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Results: 1 to 20 of 36

1.

Complication Aspects

Used with diseases to indicate conditions that co-exist or follow, i.e., co-existing diseases, complications, or sequelae. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
223946
Concept ID:
C1171258
Pathologic Function
2.

Glanzmann's thrombasthenia

Glanzmann thrombasthenia is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by failure of platelet aggregation and by absent or diminished clot retraction. The abnormalities are related to quantitative or qualitative abnormalities of the GPIIb/IIIa platelet surface fibrinogen receptor complex resulting from mutations in either the GPIIb or GPIIIa genes (Rosenberg et al., 1997). See 187800 for discussion of a possible dominant form. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
52736
Concept ID:
C0040015
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Fibrinogen

A fibrillar protein present in blood plasma; it converts to fibrin during the process of blood clot formation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8832
Concept ID:
C0016006
Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Fibrin

A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5172
Concept ID:
C0015982
Pharmacologic Substance
5.

Retraction

MedGen UID:
568395
Concept ID:
C0332523
Finding
6.

Visual Suppression

MedGen UID:
526147
Concept ID:
C0221103
Pathologic Function
7.

Decreased platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa

Decreased cell membrane concentration of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505033
Concept ID:
CN001787
Finding
8.

Abnormal bleeding

An abnormal susceptibility to bleeding, often referred to as a bleeding diathesis. A bleeding diathesis may be related to vascular, platelet and coagulation defects. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504992
Concept ID:
CN001711
Finding
9.

Blood Loss

MedGen UID:
463638
Concept ID:
C3163616
Finding
10.

Abnormality of thrombocytes

An abnormality of platelets. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
425077
Concept ID:
CN001692
Finding
11.

Mild

The second level of severity in an ordered list based on a five-level scale of minimal, mild, moderate, marked, and severe. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
422477
Concept ID:
C2945599
12.

Thyroid hormone plasma membrane transport defect

MedGen UID:
396060
Concept ID:
C1861101
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Immune suppression

MedGen UID:
326692
Concept ID:
C1840264
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disease Response

The pathologic and/or clinical changes that result from treatment. The changes may include eradication of detectable disease, stabilization of disease, or disease progression. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
309976
Concept ID:
C1704632
Finding
15.

Severe

A term used to describe cells that look abnormal under a microscope. These cells are more likely to grow and spread quickly than cells in low-grade cancer or in growths that may become cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
16.

Adhesion

Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby organs, or to the wall of the abdomen. They can pull sections of the intestines out of place. This may block food from passing through the intestine. Adhesions can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the abdomen. Almost everyone who has surgery on the abdomen gets adhesions. Some adhesions don't cause any problems. But when they partly or completely block the intestines, they cause symptoms such as: -Severe abdominal pain or cramping. -Vomiting. -Bloating. -An inability to pass gas. -Constipation. Adhesions can sometimes cause infertility in women by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus. No tests are available to detect adhesions. Doctors usually find them during surgery to diagnose other problems. Some adhesions go away by themselves. If they partly block your intestines, a diet low in fiber can allow food to move easily through the affected area. If you have a complete intestinal obstruction, it is life threatening. You should get immediate medical attention and may need surgery. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7891
Concept ID:
C0001511
Pathologic Function
17.

Hemorrhage

Bleeding is the loss of blood. It can happen inside or outside the body. Bleeding can be a reaction to a cut or other wound. It can also result from an injury to internal organs. There are many situations in which you might bleed. A bruise is bleeding under the skin. Some strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain. Other bleeding, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, coughing up blood, or vaginal bleeding, can be a symptom of a disease. Normally, when you bleed, your blood forms clots to stop the bleeding. Severe bleeding may require first aid or a trip to the emergency room. If you have a bleeding disorder, your blood does not form clots normally.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5503
Concept ID:
C0019080
Pathologic Function
18.

Platelet disorder

Platelets are little pieces of blood cells. Platelets help wounds heal and prevent bleeding by forming blood clots. Your bone marrow makes platelets. Problems can result from having too few or too many platelets, or from platelets that do not work properly. If your blood has a low number of platelets, you can be at risk for mild to serious bleeding. If your blood has too many platelets, you may have a higher risk of blood clots. With other platelet disorders, the platelets do not work as they should. For example, in von Willebrand Disease, the platelets cannot stick together or cannot attach to blood vessel walls. This can cause excessive bleeding. Treatment of platelet disorders depends on the cause. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
610
Concept ID:
C0005818
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Genetic Diseases, Inborn

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Blood Coagulation Disorders, Inherited

Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of inherited abnormalities in blood coagulation. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
163105
Concept ID:
C0852077
Disease or Syndrome

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