheimer disease

A degenerative disease of the brain characterized by the insidious onset of dementia. Impairment of memory, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe apraxia and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuropil threads. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505259
Concept ID:
CN002282
Finding
3.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
4.

disease

An alteration of health status resulting from a physiopathological mechanism, and having a homogeneous clinical presentation and evolution and homogeneous therapeutic possibilities. Excludes developmental anomalies. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
798428
Concept ID:
CN204926
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
6.

Late onset

A type of adult onset with onset of symptoms after the age of 60 years. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427965
Concept ID:
CN003237
Finding
7.

Alzheimer disease, type 2

Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain that causes dementia, which is a gradual loss of memory, judgment, and ability to function. This disorder usually appears in people older than age 65, but less common forms of the disease appear earlier in adulthood. Memory loss is the most common sign of Alzheimer disease. Forgetfulness may be subtle at first, but the loss of memory worsens over time until it interferes with most aspects of daily living. Even in familiar settings, a person with Alzheimer disease may get lost or become confused. Routine tasks such as preparing meals, doing laundry, and performing other household chores can be challenging. Additionally, it may become difficult to recognize people and name objects. Affected people increasingly require help with dressing, eating, and personal care. As the disorder progresses, some people with Alzheimer disease experience personality and behavioral changes and have trouble interacting in a socially appropriate manner. Other common symptoms include agitation, restlessness, withdrawal, and loss of language skills. People with this disease usually require total care during the advanced stages of the disease. Affected individuals usually survive 8 to 10 years after the appearance of symptoms, but the course of the disease can range from 1 to 25 years. Death usually results from pneumonia, malnutrition, or general body wasting (inanition). Alzheimer disease can be classified as early-onset or late-onset. The signs and symptoms of the early-onset form appear before age 65, while the late-onset form appears after age 65. The early-onset form is much less common than the late-onset form, accounting for less than 5 percent of all cases of Alzheimer disease.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
400197
Concept ID:
C1863051
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Onset

The start, beginning, or early stages. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87142
Concept ID:
C0332162
9.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Tauopathies

Neurodegenerative disorders involving deposition of abnormal tau protein isoforms (TAU PROTEINS) in neurons and glial cells in the brain. Pathological aggregations of tau proteins are associated with mutation of the tau gene on chromosome 17 in patients with ALZHEIMER DISEASE; DEMENTIA; PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS; progressive supranuclear palsy (SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE); and corticobasal degeneration. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181880
Concept ID:
C0949664
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Diagnosis, Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
138165
Concept ID:
C0376338
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
12.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
13.

Neurodegenerative Disorders

Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Hunter syndrome, or sensory motor neuropathies, such as Friedreich ataxia and Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. [from LNC]

MedGen UID:
101195
Concept ID:
C0524851
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Dementia

Dementia is the name for a group of symptoms caused by disorders that affect the brain. It is not a specific disease. People with dementia may not be able to think well enough to do normal activities, such as getting dressed or eating. They may lose their ability to solve problems or control their emotions. Their personalities may change. They may become agitated or see things that are not there. . Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have dementia. People with dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very elderly people, it is not part of normal aging. Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Drugs are available to treat some of these diseases. While these drugs cannot cure dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve symptoms or slow down the disease. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
99229
Concept ID:
C0497327
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Pathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms

Abnormal anatomical or physiological conditions and objective or subjective manifestations of disease, not classified as disease or syndrome. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21047
Concept ID:
C0039058
Sign or Symptom
16.

Psychoses, Traumatic

MedGen UID:
19557
Concept ID:
C0033943
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
17.

Pathologic Processes

The abnormal mechanisms and forms involved in the dysfunctions of tissues and organs. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18325
Concept ID:
C0030660
Pathologic Function
18.

Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders

Cognitive disorders including delirium, dementia, and other cognitive disorders. These may be the result of substance use, trauma, or other causes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14510
Concept ID:
C0029227
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
19.

Disorder of nervous system

The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can have trouble moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing, or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses, or mood. There are more than 600 neurologic diseases. Major types include: - Diseases caused by faulty genes, such as Huntington's disease and muscular dystrophy. - Problems with the way the nervous system develops, such as spina bifida. - Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are damaged or die, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. - Diseases of the blood vessels that supply the brain, such as stroke. - Injuries to the spinal cord and brain. - Seizure disorders, such as epilepsy . - Cancer, such as brain tumors. - infections, such as meningitis.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14336
Concept ID:
C0027765
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Disorder of brain

The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, when problems occur, the results can be devastating. . Inflammation in the brain can lead to problems such as vision loss, weakness and paralysis. Loss of brain cells, which happens if you suffer a stroke, can affect your ability to think clearly. Brain tumors can also press on nerves and affect brain function. Some brain diseases are genetic. And we do not know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or improve symptoms. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14214
Concept ID:
C0006111
Disease or Syndrome

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