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Results: 1 to 20 of 74

1.

Familial hemiplegic migraine

Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) falls within the category of migraine with aura. In migraine with aura (including familial hemiplegic migraine) the neurologic symptoms of aura are unequivocally localizable to the cerebral cortex or brain stem and include visual disturbance (most common), sensory loss (e.g., numbness or paresthesias of the face or an extremity), and dysphasia (difficulty with speech); FHM must include motor involvement, i.e., hemiparesis (weakness of an extremity). Hemiparesis occurs with at least one other symptom during FHM aura. Neurologic deficits with FHM attacks can be prolonged for hours to days and may outlast the associated migrainous headache. FHM is often earlier in onset than typical migraine, frequently beginning in the first or second decade; the frequency of attacks tends to decrease with age. Approximately 40%-50% of families with FHM1 have cerebellar signs ranging from nystagmus to progressive, usually late-onset mild ataxia. Cerebral infarction and death have rarely been associated with hemiplegic migraine. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87374
Concept ID:
C0338484
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Mental Depression

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life. Symptoms can include : -Sadness. -Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy. -Change in weight. -Difficulty sleeping or oversleeping. -Energy loss. -Feelings of worthlessness. -Thoughts of death or suicide. Depression is a disorder of the brain. There are a variety of causes, including genetic, environmental, psychological, and biochemical factors. Depression usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30, and is much more common in women. Women can also get postpartum depression after the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants and talk therapy. Most people do best by using both. . NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8325
Concept ID:
C0011570
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Depression

MedGen UID:
807334
Concept ID:
CN218434
Finding
4.

Migraine

Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by episodic attacks of headache and associated symptoms. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505085
Concept ID:
CN001878
Finding
5.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1

Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) falls within the category of migraine with aura. In migraine with aura (including familial hemiplegic migraine) the neurologic symptoms of aura are unequivocally localizable to the cerebral cortex or brain stem and include visual disturbance (most common), sensory loss (e.g., numbness or paresthesias of the face or an extremity), and dysphasia (difficulty with speech); FHM must include motor involvement, i.e., hemiparesis (weakness of an extremity). Hemiparesis occurs with at least one other symptom during FHM aura. Neurologic deficits with FHM attacks can be prolonged for hours to days and may outlast the associated migrainous headache. FHM is often earlier in onset than typical migraine, frequently beginning in the first or second decade; the frequency of attacks tends to decrease with age. Approximately 40%-50% of families with FHM1 have cerebellar signs ranging from nystagmus to progressive, usually late-onset mild ataxia. Cerebral infarction and death have rarely been associated with hemiplegic migraine. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
331389
Concept ID:
C1832894
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Depression

MedGen UID:
137999
Concept ID:
C0344315
Finding
8.

Mutant

An altered form of an individual, organism, population, or genetic character that differs from the corresponding wild type due to one or more alterations (mutations). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
109303
Concept ID:
C0596988
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
9.

Hemiplegic migraine

MedGen UID:
78740
Concept ID:
C0270862
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Migraine

Migraine is the most common type of chronic, episodic headache, as summarized by Featherstone (1985). One locus for migraine with or without aura (MGR1) has been identified on chromosome 4q24. Other loci for migraine have been identified on 6p21.1-p12.2 (MGR3; 607498), 14q21.2-q22.3 (MGR4; 607501), 19p13 (MGR5; 607508), 1q31 (MGR6; 607516), 15q11-q13 (MGR7; 609179), 5q21 (with or without aura, MGR8, 609570; with aura, MGR9, 609670), 17p13 (MGR10; 610208), 18q12 (MGR11; 610209), 10q22-q23 (MGR12; 611706), and the X chromosome (MGR2; 300125). Mutation in the KCNK18 gene (613655) on chromosome 10q25 causes migraine with aura (MGR13; 613656). A subtype of autosomal dominant migraine with aura (MA), familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM; see 141500), is caused by mutation in the CACNA1A gene (601011) on chromosome 19p13 (FHM1; 141500), by mutation in the ATP1A2 gene (182340) on chromosome 1q21 (FHM2; 602481), or by mutation in the SCN1A gene (182389) on chromosome 2q24 (FHM3; 609634). Another locus for FHM has been mapped to chromosome 1q31 (FHM4; see 607516). There is evidence that a polymorphism in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1; 133430.0005) and a polymorphism in the TNF gene (191160.0004) may confer susceptibility to migraine. A polymorphism in the endothelin receptor type A gene (EDNRA; 131243.0001) may confer resistance to migraine. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
57451
Concept ID:
C0149931
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Auras

Sensations experienced immediately prior to the onset of a seizure, migraine headache, or other nervous system disorder symptoms. Also, the patient's recognition of the beginning of an epileptic attack. Use PARAPSYCHOLOGY or PARAPSYCHOLOGICAL PHENOMENA to access references on psychic auras and halos. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
65921
Concept ID:
C0236018
Finding
12.

Migraine with aura

A subtype of migraine disorder, characterized by recurrent attacks of reversible neurological symptoms (aura) that precede or accompany the headache. Aura may include a combination of sensory disturbances, such as blurred VISION; HALLUCINATIONS; VERTIGO; NUMBNESS; and difficulty in concentrating and speaking. Aura is usually followed by features of the COMMON MIGRAINE, such as PHOTOPHOBIA; PHONOPHOBIA; and NAUSEA. (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
57822
Concept ID:
C0154723
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Migraine variants

MedGen UID:
21825
Concept ID:
C0042331
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Seizure

Seizures are symptoms of a brain problem. They happen because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. When people think of seizures, they often think of convulsions in which a person's body shakes rapidly and uncontrollably. Not all seizures cause convulsions. There are many types of seizures and some have mild symptoms. Seizures fall into two main groups. Focal seizures, also called partial seizures, happen in just one part of the brain. Generalized seizures are a result of abnormal activity on both sides of the brain. . Most seizures last from 30 seconds to 2 minutes and do not cause lasting harm. However, it is a medical emergency if seizures last longer than 5 minutes or if a person has many seizures and does not wake up between them. Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries and certain diseases. People who have recurring seizures due to a brain disorder have epilepsy. . NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20693
Concept ID:
C0036572
Sign or Symptom
15.

Hemiplegia

Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9196
Concept ID:
C0018991
Sign or Symptom
16.

Coma

A coma is a deep state of unconsciousness. An individual in a coma is alive but unable to move or respond to his or her environment. Coma may occur as a complication of an underlying illness, or as a result of injuries, such as brain injury. A coma rarely lasts more than 2 to 4 weeks. The outcome for coma depends on the cause, severity, and site of the damage. People may come out of a coma with physical, intellectual, and psychological problems. Some people may remain in a coma for years or even decades. For those people, the most common cause of death is infection, such as pneumonia. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1054
Concept ID:
C0009421
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Seizure

MedGen UID:
807319
Concept ID:
CN218424
Finding
18.

Detected

MedGen UID:
617726
Concept ID:
C0442726
Finding
19.

Resonance

MedGen UID:
534094
Concept ID:
C0231881
Finding
20.

Seizure

MedGen UID:
506957
Concept ID:
CN178372
Disease or Syndrome

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