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1.

Resistance to activated protein C due to Factor V Leiden

A hemostatic disorder characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C (APC). The activated form of Factor V (Factor Va) is more slowly degraded by activated protein C. Factor V Leiden mutation (R506Q) is the most common cause of APC resistance. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
109068
Concept ID:
C0600433
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Protein C

A vitamin-K dependent zymogen present in the blood, which, upon activation by thrombin and thrombomodulin exerts anticoagulant properties by inactivating factors Va and VIIIa at the rate-limiting steps of thrombin formation. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
46154
Concept ID:
C0033621
Pharmacologic Substance
3.

Resistance to activated protein C

Poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C. A plasma is termed 'APC resistant' when the addition of exogenous APC fails to prolong its clotting time in an activated partial thromboplastin time assay. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506684
Concept ID:
CN167901
Finding
4.

Thrombophilia due to activated protein C resistance

Factor V Leiden thrombophilia is characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C (APC) and an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is the most common VTE, with the legs being the most common site. Thrombosis in unusual locations is less common. Evidence suggests that a heterozygous factor V Leiden mutation has at most a modest effect on recurrence risk after initial treatment of a first VTE. Heterozygosity for factor V Leiden is associated with a two- to threefold increase in relative risk for pregnancy loss, and possibly other pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, fetal growth retardation, and placental abruption. The clinical expression of factor V Leiden thrombophilia is influenced by: The number of factor V Leiden alleles (heterozygotes have a slightly increased risk for venous thrombosis; homozygotes have a much greater thrombotic risk); Coexisting genetic thrombophilic disorders, which have a supra-additive effect on overall thrombotic risk; Acquired thrombophilic disorders: antiphospholipid antibodies, hyperhomocysteinemia, high factor VIII levels, malignancy; and Circumstantial risk factors: travel, central venous catheters, pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), organ transplantation, advancing age, and surgery. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
396074
Concept ID:
C1861171
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Anticoagulants

If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke by reducing the formation of blood clots in your arteries and veins. You may also take a blood thinner if you have : -An abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation. -Heart valve surgery. -Congenital heart defects. There are two main types of blood thinners. Anticoagulants, such as heparin or warfarin (also called Coumadin), work on chemical reactions in your body to lengthen the time it takes to form a blood clot. Antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin, prevent blood cells called platelets from clumping together to form a clot. When you take a blood thinner, follow directions carefully. Make sure that your healthcare provider knows all of the medicines and supplements you are using.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1970
Concept ID:
C0003280
Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Warfarin

A synthetic anticoagulant. Warfarin appears to inhibit the regeneration of vitamin K1 epoxide and so the synthesis of vitamin K dependent clotting factors, which include Factors II, VII, IX and X, and the anticoagulant proteins C and S. This inhibition results in a sequential depression of Factors VII, IX, X and II activities. Vitamin K is an essential cofactor for the post ribosomal synthesis of the vitamin K dependent clotting factors. The vitamin promotes the biosynthesis of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues in these proteins which are essential for biological activity. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
22695
Concept ID:
C0043031
Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Thrombosis

The formation or presence of a thrombus (blood clot) inside a blood vessel. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
21160
Concept ID:
C0040053
Pathologic Function
8.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Blood Coagulation Disorders, Inherited

Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of inherited abnormalities in blood coagulation. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
163105
Concept ID:
C0852077
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Coagulation Protein Disorders

Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders resulting from abnormalities or deficiencies of coagulation proteins. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
108723
Concept ID:
C0600503
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Thrombophilia

Prothrombin-related thrombophilia is characterized by venous thromboembolism (VTE) manifest most commonly in adults as deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in the legs or pulmonary embolism. The clinical expression of prothrombin-related thrombophilia is variable; many individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the 20210G>A (G20210A or c.*97G>A) allele in F2 never develop thrombosis, and while most heterozygotes who develop thrombotic complications remain asymptomatic until adulthood, some have recurrent thromboembolism before age 30 years. The relative risk for DVT in adults heterozygous for the 20210G>A allele is two- to fivefold increased; in children, the relative risk for thrombosis is three- to fourfold increased. 20210G>A heterozygosity has at most a modest effect on recurrence risk after a first episode. Although prothrombin-related thrombophilia may increase the risk for pregnancy loss, its association with preeclampsia and other complications of pregnancy such as intrauterine growth restriction and placental abruption remains controversial. Factors that predispose to thrombosis in prothrombin-related thrombophilia include: the number of 20210G>A alleles; presence of coexisting genetic abnormalities including factor V Leiden; and acquired thrombophilic disorders (e.g., antiphospholipid antibodies). Circumstantial risk factors for thrombosis include pregnancy and oral contraceptive use. Some evidence suggests that the risk for VTE in 20210G>A heterozygotes increases after travel. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98306
Concept ID:
C0398623
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Immunoglobulins

there are two types of polypeptide chains responsible for the biological and immunological properties of the different immunoglobulins, the heavy chain and the light chain; they are linked by covalent and non-covalent forces to give a four-chain Y-shaped structure based on pairs of identical heavy and light chains; each chain consists of a variable region and a constant region which are coded for by different genes; some immunoglobulin classes occur as polymers of this basic monomer. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
43841
Concept ID:
C0021027
Pharmacologic Substance
13.

Thrombus

MedGen UID:
43439
Concept ID:
C0087086
Pathologic Function
14.

Embolism and Thrombosis

A collective term for pathological conditions which are caused by the formation of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel, or by blocking of a blood vessel with an EMBOLUS, undissolved materials in the blood stream. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
43147
Concept ID:
C0085307
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include: - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities

Diseases existing at birth and often before birth, or that develop during the first month of life (INFANT, NEWBORN, DISEASES), regardless of causation. Of these diseases, those characterized by structural deformities are termed CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14319
Concept ID:
C0027612
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hemic and Lymphatic Diseases

Hematologic diseases and diseases of the lymphatic system collectively. Hemic diseases include disorders involving the formed elements (e.g., ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION, INTRAVASCULAR) and chemical components (e.g., BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS); lymphatic diseases include disorders relating to lymph, lymph nodes, and lymphocytes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6780
Concept ID:
C0018981
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Hematological Disease

Your blood is living tissue made up of liquid and solids. The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood and prevent your blood from doing its job. They can be acute or chronic. Many blood disorders are inherited. Other causes include other diseases, side effects of medicines, and a lack of certain nutrients in your diet. Types of blood disorders include: -Platelet disorders, excessive clotting, and bleeding problems, which affect how your blood clots. -Anemia, which happens when your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. -Cancers of the blood, such as leukemia and myeloma. -Eosinophilic disorders, which are problems with one type of white blood cell.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5483
Concept ID:
C0018939
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder affecting the heart or the vessels (arteries, veins and lymph vessels). Representative examples of non-neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocarditis and hypertension. Representative examples of neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocardial myxoma and angiosarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Blood clotting factor

Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
605
Concept ID:
C0005789
Pharmacologic Substance

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