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Results: 7

1.

Tuberous Sclerosis 12

MedGen UID:
833650
Concept ID:
CN229766
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Tuberous sclerosis and lymphangiomyomatosis

MedGen UID:
808187
Concept ID:
CN221561
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis

Infiltration of smooth muscle-like cells in lymph vessels as well as the lung (pleura, alveolar septa, bronchi, pulmonary vessels and lymphatics as well as lymph nodes, especially in posterior mediastinum and retroperitoneum). Focal emphysema can develop because of airway narrowing, and the thoracic duct may be obliterated. Pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis may lead to multiple small cysts with a hamartomatous proliferation of smooth muscle in their walls. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
786060
Concept ID:
CN188026
Finding
4.

Tuberous sclerosis 2

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder characterized by hamartomas in multiple organ systems, including the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and lung. These changes can result in epilepsy, learning difficulties, behavioral problems, and renal failure, among other complications (reviews by Crino et al., 2006 and Curatolo et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of tuberous sclerosis, see tuberous sclerosis-1 (191100), caused by mutation in the TSC1 gene (605284) on chromosome 9q34. Approximately 10 to 30% of cases of tuberous sclerosis are due to mutations in the TSC1 gene: the frequency of cases due to mutations in the TSC2 gene is consistently higher. TSC2 mutations are associated with more severe disease (Crino et al., 2006) (see GENOTYPE/PHENOTYPE CORRELATIONS section). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
348170
Concept ID:
C1860707
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Tuberous sclerosis 1

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) involves abnormalities of the skin (hypomelanotic macules, facial angiofibromas, shagreen patches, fibrous facial plaques, ungual fibromas); brain (cortical tubers, subependymal nodules [SENs] and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas [SEGAs], seizures, intellectual disability/developmental delay); kidney (angiomyolipomas, cysts, renal cell carcinomas); heart (rhabdomyomas, arrhythmias); and lungs (lymphangioleiomyomatosis [LAM]). CNS tumors are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality; renal disease is the second leading cause of early death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
344288
Concept ID:
C1854465
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Lymphangiomyomatosis

Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a condition that affects the lungs, the kidneys, and the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system consists of a network of vessels that transport lymph fluid and immune cells throughout the body. LAM is found almost exclusively in women. It usually occurs as a feature of an inherited syndrome called tuberous sclerosis complex. When LAM occurs alone it is called isolated or sporadic LAM. Signs and symptoms of LAM most often appear during a woman's thirties. Affected women have an overgrowth of abnormal smooth muscle-like cells (LAM cells) in the lungs, resulting in the formation of lung cysts and the destruction of normal lung tissue. They may also have an accumulation of fluid in the cavity around the lungs (chylothorax). The lung abnormalities resulting from LAM may cause difficulty breathing (dyspnea), chest pain, and coughing, which may bring up blood (hemoptysis). Many women with this disorder have recurrent episodes of collapsed lung (spontaneous pneumothorax). The lung problems may be progressive and, without lung transplantation, may eventually lead to limitations in activities of daily living, the need for oxygen therapy, and respiratory failure. Although LAM cells are not considered cancerous, they may spread between tissues (metastasize). As a result, the condition may recur even after lung transplantation. Women with LAM may develop cysts in the lymphatic vessels of the chest and abdomen. These cysts are called lymphangioleiomyomas. Affected women may also develop tumors called angiomyolipomas made up of LAM cells, fat cells, and blood vessels. Angiomyolipomas usually develop in the kidneys. Internal bleeding is a common complication of angiomyolipomas.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
148366
Concept ID:
C0751674
Neoplastic Process
7.

Tuberous sclerosis syndrome

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) involves abnormalities of the skin (hypomelanotic macules, facial angiofibromas, shagreen patches, fibrous facial plaques, ungual fibromas); brain (cortical tubers, subependymal nodules [SENs] and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas [SEGAs], seizures, intellectual disability/developmental delay); kidney (angiomyolipomas, cysts, renal cell carcinomas); heart (rhabdomyomas, arrhythmias); and lungs (lymphangioleiomyomatosis [LAM]). CNS tumors are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality; renal disease is the second leading cause of early death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
22518
Concept ID:
C0041341
Neoplastic Process

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