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Items: 10

1.

Melanocytic nevus

A oval and round, colored (usually medium-to dark brown, reddish brown, or flesh colored) lesion. Typically, a melanocytic nevus is less than 6 mm in diameter, but may be much smaller or larger. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504679
Concept ID:
CN000931
Finding
2.

Nevus

A nevus is a type of hamartoma that is a circumscribed stable malformation of the skin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
425158
Concept ID:
CN003400
Finding
3.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Malignant melanoma

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the size, shape, color, or feel of a mole. Most melanomas have a black or black-blue area. Melanoma may also appear as a new mole. It may be black, abnormal, or ugly looking.. Thinking of ABCDE can help you remember what to watch for:. - Asymmetry - the shape of one half does not match the other. - Border - the edges are ragged, blurred or irregular. - Color - the color is uneven and may include shades of black, brown and tan. - Diameter - there is a change in size, usually an increase. -Evolving - the mole has changed over the past few weeks or months. Surgery is the first treatment of all stages of melanoma. Other treatments include chemotherapy and radiation, biologic, and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9944
Concept ID:
C0025202
Neoplastic Process
5.

Melanoma

The presence of a melanoma, a malignant cancer originating from pigment producing melanocytes. Melanoma can originate from the skin or the pigmented layers of the eye (the uvea). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505377
Concept ID:
CN002586
Finding
6.

Epidermal nevus

Epidermal nevi are congenital lesions that affect about 1 in 1,000 people. They appear at or shortly after birth as localized epidermal thickening with hyperpigmentation that frequently follow the lines of Blaschko, suggesting that they result from postzygotic somatic mutation in the skin (Paller et al., 1994). A rare subgroup of epidermal nevi is clinically indistinguishable from other epidermal nevi, but displays histopathologic features typical of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis (see EHK, 113800), and patients with this type of epidermal nevi sometimes have offspring with generalized EHK (Paller et al., 1994). Woolly hair nevus is a rare condition characterized by the development of woolly hair in a restricted area on the scalp, either present at birth or becoming evident later in life when scalp hair begins to grow. Woolly hair nevus can be an isolated finding or can occur in association with additional ectodermal defects; epidermal nevi have been reported in association with woolly hair nevi (summary by Ramot and Zlotogorski, 2015). Nevus sebaceous, a benign congenital skin lesion that preferentially affects the scalp and face, is characterized by hairless, yellow-orange plaques of various size and shape. Histology shows that nevus sebaceous is a hamartoma consisting of epidermal, sebaceous, and apocrine elements. About 24% of nevi develop secondary tumors, some of which may be malignant (summary by Groesser et al., 2012). Also see giant pigmented hairy nevus (137550) and malignant melanoma (155600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
83106
Concept ID:
C0334082
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Neuroendocrine neoplasm

Tumors whose cells possess secretory granules and originate from the neuroectoderm, i.e., the cells of the ectoblast or epiblast that program the neuroendocrine system. Common properties across most neuroendocrine tumors include ectopic hormone production (often via APUD CELLS), the presence of tumor-associated antigens, and isozyme composition. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
64652
Concept ID:
C0206754
Neoplastic Process
8.

Neuroectodermal neoplasm

A neoplasm arising in the neuroectoderm, the portion of the ectoderm of the early embryo that gives rise to the central and peripheral nervous systems, including some glial cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
60072
Concept ID:
C0206093
Neoplastic Process
9.

Nervous tissue neoplasm

A neoplasm derived from nervous tissue (not necessarity a neoplasm located in the nervous system). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
14324
Concept ID:
C0027665
Neoplastic Process
10.

Giant pigmented hairy nevus

Congenital melanocytic nevus syndrome is characterized by pigmentary skin defects apparent at birth. Most individuals have 1 or more large or giant lesions greater than 20 cm and up to over 60 cm in diameter, which may cover up to 80% of total body area. These lesions may or may not be hairy. Smaller 'satellite' pigmented lesions numbering in the hundreds may also be present all over the body. Congenital melanocytic nevi (CMN) can be associated with malignant melanoma (see CMM1, 155600), but the risk appears to be low, ranging from 1 to 2% for all individuals, but rising to 10 to 15% in those with very large nevi (greater than 40 cm). A small subset of patients with CMNS have abnormalities of the central nervous system, known as 'neurocutaneous melanosis' or 'neuromelanosis' (249400), which may be symptomatic. Patients with CMNS also tend to have a characteristic facial appearance, including wide or prominent forehead, periorbital fullness, small short nose with narrow nasal bridge, round face, full cheeks, prominent premaxilla, and everted lower lip (summary by Kinsler et al., 2008; Kinsler et al., 2012). Spitz nevi are benign melanocytic melanomas composed of epithelioid or spindle cell melanocytes. They usually present as solitary skin tumors but can occur in multiple patterns, having agminated, dermatomal, and disseminated forms (summary by Sarin et al., 2013). Nevus spilus, also known as speckled lentiginous nevus, is a congenital hyperpigmented patch that progressively evolves, with affected individuals developing dark macules and papules during childhood and adolescence. Over time, nevus spilus may give rise to common lentigines, melanocytic nevi, Spitz nevi, and melanomas (summary by Sarin et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
330752
Concept ID:
C1842036
Finding; Neoplastic Process
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