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Results: 15

1.

Childhood

From 2 to 11 years of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
832642
Concept ID:
CN227394
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Infancy

From 4 weeks to 23 months of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
832100
Concept ID:
CN227393
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1

PFIC1, a type of progressive familial intrahepathic cholestasis (PFIC, see this term), is an infantile hereditary disorder in bile formation that is hepatocellular in origin and associated with extrahepatic features. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
830887
Concept ID:
CN205891
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2), a type of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC, see this term), is a severe, neonatal, hereditary disorder in bile formation that is hepatocellular in origin and not associated with extrahepatic features. Initially, PFIC2 was reported under the name Byler syndrome. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
799203
Concept ID:
CN205889
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Intrahepatic cholestasis

Impairment of bile flow due to obstruction in the small bile ducts within the liver. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504831
Concept ID:
CN001287
Finding
6.

Cholestasis

Impairment of bile flow due to obstruction in bile ducts. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504828
Concept ID:
CN001277
Finding
7.

Benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis 2

ATP8B1 deficiency encompasses a phenotypic spectrum ranging from severe to intermediate to mild, based on an individual’s clinical findings and laboratory test results, including liver biopsy. Severe ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by onset of symptoms of cholestasis (pruritus and attacks of jaundice) within the first few months of life. Secondary manifestations such as coagulopathy (due to vitamin K deficiency), malabsorption, and poor weight gain may present earlier than age three months. Without surgical intervention, cirrhosis and evolution to end-stage hepatic failure and death usually ensue before the third decade. Mild ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by intermittent episodes of cholestasis manifest as severe pruritus and jaundice; chronic liver damage does not typically develop. In contrast to patients in whom bouts of cholestasis are induced only by particular triggers known to increase risk of cholestasis (drug exposure, shifts in hormonal milieu [including those resulting from ingestion of contraceptive drugs or from pregnancy], coexistent malignancy), some or all bouts of cholestasis in individuals with mild ATP8B1 deficiency have different or unknown triggers. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
435857
Concept ID:
C2608083
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Low Gamma-GT Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis

MedGen UID:
433157
Concept ID:
CN043628
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis 1

ATP8B1 deficiency encompasses a phenotypic spectrum ranging from severe to intermediate to mild, based on an individual’s clinical findings and laboratory test results, including liver biopsy. Severe ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by onset of symptoms of cholestasis (pruritus and attacks of jaundice) within the first few months of life. Secondary manifestations such as coagulopathy (due to vitamin K deficiency), malabsorption, and poor weight gain may present earlier than age three months. Without surgical intervention, cirrhosis and evolution to end-stage hepatic failure and death usually ensue before the third decade. Mild ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by intermittent episodes of cholestasis manifest as severe pruritus and jaundice; chronic liver damage does not typically develop. In contrast to patients in whom bouts of cholestasis are induced only by particular triggers known to increase risk of cholestasis (drug exposure, shifts in hormonal milieu [including those resulting from ingestion of contraceptive drugs or from pregnancy], coexistent malignancy), some or all bouts of cholestasis in individuals with mild ATP8B1 deficiency have different or unknown triggers. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
383756
Concept ID:
C1855731
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis 3

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a disorder that causes progressive liver disease, which typically leads to liver failure. In people with PFIC, liver cells are less able to secrete a digestive fluid called bile. The buildup of bile in liver cells causes liver disease in affected individuals. Signs and symptoms of PFIC typically begin in infancy and are related to bile buildup and liver disease. Specifically, affected individuals experience severe itching, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice), failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive), high blood pressure in the vein that supplies blood to the liver (portal hypertension), and an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly). There are three known types of PFIC: PFIC1, PFIC2, and PFIC3. The types are also sometimes described as shortages of particular proteins needed for normal liver function. Each type has a different genetic cause. In addition to signs and symptoms related to liver disease, people with PFIC1 may have short stature, deafness, diarrhea, inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), and low levels of fat-soluble vitamins (vitamins A, D, E, and K) in the blood. Affected individuals typically develop liver failure before adulthood. The signs and symptoms of PFIC2 are typically related to liver disease only; however, these signs and symptoms tend to be more severe than those experienced by people with PFIC1. People with PFIC2 often develop liver failure within the first few years of life. Additionally, affected individuals are at increased risk of developing a type of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma. Most people with PFIC3 have signs and symptoms related to liver disease only. Signs and symptoms of PFIC3 usually do not appear until later in infancy or early childhood; rarely, people are diagnosed in early adulthood. Liver failure can occur in childhood or adulthood in people with PFIC3.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
356333
Concept ID:
C1865643
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis 2

ATP8B1 deficiency encompasses a phenotypic spectrum ranging from severe to intermediate to mild, based on an individual’s clinical findings and laboratory test results, including liver biopsy. Severe ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by onset of symptoms of cholestasis (pruritus and attacks of jaundice) within the first few months of life. Secondary manifestations such as coagulopathy (due to vitamin K deficiency), malabsorption, and poor weight gain may present earlier than age three months. Without surgical intervention, cirrhosis and evolution to end-stage hepatic failure and death usually ensue before the third decade. Mild ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by intermittent episodes of cholestasis manifest as severe pruritus and jaundice; chronic liver damage does not typically develop. In contrast to patients in whom bouts of cholestasis are induced only by particular triggers known to increase risk of cholestasis (drug exposure, shifts in hormonal milieu [including those resulting from ingestion of contraceptive drugs or from pregnancy], coexistent malignancy), some or all bouts of cholestasis in individuals with mild ATP8B1 deficiency have different or unknown triggers. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
356162
Concept ID:
C1866138
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
14.

Progressive intrahepatic cholestasis

ATP8B1 deficiency encompasses a phenotypic spectrum ranging from severe to intermediate to mild, based on an individual’s clinical findings and laboratory test results, including liver biopsy. Severe ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by onset of symptoms of cholestasis (pruritus and attacks of jaundice) within the first few months of life. Secondary manifestations such as coagulopathy (due to vitamin K deficiency), malabsorption, and poor weight gain may present earlier than age three months. Without surgical intervention, cirrhosis and evolution to end-stage hepatic failure and death usually ensue before the third decade. Mild ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by intermittent episodes of cholestasis manifest as severe pruritus and jaundice; chronic liver damage does not typically develop. In contrast to patients in whom bouts of cholestasis are induced only by particular triggers known to increase risk of cholestasis (drug exposure, shifts in hormonal milieu [including those resulting from ingestion of contraceptive drugs or from pregnancy], coexistent malignancy), some or all bouts of cholestasis in individuals with mild ATP8B1 deficiency have different or unknown triggers. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75668
Concept ID:
C0268312
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Hereditary disease

Genes are the building blocks of heredity. They are passed from parent to child. They hold DNA, the instructions for making proteins. Proteins do most of the work in cells. They move molecules from one place to another, build structures, break down toxins, and do many other maintenance jobs. Sometimes there is a mutation, a change in a gene or genes. The mutation changes the gene's instructions for making a protein, so the protein does not work properly or is missing entirely. This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from one or both parents. A mutation can also happen during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders:. -Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects one gene. Sickle cell anemia is an example. -Chromosomal disorders, where chromosomes (or parts of chromosomes) are missing or changed. Chromosomes are the structures that hold our genes. Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder. -Complex disorders, where there are mutations in two or more genes. Often your lifestyle and environment also play a role. Colon cancer is an example. Genetic tests on blood and other tissue can identify genetic disorders. NIH: National Library of Medicine.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5527
Concept ID:
C0019247
Disease or Syndrome

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